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Re: [pfaf] Juniper drink (other health uses for juniper berries)

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  • Cyndee S
    The drink sounds good. Remember, juniper berries are used in making gin! Here in Germany, juniper berries (Wacholderbeeren) are used in several favorite
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 14, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      The drink sounds good. Remember, juniper berries are used in making gin! Here in Germany, juniper berries (Wacholderbeeren) are used in several favorite dishes, as well as in a lot of folk remedies, especially for the pain of arthritis and rheumatism, and anything involving the kidneys (they are a strong diuretic). You can just take the fresh or dried berries, crush them a bit) tie them up in a cheesecloth, and put them in your bath. Ummmm. You can also make an ointment with them to rub into sore joints. This site tells how:
      (article menu on the lower right side of the first page).
      I imagine one could crush a few juniper berries to put into that gin-and-raisin arthritis cure to make it even stronger.  Anyone try it yet?
      Have fun!
      Oh yes -- one of my other German folk cures I learned here is to eat a Nasturtium leaf or two every day to keep colds away...the sulpher in them helps disinfect the airways, and builds up the immune system.  And the leaves and flowers taste great in salads!
      Cynhilde,
      American opera singer, 
      have lived in Germany 24 years now.

      --- On Mon, 2/14/11, Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:

      From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
      Subject: [pfaf] Juniper drink
      To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, February 14, 2011, 10:13 PM

       

      According to 

      Cornucopia,
      yes
      J virginiana branchlets and berriies are used...
      Juniperus sabina  is toxic,  
      so not all Junipers are OK.

      You have some seeds to spare ??

      Geir Flatabø

      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      From: Peter knop <peterknop@...>
      Date: 2011/2/14
      Subject: Re: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink
      To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com




      "juniper berry" covers a multitude of sins.  Are ALL juniper berries good to use? Juniperus virginiana tends to be loaded with berries, even this time of year (pale blue, small, takes two or three minutes to harvest a cup. Does it matter if a few needles are mixed in?  Maybe adds a bit of retzina flavor?


      From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
      To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 12:37:48 PM
      Subject: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink

       

      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      From: Guttorm Flatabø <post@...>

      My son have posted a Buzz about Juniper berries,
      might be of interest to this list.....

      Geir Flatabø

      >  Link to this post:
      >  http://www.google.com/buzz/105377732872681737540/9JMhWmiFjXr/Place-about-2-cups-liter-of-juniper-berries-in-a
      >
      > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: "Place about 2 cups (½ liter) of juniper berries in a gallon (4 liter) jug, and fill it with water. No sugar or anything else required. Ferment for about a month, stirring or shaking and releasing pressure periodically. Truly delicious."
      >
      > Latest fermentation tip from wildfermentation.com
      >
      > Haven't tried myself, would like to use fresh juniper berries, and they're not that easy to get, I think.
      > Feb 7 John Bump: I spend a significant amount of time each year cutting out junipers. I might give this a try.
      > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: Cool, I recommend you keep everything except the berries sterile (and free from contamination such as chlorine). The shaking and stirring might also not be necessary if you use a container with airlock.
      > Feb 7 John Bump: I already have a fermentation jug with airlock from our disastrously abortive attempt to make vodka (aka "The House Of Stink") so I'm set as regards equipment. If I've time once juniper-berry season comes around I'll try it.





    • Peter knop
      Bamboo nutrition Sorry to have not replied to all the interesting and helpful comments and questions on my post on bamboo nutrition. But here are a few salient
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 14, 2011
      • 0 Attachment

        Bamboo nutrition

        Sorry to have not replied to all the interesting and helpful comments and questions on my post on bamboo nutrition. But here are a few salient points and places to go for additional information.

              If I left out answering some questions, please write again.

        Below are a few notes on nutrition and related matters. I would like to thank everyone for their contributions on the subject.  As a farmer, I would agree with the person who wrote about alfalfa – a hard crop to deal with as a grower, and expensive to harvest for winter use, as opposed to bamboo which sits there all winter waiting to be eaten.

              One other forage crop not mentioned, but which produces very large quantities of forage during the growing season is willow (many different varieties of Salix), but an enormously fast grower, and livestock love it.

              Our goats eat all our bamboo varieties and are not picky like Pandas. Note that zoos feed a good deal of bamboo to their collections other than Pandas and will have lots of info on nutrition (I have lost/misplaced my file on this).  Protein does seem to run in the 15% to 20% range for mature leaves without undue fertilization or other efforts.  Note though that shoots have far lower nutritional value (see below).  Best nutrition is in mature leaves (6 months and older.)

             We generally harvest our bamboo at age two or three as we thin the stands. This gives greatest volume of material per square foot of grove. Can also clear cut swaths through a stand, but must be careful to keep a proper balance of remaining culms versus root mass so as to maximize regrowth. National Zoo in Washington overharvested their material and actually ran out a year or so ago.  They also are making the mistake of relying on one variety, which when it flowers (and then dies) will leave them in an emergency situation as they will have to search for new varieties which Pandas (and their other animals) will like,  and will be available (difficult in DC area as little bamboo there other than Aureosulcata which they currently use). We all can learn from  other’s mistakes.  Arrow bamboo (Japonica) is a poor food source due to short term flowering cycles which kill it off.

        Human values for % MDR of fresh shoots

        Raw shoots  per 100 gram

        Carbohydrate  6 g

        fibre  2 g

        Sugars 4 g

        Protein  3 g

        Vitamin C   7%

        Iron 3%

        Calcium 1.5%

        Note that shoots have lower content of just about everything, foliage increases dramatically in some cases.

