Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Uusing used fridges as raised beds

Expand Messages
  • giantgardener
    There was an article in a magazine once (10 yrs ago?) about a man who built a beautiful home entirely from scrap materials. He also built terraced
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      There was an article in a magazine once (10 yrs ago?) about a man who built a beautiful home entirely from scrap materials. He also built terraced mountainside permie gardens out of used fridges he obtained from the tip, even growing fruit trees in them. He additionally used them for goat and chicken sheds, too. Can't remember which mag it was in, but the man was from either Switzerland or Germany.

      Bob Flowerdew, a British gardening guru, also has gardening uses for them, as water buts and storage.

      That's all I've ever been able to find so far. Does anyone have further information on this type of gardening? Could be very useful for handicapped gardening. Am wondering about cautions using fridges.

      Any references / info on fridge gardens would be useful!
    • Erich Enke
      I m generally cautious about repurposing today s products. Just because they re tested to not leech certain hazardous chemicals under certain conditions
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        I'm generally cautious about repurposing today's products.  Just because they're tested to not leech certain hazardous chemicals under certain conditions doesn't mean that they don't actually leech other hazardous chemicals, or that they won't leech them under different circumstances.  Consider the 89% cadmium jewelery being sold by Walmart these days, basically poison if ingested, but allowed because, after all, who swallows jewelery?  Consider the recycling #1 plastic bottles (like water bottles) that are mostly fine to use for their intended purpose (one-time food storage), but upon reuse start leeching hazardous chemicals.  Just because a refrigerator doesn't release large amounts of (human) toxins in typical intended use doesn't mean that it wouldn't release (human or plant) toxins if used to contain soil, and your plant's nutrition directly affects your nutrition.

        I'm not trying to be alarmist.  It also might be really good for the plant.  There's just a lot we don't know about that sort of setup.

        Erich

        On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 5:44 AM, giantgardener <giantgardener@...> wrote:
         

        There was an article in a magazine once (10 yrs ago?) about a man who built a beautiful home entirely from scrap materials. He also built terraced mountainside permie gardens out of used fridges he obtained from the tip, even growing fruit trees in them. He additionally used them for goat and chicken sheds, too. Can't remember which mag it was in, but the man was from either Switzerland or Germany.

        Bob Flowerdew, a British gardening guru, also has gardening uses for them, as water buts and storage.

        That's all I've ever been able to find so far. Does anyone have further information on this type of gardening? Could be very useful for handicapped gardening. Am wondering about cautions using fridges.

        Any references / info on fridge gardens would be useful!


      • giantgardener
        Many, many excellent eye opening points to consider. Why, thank you! Now I m wondering if that man in Switzerland or Germany is still healthy? And you d be
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 2, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Many, many excellent eye opening points to consider. Why, thank you! Now I'm wondering if that man in Switzerland or Germany is still healthy?

          And you'd be stunned at how many swallow jewelery in my business!


          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Erich Enke <erich.enke@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm generally cautious about repurposing today's products. Just because
          > they're tested to not leech certain hazardous chemicals under certain
          > conditions doesn't mean that they don't actually leech other hazardous
          > chemicals, or that they won't leech them under different circumstances.
          > Consider the 89% cadmium jewelery being sold by Walmart these days,
          > basically poison if ingested, but allowed because, after all, who swallows
          > jewelery? Consider the recycling #1 plastic bottles (like water bottles)
          > that are mostly fine to use for their intended purpose (one-time food
          > storage), but upon reuse start leeching hazardous chemicals. Just because a
          > refrigerator doesn't release large amounts of (human) toxins in typical
          > intended use doesn't mean that it wouldn't release (human or plant) toxins
          > if used to contain soil, and your plant's nutrition directly affects your
          > nutrition.
          >
          > I'm not trying to be alarmist. It also might be really good for the plant.
          > There's just a lot we don't know about that sort of setup.
          >
          > Erich
          >
          > On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 5:44 AM, giantgardener <giantgardener@...>wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > There was an article in a magazine once (10 yrs ago?) about a man who built
          > > a beautiful home entirely from scrap materials. He also built terraced
          > > mountainside permie gardens out of used fridges he obtained from the tip,
          > > even growing fruit trees in them. He additionally used them for goat and
          > > chicken sheds, too. Can't remember which mag it was in, but the man was from
          > > either Switzerland or Germany.
          > >
          > > Bob Flowerdew, a British gardening guru, also has gardening uses for them,
          > > as water buts and storage.
          > >
          > > That's all I've ever been able to find so far. Does anyone have further
          > > information on this type of gardening? Could be very useful for handicapped
          > > gardening. Am wondering about cautions using fridges.
          > >
          > > Any references / info on fridge gardens would be useful!
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • limitcycle@ymail.com
          yea; hazardous chem, life cycle, and load bearing aspects could complicate it
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 20, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            yea; hazardous chem, life cycle, and load bearing aspects could complicate it

            --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "giantgardener" <giantgardener@...> wrote:
            >
            > There was an article in a magazine once (10 yrs ago?) about a man who built a beautiful home entirely from scrap materials. He also built terraced mountainside permie gardens out of used fridges he obtained from the tip, even growing fruit trees in them. He additionally used them for goat and chicken sheds, too. Can't remember which mag it was in, but the man was from either Switzerland or Germany.
            >
            > Bob Flowerdew, a British gardening guru, also has gardening uses for them, as water buts and storage.
            >
            > That's all I've ever been able to find so far. Does anyone have further information on this type of gardening? Could be very useful for handicapped gardening. Am wondering about cautions using fridges.
            >
            > Any references / info on fridge gardens would be useful!
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.