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Re: [pfaf] Re: cool/cold climate greenhouse

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  • Ossi Kakko
    Just want to let you know that Jerome Osentowski in Central Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute has excellent cool/cold climate greenhouse design utilizing
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 3, 2011
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      Just want to let you know that Jerome Osentowski in Central Rocky Mountain
      Permaculture Institute has excellent cool/cold climate greenhouse design
      utilizing the subterranean heating and cooling system, aka climate
      battery. See more info:

      http://permaculture.org.au/2010/08/16/clever-rocky-mountain-greenhouses-give-major-season-extension/

      http://ecosystems-design.com/Greenhouse%20Design%20Services.html


      :) ossi (from finland)


      > You have to have lots of panels and lots of storage capacity to handle the
      > nights and the unexpected days when there is cloud cover. In northern
      > latitudes, solar in winter is a dream or a very, very expensive reality.
      >
      > From experience, it doesn't take many hours to drain a storage bank if it
      > is not being replenished every day and I do mean every day. An overcast
      > day is a big, big problem. Two days in a row means turning on the mains
      > or a generator. When ever I look at a so-called off-grid setup, the
      > moment I see a generator is the moment that I call foul.
      >
      > Since you are trying to minimise heat loss, it would seem to make sense to
      > look at construction. Obviously, south facing is critical. If that's
      > where the sun is strongest, why expose the northern wall to the air?
      > Insulate it, ideally, by building into a hill side and burying all but
      > that south wall. Build on a concrete slab that is painted black.
      >
      > MikeH
      >
      > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, john willis <wilf1946@...> wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> Hello Traveller in ThymeTotally agree about heating greenhouses with
      >> fossil fuel but I do feel they are pretty good passive solar collectors
      >> on sunny days and also pv panels can be used to charge batteries for
      >> nights and dark days.JohnMW
      >>
      >> To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      >> From: traveler.in.thyme@...
      >> Date: Wed, 2 Mar 2011 13:59:36 +0000
      >> Subject: [pfaf] Re: overwintering tomatoes in greenhouse
      >>
      >
      >
    • Steve
      Hi there, Poultry and other living beings we share our farm/homestead spaces with may contribute heat to a greenhouse in winter. Peace and love. Steve. --
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 3, 2011
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        Hi there,
         
        Poultry and other living beings we share our farm/homestead spaces with may contribute heat to a greenhouse in winter.
         
        Peace and love.

        Steve.

        --
        "All that is gold does not glitter,
        Not all those who wander are lost;
        The old that is strong does not wither,
        Deep roots are not reached by the frost.
        From the ashes a fire shall be woken,
        A light from the shadows shall spring;
        Renewed shall be blade that was broken,
        The crownless again shall be king."
        ~  J.R.R. Tolkien

      • travelerinthyme
        I had a friend in the A/C biz tell me that you should never expect your heat/cool mechanism to make more than a 20 degree Farenheit difference between the
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 4, 2011
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          I had a friend in the A/C biz tell me that you should never expect your heat/cool mechanism to make more than a 20 degree Farenheit difference between the indoors and outdoors, or else you are spending way too much money and overburdening your equipment. If it's cold inside, put on longjohns and a sweater, if it's pleasant, open the windows (why I never could stand working in an office or retail store ... Claustrophobia!)



          I've always wish I lived at Amory Lovins' house in Colorado, with banana trees in the greenhouse. But that kinda emphasises my point that it's easier to maintain a greenhouse in the cold than in the heat. Same with our house here in Texas. You can put on longjohns and a sweater, and sit by the fire on chilly days, but when it's 99 degrees in the shade with 99% humidity, ain't nowhere to run, nowhere to hide, and the A/C bills are horrendous. This big old barn is not too difficult to cool, as the wide eaves prevent the sun from hitting the glass until late afternoon, when I pull the same thick, insulating drapes we use to keep out the winter drafts.

          ~Traveler in Thyme, zone 8-9
        • Sapho
          Thats very intresting, thanks for the links! More on heating greenhouses in substainable & energy efficient ways: Has any of you done any experimenting with
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 4, 2011
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            Thats very intresting, thanks for the links!

            More on heating greenhouses in substainable & energy efficient ways:
            Has any of you done any experimenting with compost-heating?

            http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/compostheatedgh.html

            Sapha



            --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Ossi Kakko" <ossi@...> wrote:
            >
            > Just want to let you know that Jerome Osentowski in Central Rocky Mountain
            > Permaculture Institute has excellent cool/cold climate greenhouse design
            > utilizing the subterranean heating and cooling system, aka climate
            > battery. See more info:
            >
            > http://permaculture.org.au/2010/08/16/clever-rocky-mountain-greenhouses-give-major-season-extension/
            >
            > http://ecosystems-design.com/Greenhouse%20Design%20Services.html
            >
            >
            > :) ossi (from finland)
            >
            >
            > > You have to have lots of panels and lots of storage capacity to handle the
            > > nights and the unexpected days when there is cloud cover. In northern
            > > latitudes, solar in winter is a dream or a very, very expensive reality.
            > >
            > > From experience, it doesn't take many hours to drain a storage bank if it
            > > is not being replenished every day and I do mean every day. An overcast
            > > day is a big, big problem. Two days in a row means turning on the mains
            > > or a generator. When ever I look at a so-called off-grid setup, the
            > > moment I see a generator is the moment that I call foul.
            > >
            > > Since you are trying to minimise heat loss, it would seem to make sense to
            > > look at construction. Obviously, south facing is critical. If that's
            > > where the sun is strongest, why expose the northern wall to the air?
            > > Insulate it, ideally, by building into a hill side and burying all but
            > > that south wall. Build on a concrete slab that is painted black.
            > >
            > > MikeH
            > >
            > > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, john willis <wilf1946@> wrote:
            > >>
            > >>
            > >> Hello Traveller in ThymeTotally agree about heating greenhouses with
            > >> fossil fuel but I do feel they are pretty good passive solar collectors
            > >> on sunny days and also pv panels can be used to charge batteries for
            > >> nights and dark days.JohnMW
            > >>
            > >> To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            > >> From: traveler.in.thyme@
            > >> Date: Wed, 2 Mar 2011 13:59:36 +0000
            > >> Subject: [pfaf] Re: overwintering tomatoes in greenhouse
            > >>
            > >
            > >
            >
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