         

        Foliage for forage

         

        Some interesting references:  I would note that the varieties chosen for the West Virginia (Zone 6ish I would guess) are not necessarily the best as they are less vigorous than other easily obtained varieties such as P rubromarginata and P. bissetii as well as P aureosulcata and P aureosulcata ‘spectablis’  Also, there are very low growing ( one to three foot) varieties which again, due to their evergreen nature and high protein content when mature, make excellent winter grazing when all else is gone.

        Nutritive value of bamboo as browse for livestock Article author query

        J.J. Halvorsona1 c1, K.A. Cassidaa1, K.E. Turnera1 and D.P. Beleskya1

        a1 Appalachian Farming Systems Research Center, ARS, USDA, Beaver, WV, USA.Abstract

        Small farms in Appalachia need management options that diversify income opportunities, are adaptable to new livestock management strategies, and help maintain environmental integrity. Plantings of temperate bamboo (Poaceae), including species native to West Virginia, were established to determine the potential nutritive value for small ruminants, such as goats (Capra hircus), at different times of the year. The bamboo species we evaluated, included several Phyllostachys spp., Semiarundiaria fastuosa and Arundinaria gigantea, were able to withstand Appalachian winter temperatures and retain some green leaves even in late winter. Although small differences were evident, the nutritive value was generally comparable among species and exhibited similar trends over the season. Total non-structural carbohydrates in bamboo leaves decreased throughout the growing season, and then remained stable or increased during winter. Conversely, crude protein was relatively low in young leaves compared to late season or over-wintered leaves. Concentrations of fiber and protein were sufficient to meet the maintenance needs of adult goats. The ability of bamboo to remain green and maintain the nutritive value throughout winter suggested that it has potential as winter forage for goats in central Appalachia. As an upright browse, bamboo may reduce the exposure of goats to gastrointestinal parasites. Perennial stands of temperate bamboo could prove to be a valuable, multiple-use crop suitable for Appalachian farm operations and easily adaptable to goat production systems.

          

        PJK Note to above:  Note that various animals prefer various species. Interesting aside, Pandas, well known for eating bamboo, also enjoy a hearty steak – they are vegetarian carnivores as are most bears, what I would probably call omnivores. It appears that like people, some pandas prefer one variety over another. P. aurea though seems to be not appreciated (but check with San Diego Zoo as well as other zoos.

         

         MISC:

        Bamboo leaf extract supplement by Ray Sahelian, M.D. Medicinal uses, latest research studies and review of benefits and side effects

        Bamboo leaf has been used in China as a food and herbal medicine. The botanical name for bamboo is bambusa vulgaris. There are more than a thousand species of bamboo around the globe. Bamboo is a rich source of silica. For more information on Chinese herbs.

        Bamboo leaf research
        The effect of bamboo leaves extract on hemorheology of normal rats
        Zhong Yao Cai. 2005 Feb;28(2):130-2. Department of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang
        Sixty rats were randomly divides into six groups. Blood stasis model was set up by sc isoprenaline, and different dose of bamboo leaf extract (15 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg) were iv. The effects of bamboo leaf extract  on rat's blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, FIB, ESR, TK, electrophoresis times and HCT were measured by automatic analysis system. Sixty mice were randomly divided into six groups, and the serum cholesterol of the high cholesterol's mice was obtained by eyepit vein and measured. The results showed that bamboo leaf extract (15 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg) could reduce blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, FIB, ESR, TK, HCT and increase the speed of electrophoresis time in blood adhesion model, and bamboo leaf extract (22.5 mg/kg, 45 mg/kg, 90 mg/kg) could significantly reduce serum
        cholesterol of the high cholesterol in mice.

        Commercial bamboo leaf extract
        Cactus Botanics bamboo leaves dry extract, manufactured through the process of water-ethanol extraction, membrane filtration chromatography, vacuum concentration and spray drying, is now available. Cactus Botanics has determined that the major components of its bamboo leaves extract are flavonoids, lactones and phenolic acids, with the flavonoids being mainly flavone glycosides, including orientin, homoorientin, isovitexin, vitexin and tricin. The lactones in the extract are mainly hydroxyl coumarin and its derivatives. The phenolic acids are mainly derivatives of cinnamic acid including chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid. The bamboo leaves extract is intended to be used in dietary supplements applications in capsule form. Because of its water solubility, it can also be used in other nutraceutical products such as milk powder and nutraceutical beverages. It has also been added to regular foods such as rice and noodle to increase nutrition values.

        Q. Bamboo is showing up in beauty products across the board, from hair care to facial scrubs to organic soaps, while bamboo leaf extract supplements claim to aid in anti-aging and strengthening bones and tissues. Are there any benefits of using topical bamboo leaf extract over ingesting it as a supplement (or vice versa)? Can a person eat bamboo and reap the same benefits of ingesting a bamboo leaf extract supplement?
           A. Using topical bamboo leaf extract on the skin is not likely to lead to much absorption of the active ingredients into the blood stream whereas ingesting it as a supplement  could lead to potential health benefits. Bamboo shoots are used in certain Asian dishes and broths, and are available in supermarkets in various sliced forms. Since there have not been studies comparing the health benefits of consuming bamboo shoots versus taking a leaf extract supplement, it is not easy to say which form is preferable but I suspect both are good options.

