Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Our physiology, determines what we eat.

Expand Messages
  • fran k
    Hi. For everyones info on our physiology and what we as an animal are developed to eat. Heres a medical essay on: Our physiology entitled The Comparative
    Message 1 of 58 , May 1, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi. For everyones info on our physiology and what we as an animal are developed to eat.

      Heres a medical essay on:

      Our physiology entitled 'The Comparative Anatomy of Eating' by Milton R Mills. M.D.

      http://www.vegsource.com/news/2009/11/the-comparative-anatomy-of-eating.html

      Have a look at the comments following the article. Theyre very interesting.

      :)frank

      On Sun, 01 May 2011 15:00 BST Gail Lloyd wrote:

      >Also read The Whole Soy Story by Kaayla T. Daniel, to find out the dark side of
      >soy. 
      >
      >I believe that fermented soy (tempeh, miso, natto, namu shoyu) in small amounts
      >are fine because any fermented food in small amounts help digestion.
      >Humans need the nutrients in meat that are not found in very many plant foods
      >(and not easily obtainable).  But we don't need meat in large
      >quantities...probably once a month or so would be just fine, because our bodies
      >hold some nutrients for a long time.  Just think of what our ancient ancestors
      >needed...they hunted for their meat and didn't get it every day.  Our bodies are
      >pretty much the same now as then, with few differences as far as nutrition is
      >concerned.  You can find more info on this when you google Paleolithic diet. 
      >
      >I've always believed that almost everything is good in moderation (with the
      >exception of refined foods and foods that have been tampered with by humans like
      >putting pesticides on produce, giving grains to grass-eating animals etc).  Jack
      >LaLane always said, "If man made it, don't eat it."...I think he had a very
      >valid point. 
      >
      >To back up my theories, I've tried all different kinds of diets, including
      >vegetarian.  I know everyone is a little different, yet we're all basically the
      >same, and we have teeth with molars to prove it (meant to chew meat). I eat a
      >mostly vegetarian diet with mostly raw foods, with very little processed foods,
      >and free-range meat occasionally, and free-range eggs at least 3X/wk.  I can
      >count on one hand the number of times I've been sick in the last 20 years of
      >following this diet.  That is proof enough for me.  I'm 62, 5'6", weigh 115 lb
      >and never felt better.
      >Gail,
      >Horticulturist
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________
      >From: john willis <wilf1946@...>
      >To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      >Sent: Sat, April 30, 2011 11:17:56 AM
      >Subject: RE: [pfaf] Re: Plant based diets Was "definition of "farm"
      >

      >BUT - world demand for meat can only be met by intensive, industrialised farming
      >and the damage done by that is unsustainable................so, if we cannot
      >live without it and producing it cannot be sustained where do we go from here.
      >
      >
      >John.
      >
      >________________________________
      >To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      >From: camaspermaculture@...
      >Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 16:36:05 +0000
      >Subject: [pfaf] Re: Plant based diets Was "definition of "farm"
      >

      >
      >Annie, to be polite let me just say that I completely disagree with your "facts"
      >and I will simply ask you to tell me which traditional cultures-ones that aren't
      >dependent on mechanized industrialized agriculture and processing-have
      >eliminated meat from their diet. In Japan, where many of the products you
      >mentioned originate, they do NOT eat these foods in the way you mention. They
      >are a very small part of the diet, more of a flavoring than a substantial part
      >of any meal. BTW, even if all the soy produced in this country wasn't GMO, I
      >wouldn't touch the stuff because it is very difficult even with long
      >fermentation to remove all of the anti-nutrients and hormones from it. The only
      >animals that do well with soy are poultry after the soy is roasted.
      >It isn't just vitamins and amino acids. The fats contained only in meats also
      >contain essential nutrition that support the hormone and immune system.
      >Naturally raised meats and fat are necessary parts of a healthy diet. The list
      >of why your regurgitation of what the industrialized food processing world would
      >like us to believe about our food is wrong is too long to post. Your facts have
      >no more scientific basis than Buddhism, although, I can see that your faith in
      >soy beans is deep and heart felt. I suggest picking up Sally Fallon's
      >"Nourishing Traditions" in which she deals with this subject in depth in the
      >Introduction. You can also dig out the information http://www.westonaprice.org
      >
      >Tom
      >--- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Annie Sampson" <annie@...> wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> Tom,
      >>
      >> I am a nutritionist.................
      >
      >
    • terry lim
      By the pic, it looks like the malaysian local fruit - chichu whose seeds look exactly the same & it s sweet & well liked by many.
      Message 58 of 58 , May 17, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        By the pic, it looks like the malaysian local fruit - chichu whose seeds look exactly the same & it's sweet & well liked by many.

        On Tue, May 17, 2011 at 9:51 PM, Javier Cosp <jcosp@...> wrote:
         
        [Attachment(s) from Javier Cosp included below]


        Somebody knows this fruit? Can be eaten?

        Javier Cosp
        Asuncion, Paraguay


      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.