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CAP single payment scheme

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  • Richard Morris
    I was just browsing through the DEFRA site and found some references to the Common Agricultural Policy, single payment scheme. From
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 12, 2004
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      I was just browsing through the DEFRA site and found some
      references to the Common Agricultural Policy, single payment scheme.

      From http://www.defra.gov.uk/farm/capreform/index.htm

      Agreement June 2003 - Introduction

      Summary of Single Payment Scheme for England - 12 February 2004

      Main Points

      1. The CAP reform agreement was a major breakthrough; it achieved
      far more than many expected, freeing farmers to produce what the market
      and consumers want rather than what the subsidy regimes dictate.
      2. The reforms provide the opportunity to reduce the bureaucracy
      farmers face, by rolling a plethora of subsidies into a new single
      payment which is not linked to what they produce.
      3. It will reduce the environmental impact of farming by removing an
      incentive to intensify production and by linking subsidy to compliance
      with environmental and other standards.
      4. It is right that farmers should comply with environmental, food
      safety and animal welfare standards if they are to enjoy taxpayer
      subsidy. Nevertheless, we intend to introduce these requirements in a
      proportionate way.
      5. The deal also means more resources for wider rural development goals.
      6. We want to use the opportunities from these reforms to put our
      farming industry onto a profitable and sustainable path.


      To my mind this all seems to be a big step in the right
      direction. The only down side from a Perennial perspective
      is:
      (http://www.defra.gov.uk/farm/capreform/implementation/impl02.htm)
      A flat rate payment will apply in England, with each eligible hectare
      (excluding permanent crops and forestry) in each region attracting the
      same rate of subsidy.

      Hence growing permanent perennials crops will
      be excluded ;-(.

      Rich
      --
      Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
      Web: http://www.pfaf.org/ same as http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/pfaf/
      Post: 1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
      Tel: 01208 872 963 / 0845 458 4719
      Email: webmaster@...
      PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf
    • Phil Slade
      To my mind this all seems to be a big step in the right direction. The only down side from a Perennial perspective is:
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 12, 2004
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        To my mind this all seems to be a big step in the right
        direction. The only down side from a Perennial perspective
        is:
        (http://www.defra.gov.uk/farm/capreform/implementation/impl02.htm)
        A flat rate payment will apply in England, with each eligible hectare
        (excluding permanent crops and forestry) in each region attracting the
        same rate of subsidy.

        Hence growing permanent perennials crops will
        be excluded ;-(.


        Yes, but not necessarily forever, it is an adaptable/reformable regime, if
        very slow moving.
        If permanent perennials crops are a valid option they will eventually be
        included (we hope ).
        regards Phil.
      • Richard Morris
        ... So I now find that this is breaking news, (odd I only stumbled across this today while looking at defra grants). There was an 10 min piece on this Radio 4
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 12, 2004
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          I wrote:
          > (http://www.defra.gov.uk/farm/capreform/implementation/impl02.htm)
          > A flat rate payment will apply in England, with each eligible hectare
          > (excluding permanent crops and forestry) in each region attracting the
          > same rate of subsidy.

          So I now find that this is breaking news, (odd I only
          stumbled across this today while looking at defra grants).

          There was an 10 min piece on this Radio 4 today.
          This mainly focussed on on the threat it may pose to
          orchards with one farmer saying how he was going to have
          to burn his orchard as it will become economically
          unsustainable. Probably a bit of an over reaction
          as there is a four year transition period.

          Is there a need for a bit of campaigning on this issue.
          I'm going to fax my MP (FaxYourMP.com).

          >
          > Hence growing permanent perennials crops will
          > be excluded ;-(.
          >

          Phil Slade wrote:
          > Yes, but not necessarily forever, it is an adaptable/reformable regime, if
          > very slow moving.
          > If permanent perennials crops are a valid option they will eventually be
          > included (we hope ).
          > regards Phil.

          Heres hoping.

          Rich
          --
          Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
          Web: http://www.pfaf.org/ same as http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/pfaf/
          Post: 1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
          Tel: 01208 872 963 / 0845 458 4719
          Email: webmaster@...
          PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf
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