        Bamboo salt?
        We received this interesting email"
        Dear New Item Developing Manager, We knew in web site that you are the supplier of health food. We are pleased to introduce ourselves as the supplier of Bamboo Salt. Bamboo Salt is unique in the world. This bamboo Salt is manufactured under the instruction of Intangible Cultural Property. Sun-dried salt which is produced in clear west sea of Korea is put ! in Bamboos. Bamboos with sun-dried salt are burned and melted 850 – 1500 degree C in clay furnace by pine tree. Burned salt rock after burning is grinded. Grinded salt is put again in Bamboos and burned again in clay furnace. This process is executed up to 3-9 times. During final burning at 1,500 degree C, this salt is melted completely. All of noxious material like heavy metals in Salt is removed. 9 times or 3 times burned and melted Purple Bamboo Salt is good for health. Re : 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt.  We make 9 times or 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt for health care and 1 time burned Bamboo Salt for flavoring cooking normally. The price of 9 times burned and melted Bamboo Salt is very expensive although there are many benefits for health care. So, we think that it is some difficult to find new foreign markets. Therefore, we tested 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt many times and succeed in making similar to 9 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt. Surely, price is decreased greatly. Please consider this 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt for health care. And also, you can sell this Bamboo Salt as Ingredient to health food manufacturers using some salt. In Korea, our 9 times or 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt are used as Ingredient for Toothpaste, Soap, face mask pack, bakery, confectionery, vagina detergent and etc. So, please consider various markets.
           Re : 1 time burned Bamboo Salt. This is not melted. It is only 1 time burned Bamboo Salt. It is used for flavoring for cooking or Ingredient for some foods. We are now finding agent in your country. \if you are interests in our product, please feel free to contact us. Junghun Shim, Myju Ind., Corp. Tel. 82 2 523 9658.

        Bamboo in skin care
        Finely milled bamboo powder is used as an exfoliant in cleansers and scrubs. The smooth bamboo particles are less harsh than the scraggly, uneven grains made from salt and nuts, making it safer and less irritating to sensitive skin.

        Q. On your website, you mention that a bamboo scrub would be a good option for someone with sensitive skin. Why is bamboo a safe option for people with sensitive skin, and do you have any recommendations on ingredients to combine with bamboo for maximum benefits of a bamboo scrub?
           A. This is outside my area of expertise.

        Bamboo supplement questions
        Q. Is there such a thing as bamboo extract?
           A. Yes, I am aware of one supplier who sells a 70 percent bamboo extract.

         




        From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 4:13:42 PM
        Subject: [pfaf] Juniper drink

         

        According to 

        Cornucopia,
        yes
        J virginiana branchlets and berriies are used...
        Juniperus sabina  is toxic,  
        so not all Junipers are OK.

        You have some seeds to spare ??

        Geir Flatabø

        ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        From: Peter knop <peterknop@...>
        Date: 2011/2/14
        Subject: Re: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com




        "juniper berry" covers a multitude of sins.  Are ALL juniper berries good to use? Juniperus virginiana tends to be loaded with berries, even this time of year (pale blue, small, takes two or three minutes to harvest a cup. Does it matter if a few needles are mixed in?  Maybe adds a bit of retzina flavor?


        From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 12:37:48 PM
        Subject: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink

         

        ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        From: Guttorm Flatabø <post@...>

        My son have posted a Buzz about Juniper berries,
        might be of interest to this list.....

        Geir Flatabø

        >  Link to this post:
        >  http://www.google.com/buzz/105377732872681737540/9JMhWmiFjXr/Place-about-2-cups-liter-of-juniper-berries-in-a
        >
        > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: "Place about 2 cups (½ liter) of juniper berries in a gallon (4 liter) jug, and fill it with water. No sugar or anything else required. Ferment for about a month, stirring or shaking and releasing pressure periodically. Truly delicious."
        >
        > Latest fermentation tip from wildfermentation.com
        >
        > Haven't tried myself, would like to use
        fresh juniper berries, and they're not that easy to get, I think.
        > Feb 7 John Bump: I spend a significant amount of time each year cutting out junipers. I might give this a try.
        > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: Cool, I recommend you keep everything except the berries sterile (and free from contamination such as chlorine). The shaking and stirring might also not be necessary if you use a container with airlock.
        > Feb 7 John Bump: I already have a fermentation jug with airlock from our disastrously abortive attempt to make vodka (aka "The House Of Stink") so I'm set as regards equipment. If I've time once juniper-berry season comes around I'll try it.




      • Infowolf1@aol.com
        are you talking the tall bamboo or the small bamboo? aren t some species problematic? Mary Christine Erikson In a message dated 2/14/2011 6:13:33 P.M. Pacific
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 14, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          are you talking the tall bamboo or the small bamboo?
           
          aren't some species problematic?
           
          Mary Christine Erikson
           
          In a message dated 2/14/2011 6:13:33 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, peterknop@... writes:
           

          Bamboo nutrition

          Sorry to have not replied to all the interesting and helpful comments and questions on my post on bamboo nutrition. But here are a few salient points and places to go for additional information.

                If I left out answering some questions, please write again.

          Below are a few notes on nutrition and related matters. I would like to thank everyone for their contributions on the subject.  As a farmer, I would agree with the person who wrote about alfalfa – a hard crop to deal with as a grower, and expensive to harvest for winter use, as opposed to bamboo which sits there all winter waiting to be eaten.

                One other forage crop not mentioned, but which produces very large quantities of forage during the growing season is willow (many different varieties of Salix), but an enormously fast grower, and livestock love it.

                Our goats eat all our bamboo varieties and are not picky like Pandas. Note that zoos feed a good deal of bamboo to their collections other than Pandas and will have lots of info on nutrition (I have lost/misplaced my file on this).  Protein does seem to run in the 15% to 20% range for mature leaves without undue fertilization or other efforts.  Note though that shoots have far lower nutritional value (see below).  Best nutrition is in mature leaves (6 months and older.)

               We generally harvest our bamboo at age two or three as we thin the stands. This gives greatest volume of material per square foot of grove. Can also clear cut swaths through a stand, but must be careful to keep a proper balance of remaining culms versus root mass so as to maximize regrowth. National Zoo in Washington overharvested their material and actually ran out a year or so ago.  They also are making the mistake of relying on one variety, which when it flowers (and then dies) will leave them in an emergency situation as they will have to search for new varieties which Pandas (and their other animals) will like,  and will be available (difficult in DC area as little bamboo there other than Aureosulcata which they currently use). We all can learn from  other’s mistakes.  Arrow bamboo (Japonica) is a poor food source due to short term flowering cycles which kill it off.

          Human values for % MDR of fresh shoots

          Raw shoots  per 100 gram

          Carbohydrate  6 g

          fibre  2 g

          Sugars 4 g

          Protein  3 g

          Vitamin C   7%

          Iron 3%

          Calcium 1.5%

          Note that shoots have lower content of just about everything, foliage increases dramatically in some cases.

          Foliage for forage

          Some interesting references:  I would note that the varieties chosen for the West Virginia (Zone 6ish I would guess) are not necessarily the best as they are less vigorous than other easily obtained varieties such as P rubromarginata and P. bissetii as well as P aureosulcata and P aureosulcata ‘spectablis’  Also, there are very low growing ( one to three foot) varieties which again, due to their evergreen nature and high protein content when mature, make excellent winter grazing when all else is gone.

          Nutritive value of bamboo as browse for livestock Article author query

          J.J. Halvorsona1 c1, K.A. Cassidaa1, K.E. Turnera1 and D.P. Beleskya1

          a1 Appalachian Farming Systems Research Center, ARS, USDA, Beaver, WV, USA.Abstract

          Small farms in Appalachia need management options that diversify income opportunities, are adaptable to new livestock management strategies, and help maintain environmental integrity. Plantings of temperate bamboo (Poaceae), including species native to West Virginia, were established to determine the potential nutritive value for small ruminants, such as goats (Capra hircus), at different times of the year. The bamboo species we evaluated, included several Phyllostachys spp., Semiarundiaria fastuosa and Arundinaria gigantea, were able to withstand Appalachian winter temperatures and retain some green leaves even in late winter. Although small differences were evident, the nutritive value was generally comparable among species and exhibited similar trends over the season. Total non-structural carbohydrates in bamboo leaves decreased throughout the growing season, and then remained stable or increased during winter. Conversely, crude protein was relatively low in young leaves compared to late season or over-wintered leaves. Concentrations of fiber and protein were sufficient to meet the maintenance needs of adult goats. The ability of bamboo to remain green and maintain the nutritive value throughout winter suggested that it has potential as winter forage for goats in central Appalachia. As an upright browse, bamboo may reduce the exposure of goats to gastrointestinal parasites. Perennial stands of temperate bamboo could prove to be a valuable, multiple-use crop suitable for Appalachian farm operations and easily adaptable to goat production systems.

            

          PJK Note to above:  Note that various animals prefer various species. Interesting aside, Pandas, well known for eating bamboo, also enjoy a hearty steak – they are vegetarian carnivores as are most bears, what I would probably call omnivores. It appears that like people, some pandas prefer one variety over another. P. aurea though seems to be not appreciated (but check with San Diego Zoo as well as other zoos.

           MISC:

          Bamboo leaf extract supplement by Ray Sahelian, M.D. Medicinal uses, latest research studies and review of benefits and side effects

          Bamboo leaf has been used in China as a food and herbal medicine. The botanical name for bamboo is bambusa vulgaris. There are more than a thousand species of bamboo around the globe. Bamboo is a rich source of silica. For more information on Chinese herbs.

          Bamboo leaf research
          The effect of bamboo leaves extract on hemorheology of normal rats
          Zhong Yao Cai. 2005 Feb;28(2):130-2. Department of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang
          Sixty rats were randomly divides into six groups. Blood stasis model was set up by sc isoprenaline, and different dose of bamboo leaf extract (15 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg) were iv. The effects of bamboo leaf extract  on rat's blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, FIB, ESR, TK, electrophoresis times and HCT were measured by automatic analysis system. Sixty mice were randomly divided into six groups, and the serum cholesterol of the high cholesterol's mice was obtained by eyepit vein and measured. The results showed that bamboo leaf extract (15 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg) could reduce blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, FIB, ESR, TK, HCT and increase the speed of electrophoresis time in blood adhesion model, and bamboo leaf extract (22.5 mg/kg, 45 mg/kg, 90 mg/kg) could significantly reduce serum
          cholesterol of the high cholesterol in mice.

          Commercial bamboo leaf extract
          Cactus Botanics bamboo leaves dry extract, manufactured through the process of water-ethanol extraction, membrane filtration chromatography, vacuum concentration and spray drying, is now available. Cactus Botanics has determined that the major components of its bamboo leaves extract are flavonoids, lactones and phenolic acids, with the flavonoids being mainly flavone glycosides, including orientin, homoorientin, isovitexin, vitexin and tricin. The lactones in the extract are mainly hydroxyl coumarin and its derivatives. The phenolic acids are mainly derivatives of cinnamic acid including chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid. The bamboo leaves extract is intended to be used in dietary supplements applications in capsule form. Because of its water solubility, it can also be used in other nutraceutical products such as milk powder and nutraceutical beverages. It has also been added to regular foods such as rice and noodle to increase nutrition values.

          Q. Bamboo is showing up in beauty products across the board, from hair care to facial scrubs to organic soaps, while bamboo leaf extract supplements claim to aid in anti-aging and strengthening bones and tissues. Are there any benefits of using topical bamboo leaf extract over ingesting it as a supplement (or vice versa)? Can a person eat bamboo and reap the same benefits of ingesting a bamboo leaf extract supplement?
             A. Using topical bamboo leaf extract on the skin is not likely to lead to much absorption of the active ingredients into the blood stream whereas ingesting it as a supplement  could lead to potential health benefits. Bamboo shoots are used in certain Asian dishes and broths, and are available in supermarkets in various sliced forms. Since there have not been studies comparing the health benefits of consuming bamboo shoots versus taking a leaf extract supplement, it is not easy to say which form is preferable but I suspect both are good options.

          Bamboo salt?
          We received this interesting email"
          Dear New Item Developing Manager, We knew in web site that you are the supplier of health food. We are pleased to introduce ourselves as the supplier of Bamboo Salt. Bamboo Salt is unique in the world. This bamboo Salt is manufactured under the instruction of Intangible Cultural Property. Sun-dried salt which is produced in clear west sea of Korea is put ! in Bamboos. Bamboos with sun-dried salt are burned and melted 850 – 1500 degree C in clay furnace by pine tree. Burned salt rock after burning is grinded. Grinded salt is put again in Bamboos and burned again in clay furnace. This process is executed up to 3-9 times. During final burning at 1,500 degree C, this salt is melted completely. All of noxious material like heavy metals in Salt is removed. 9 times or 3 times burned and melted Purple Bamboo Salt is good for health. Re : 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt.  We make 9 times or 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt for health care and 1 time burned Bamboo Salt for flavoring cooking normally. The price of 9 times burned and melted Bamboo Salt is very expensive although there are many benefits for health care. So, we think that it is some difficult to find new foreign markets. Therefore, we tested 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt many times and succeed in making similar to 9 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt. Surely, price is decreased greatly. Please consider this 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt for health care. And also, you can sell this Bamboo Salt as Ingredient to health food manufacturers using some salt. In Korea, our 9 times or 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt are used as Ingredient for Toothpaste, Soap, face mask pack, bakery, confectionery, vagina detergent and etc. So, please consider various markets.
             Re : 1 time burned Bamboo Salt. This is not melted. It is only 1 time burned Bamboo Salt. It is used for flavoring for cooking or Ingredient for some foods. We are now finding agent in your country. \if you are interests in our product, please feel free to contact us. Junghun Shim, Myju Ind., Corp. Tel. 82 2 523 9658.

          Bamboo in skin care
          Finely milled bamboo powder is used as an exfoliant in cleansers and scrubs. The smooth bamboo particles are less harsh than the scraggly, uneven grains made from salt and nuts, making it safer and less irritating to sensitive skin.

          Q. On your website, you mention that a bamboo scrub would be a good option for someone with sensitive skin. Why is bamboo a safe option for people with sensitive skin, and do you have any recommendations on ingredients to combine with bamboo for maximum benefits of a bamboo scrub?
             A. This is outside my area of expertise.

          Bamboo supplement questions
          Q. Is there such a thing as bamboo extract?
             A. Yes, I am aware of one supplier who sells a 70 percent bamboo extract.




          From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 4:13:42 PM
          Subject: [pfaf] Juniper drink

           

          According to 

          Cornucopia,
          yes
          J virginiana branchlets and berriies are used...
          Juniperus sabina  is toxic,  
          so not all Junipers are OK.

          You have some seeds to spare ??

          Geir Flatabø

          ---------- Forwarded message ----------
          From: Peter knop <peterknop@...>
          Date: 2011/2/14
          Subject: Re: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com




          "juniper berry" covers a multitude of sins.  Are ALL juniper berries good to use? Juniperus virginiana tends to be loaded with berries, even this time of year (pale blue, small, takes two or three minutes to harvest a cup. Does it matter if a few needles are mixed in?  Maybe adds a bit of retzina flavor?


          From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 12:37:48 PM
          Subject: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink

           

          ---------- Forwarded message ----------
          From: Guttorm Flatabø <post@...>

          My son have posted a Buzz about Juniper berries,
          might be of interest to this list.....

          Geir Flatabø

          >  Link to this post:
          >  http://www.google.com/buzz/105377732872681737540/9JMhWmiFjXr/Place-about-2-cups-liter-of-juniper-berries-in-a
          >
          > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: "Place about 2 cups (½ liter) of juniper berries in a gallon (4 liter) jug, and fill it with water. No sugar or anything else required. Ferment for about a month, stirring or shaking and releasing pressure periodically. Truly delicious."
          >
          > Latest fermentation tip from wildfermentation.com
          >
          > Haven't tried myself, would like to use fresh juniper berries, and they're not that easy to get, I think.
          > Feb 7 John Bump: I spend a significant amount of time each year cutting out junipers. I might give this a try.
          > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: Cool, I recommend you keep everything except the berries sterile (and free from contamination such as chlorine). The shaking and stirring might also not be necessary if you use a container with airlock.
          > Feb 7 John Bump: I already have a fermentation jug with airlock from our disastrously abortive attempt to make vodka (aka "The House Of Stink") so I'm set as regards equipment. If I've time once juniper-berry season comes around I'll try it.




        • Elaine Sommers
          Another fermented drink made this way is apple juice. I made 2 batches from windfalls, crab apples, and any other apples that came my way from neighbours
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 15, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Another fermented drink made this way is apple juice. I made 2 batches from windfalls, crab apples, and any other apples that came my way from neighbours weighed down with them. All I did was to chop them roughly and put through a liquidizer first with enough water to make it spin and then put into a fermenting bucket. No more water was necessary because of the amount needed in the liquidizer, so this is a good guide. Because the weather was very cold it didn't ferment very quickly. It took about 3 weeks to become really 'heady', after which I strained it through muslin and bottled it. I put a teaspoon of sugar in each bottle first to encourage further fizz but it didn't need any sweetening at all. Very easy and very cheap. And very tasty!
             
            Blessings,
            Elaine.
             
            PS. You need a glass handy when unscrewing the bottle top!

            "We are shaped and fashioned by what we love"
              Goethe
             
            "Losing your mind can be a peak experience!"
              Jane Wagner
             
            "Our nature lies in movement; complete calm is death."
              Blaise Pascal
             
            ". . . the greatest peril of life lies in the fact that human food consists entirely of souls. All the creatures that we have to kill to eat, all those that we have to strike down and destroy to make clothes for ourselves, have souls, souls that do not perish with the body . . . All that exists lives."
             
            from 'Shaman, the wounded healer' by J. Halifax, 1982




             

            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            From: cyndeesings@...
            Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2011 21:43:18 +0000
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Juniper drink (other health uses for juniper berries)

             
            The drink sounds good. Remember, juniper berries are used in making gin! Here in Germany, juniper berries (Wacholderbeeren) are used in several favorite dishes, as well as in a lot of folk remedies, especially for the pain of arthritis and rheumatism, and anything involving the kidneys (they are a strong diuretic). You can just take the fresh or dried berries, crush them a bit) tie them up in a cheesecloth, and put them in your bath. Ummmm. You can also make an ointment with them to rub into sore joints. This site tells how:
            (article menu on the lower right side of the first page).
            I imagine one could crush a few juniper berries to put into that gin-and-raisin arthritis cure to make it even stronger.  Anyone try it yet?
            Have fun!
            Oh yes -- one of my other German folk cures I learned here is to eat a Nasturtium leaf or two every day to keep colds away...the sulpher in them helps disinfect the airways, and builds up the immune system.  And the leaves and flowers taste great in salads!
            Cynhilde,
            American opera singer, 
            have lived in Germany 24 years now.

            --- On Mon, 2/14/11, Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:

            From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
            Subject: [pfaf] Juniper drink
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, February 14, 2011, 10:13 PM

             

            According to 

            Cornucopia,
            yes
            J virginiana branchlets and berriies are used...
            Juniperus sabina  is toxic,  
            so not all Junipers are OK.

            You have some seeds to spare ??

            Geir Flatabø

            ---------- Forwarded message ----------
            From: Peter knop <peterknop@...>
            Date: 2011/2/14
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com




            "juniper berry" covers a multitude of sins.  Are ALL juniper berries good to use? Juniperus virginiana tends to be loaded with berries, even this time of year (pale blue, small, takes two or three minutes to harvest a cup. Does it matter if a few needles are mixed in?  Maybe adds a bit of retzina flavor?


            From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 12:37:48 PM
            Subject: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink

             
            ---------- Forwarded message ----------
            From: Guttorm Flatabø <post@...>

            My son have posted a Buzz about Juniper berries,
            might be of interest to this list.....

            Geir Flatabø

            >  Link to this post:
            >  http://www.google.com/buzz/105377732872681737540/9JMhWmiFjXr/Place-about-2-cups-liter-of-juniper-berries-in-a
            >
            > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: "Place about 2 cups (½ liter) of juniper berries in a gallon (4 liter) jug, and fill it with water. No sugar or anything else required. Ferment for about a month, stirring or shaking and releasing pressure periodically. Truly delicious."
            >
            > Latest fermentation tip from wildfermentation.com
            >
            > Haven't tried myself, would like to use fresh juniper berries, and they're not that easy to get, I think.
            > Feb 7 John Bump: I spend a significant amount of time each year cutting out junipers. I might give this a try.
            > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: Cool, I recommend you keep everything except the berries sterile (and free from contamination such as chlorine). The shaking and stirring might also not be necessary if you use a container with airlock.
            > Feb 7 John Bump: I already have a fermentation jug with airlock from our disastrously abortive attempt to make vodka (aka "The House Of Stink") so I'm set as regards equipment. If I've time once juniper-berry season comes around I'll try it.





          • Peter knop
            I am speaking of all  types.  No bamboo is problematic unless planted in someone s tiny yard in the city or close to a prized plant in a large garden. . Our
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 15, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              I am speaking of all  types.  No bamboo is problematic unless planted in someone's tiny yard in the city or close to a prized plant in a large garden. . Our groves expand at about 3 feet per year on average, we wish it were more. Rubromarginata and bissetii do about 4 feet per year.  As bamboo very seldom flowers (in general once every 50 to 100 years) and most bmboo seeds are quite heavy, and many basically sterile, they are not a threat like many of the problematic plants such as purple loosestrife, thistle, johnston grass, etc. etc.


              From: "Infowolf1@..." <Infowolf1@...>
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 11:11:48 PM
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] Bamboo nutrition answers to questions

               

              are you talking the tall bamboo or the small bamboo?
               
              aren't some species problematic?
               
              Mary Christine Erikson
               
              In a message dated 2/14/2011 6:13:33 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, peterknop@... writes:
               

              Bamboo nutrition

              Sorry to have not replied to all the interesting and helpful comments and questions on my post on bamboo nutrition. But here are a few salient points and places to go for additional information.

                    If I left out answering some questions, please write again.

              Below are a few notes on nutrition and related matters. I would like to thank everyone for their contributions on the subject.  As a farmer, I would agree with the person who wrote about alfalfa – a hard crop to deal with as a grower, and expensive to harvest for winter use, as opposed to bamboo which sits there all winter waiting to be eaten.

                    One other forage crop not mentioned, but which produces very large quantities of forage during the growing season is willow (many different varieties of Salix), but an enormously fast grower, and livestock love it.

                    Our goats eat all our bamboo varieties and are not picky like Pandas. Note that zoos feed a good deal of bamboo to their collections other than Pandas and will have lots of info on nutrition (I have lost/misplaced my file on this).  Protein does seem to run in the 15% to 20% range for mature leaves without undue fertilization or other efforts.  Note though that shoots have far lower nutritional value (see below).  Best nutrition is in mature leaves (6 months and older.)

                   We generally harvest our bamboo at age two or three as we thin the stands. This gives greatest volume of material per square foot of grove. Can also clear cut swaths through a stand, but must be careful to keep a proper balance of remaining culms versus root mass so as to maximize regrowth. National Zoo in Washington overharvested their material and actually ran out a year or so ago.  They also are making the mistake of relying on one variety, which when it flowers (and then dies) will leave them in an emergency situation as they will have to search for new varieties which Pandas (and their other animals) will like,  and will be available (difficult in DC area as little bamboo there other than Aureosulcata which they currently use). We all can learn from  other’s mistakes.  Arrow bamboo (Japonica) is a poor food source due to short term flowering cycles which kill it off.

              Human values for % MDR of fresh shoots

              Raw shoots  per 100 gram

              Carbohydrate  6 g

              fibre  2 g

              Sugars 4 g

              Protein  3 g

              Vitamin C   7%

              Iron 3%

              Calcium 1.5%

              Note that shoots have lower content of just about everything, foliage increases dramatically in some cases.

              Foliage for forage

              Some interesting references:  I would note that the varieties chosen for the West Virginia (Zone 6ish I would guess) are not necessarily the best as they are less vigorous than other easily obtained varieties such as P rubromarginata and P. bissetii as well as P aureosulcata and P aureosulcata ‘spectablis’  Also, there are very low growing ( one to three foot) varieties which again, due to their evergreen nature and high protein content when mature, make excellent winter grazing when all else is gone.

              Nutritive value of bamboo as browse for livestock Article author query

              J.J. Halvorsona1 c1, K.A. Cassidaa1, K.E. Turnera1 and D.P. Beleskya1

              a1 Appalachian Farming Systems Research Center, ARS, USDA, Beaver, WV, USA.Abstract

              Small farms in Appalachia need management options that diversify income opportunities, are adaptable to new livestock management strategies, and help maintain environmental integrity. Plantings of temperate bamboo (Poaceae), including species native to West Virginia, were established to determine the potential nutritive value for small ruminants, such as goats (Capra hircus), at different times of the year. The bamboo species we evaluated, included several Phyllostachys spp., Semiarundiaria fastuosa and Arundinaria gigantea, were able to withstand Appalachian winter temperatures and retain some green leaves even in late winter. Although small differences were evident, the nutritive value was generally comparable among species and exhibited similar trends over the season. Total non-structural carbohydrates in bamboo leaves decreased throughout the growing season, and then remained stable or increased during winter. Conversely, crude protein was relatively low in young leaves compared to late season or over-wintered leaves. Concentrations of fiber and protein were sufficient to meet the maintenance needs of adult goats. The ability of bamboo to remain green and maintain the nutritive value throughout winter suggested that it has potential as winter forage for goats in central Appalachia. As an upright browse, bamboo may reduce the exposure of goats to gastrointestinal parasites. Perennial stands of temperate bamboo could prove to be a valuable, multiple-use crop suitable for Appalachian farm operations and easily adaptable to goat production systems.

                

              PJK Note to above:  Note that various animals prefer various species. Interesting aside, Pandas, well known for eating bamboo, also enjoy a hearty steak – they are vegetarian carnivores as are most bears, what I would probably call omnivores. It appears that like people, some pandas prefer one variety over another. P. aurea though seems to be not appreciated (but check with San Diego Zoo as well as other zoos.

               MISC:

              Bamboo leaf extract supplement by Ray Sahelian, M.D. Medicinal uses, latest research studies and review of benefits and side effects

              Bamboo leaf has been used in China as a food and herbal medicine. The botanical name for bamboo is bambusa vulgaris. There are more than a thousand species of bamboo around the globe. Bamboo is a rich source of silica. For more information on Chinese herbs.

              Bamboo leaf research
              The effect of bamboo leaves extract on hemorheology of normal rats
              Zhong Yao Cai. 2005 Feb;28(2):130-2. Department of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang
              Sixty rats were randomly divides into six groups. Blood stasis model was set up by sc isoprenaline, and different dose of bamboo leaf extract (15 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg) were iv. The effects of bamboo leaf extract  on rat's blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, FIB, ESR, TK, electrophoresis times and HCT were measured by automatic analysis system. Sixty mice were randomly divided into six groups, and the serum cholesterol of the high cholesterol's mice was obtained by eyepit vein and measured. The results showed that bamboo leaf extract (15 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg) could reduce blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, FIB, ESR, TK, HCT and increase the speed of electrophoresis time in blood adhesion model, and bamboo leaf extract (22.5 mg/kg, 45 mg/kg, 90 mg/kg) could significantly reduce serum
              cholesterol of the high cholesterol in mice.

              Commercial bamboo leaf extract
              Cactus Botanics bamboo leaves dry extract, manufactured through the process of water-ethanol extraction, membrane filtration chromatography, vacuum concentration and spray drying, is now available. Cactus Botanics has determined that the major components of its bamboo leaves extract are flavonoids, lactones and phenolic acids, with the flavonoids being mainly flavone glycosides, including orientin, homoorientin, isovitexin, vitexin and tricin. The lactones in the extract are mainly hydroxyl coumarin and its derivatives. The phenolic acids are mainly derivatives of cinnamic acid including chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid. The bamboo leaves extract is intended to be used in dietary supplements applications in capsule form. Because of its water solubility, it can also be used in other nutraceutical products such as milk powder and nutraceutical beverages. It has also been added to regular foods such as rice and noodle to increase nutrition values.

              Q. Bamboo is showing up in beauty products across the board, from hair care to facial scrubs to organic soaps, while bamboo leaf extract supplements claim to aid in anti-aging and strengthening bones and tissues. Are there any benefits of using topical bamboo leaf extract over ingesting it as a supplement (or vice versa)? Can a person eat bamboo and reap the same benefits of ingesting a bamboo leaf extract supplement?
                 A. Using topical bamboo leaf extract on the skin is not likely to lead to much absorption of the active ingredients into the blood stream whereas ingesting it as a supplement  could lead to potential health benefits. Bamboo shoots are used in certain Asian dishes and broths, and are available in supermarkets in various sliced forms. Since there have not been studies comparing the health benefits of consuming bamboo shoots versus taking a leaf extract supplement, it is not easy to say which form is preferable but I suspect both are good options.

              Bamboo salt?
              We received this interesting email"
              Dear New Item Developing Manager, We knew in web site that you are the supplier of health food. We are pleased to introduce ourselves as the supplier of Bamboo Salt. Bamboo Salt is unique in the world. This bamboo Salt is manufactured under the instruction of Intangible Cultural Property. Sun-dried salt which is produced in clear west sea of Korea is put ! in Bamboos. Bamboos with sun-dried salt are burned and melted 850 – 1500 degree C in clay furnace by pine tree. Burned salt rock after burning is grinded. Grinded salt is put again in Bamboos and burned again in clay furnace. This process is executed up to 3-9 times. During final burning at 1,500 degree C, this salt is melted completely. All of noxious material like heavy metals in Salt is removed. 9 times or 3 times burned and melted Purple Bamboo Salt is good for health. Re : 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt.  We make 9 times or 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt for health care and 1 time burned Bamboo Salt for flavoring cooking normally. The price of 9 times burned and melted Bamboo Salt is very expensive although there are many benefits for health care. So, we think that it is some difficult to find new foreign markets. Therefore, we tested 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt many times and succeed in making similar to 9 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt. Surely, price is decreased greatly. Please consider this 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt for health care. And also, you can sell this Bamboo Salt as Ingredient to health food manufacturers using some salt. In Korea, our 9 times or 3 times burned & melted Bamboo Salt are used as Ingredient for Toothpaste, Soap, face mask pack, bakery, confectionery, vagina detergent and etc. So, please consider various markets.
                 Re : 1 time burned Bamboo Salt. This is not melted. It is only 1 time burned Bamboo Salt. It is used for flavoring for cooking or Ingredient for some foods. We are now finding agent in your country. \if you are interests in our product, please feel free to contact us. Junghun Shim, Myju Ind., Corp. Tel. 82 2 523 9658.

              Bamboo in skin care
              Finely milled bamboo powder is used as an exfoliant in cleansers and scrubs. The smooth bamboo particles are less harsh than the scraggly, uneven grains made from salt and nuts, making it safer and less irritating to sensitive skin.

              Q. On your website, you mention that a bamboo scrub would be a good option for someone with sensitive skin. Why is bamboo a safe option for people with sensitive skin, and do you have any recommendations on ingredients to combine with bamboo for maximum benefits of a bamboo scrub?
                 A. This is outside my area of expertise.

              Bamboo supplement questions
              Q. Is there such a thing as bamboo extract?
                 A. Yes, I am aware of one supplier who sells a 70 percent bamboo extract.




              From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 4:13:42 PM
              Subject: [pfaf] Juniper drink

               

              According to 

              Cornucopia,
              yes
              J virginiana branchlets and berriies are used...
              Juniperus sabina  is toxic,  
              so not all Junipers are OK.

              You have some seeds to spare ??

              Geir Flatabø

              ---------- Forwarded message ----------
              From: Peter knop <peterknop@...>
              Date: 2011/2/14
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com




              "juniper berry" covers a multitude of sins.  Are ALL juniper berries good to use? Juniperus virginiana tends to be loaded with berries, even this time of year (pale blue, small, takes two or three minutes to harvest a cup. Does it matter if a few needles are mixed in?  Maybe adds a bit of retzina flavor?


              From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, February 14, 2011 12:37:48 PM
              Subject: [pfaf] Fwd: uniper drink

               

              ---------- Forwarded message ----------
              From: Guttorm Flatabø <post@...>

              My son have posted a Buzz about Juniper berries,
              might be of interest to this list.....

              Geir Flatabø

              >  Link to this post:
              >  http://www.google.com/buzz/105377732872681737540/9JMhWmiFjXr/Place-about-2-cups-liter-of-juniper-berries-in-a
              >
              > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: "Place about 2 cups (½ liter) of juniper berries in a gallon (4 liter) jug, and fill it with water. No sugar or anything else required. Ferment for about a month, stirring or shaking and releasing pressure periodically. Truly delicious."
              >
              > Latest fermentation tip from wildfermentation.com
              >
              > Haven't tried myself, would like to use fresh juniper berries, and they're not that easy to get, I think.
              > Feb 7 John Bump: I spend a significant amount of time each year cutting out junipers. I might give this a try.
              > Feb 7 Guttorm Flatabø: Cool, I recommend you keep everything except the berries sterile (and free from contamination such as chlorine). The shaking and stirring might also not be necessary if you use a container with airlock.
              > Feb 7 John Bump: I already have a fermentation jug with airlock from our disastrously abortive attempt to make vodka (aka "The House Of Stink") so I'm set as regards equipment. If I've time once juniper-berry season comes around I'll try it.




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