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Re: [pfaf] Re: fermented wild greens ?

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  • Gail Lloyd
    The reason I use whey (from yogurt) to ferment is that it has probiotics, which I think is advantageous if the recipe calls for that type of fermentation. 
    Message 1 of 25 , Dec 3, 2009
      The reason I use whey (from yogurt) to ferment is that it has probiotics, which I think is advantageous if the recipe calls for that type of fermentation.  Any veggie can be used.  You can use goat yogurt, too, which I think is better than cow yogurt.  Yogurt is easy to make...just bring 4 c milk (goat or cow) almost to boil, take off heat & put in glass bowl & cover w/ towel for 50 minutes, then mix in 2 T plain yogurt mixed with 2 T milk & add to your cooled milk.  Store in a thermos that is covered with a folded towel or washcloth & let sit about 8-10 hours or until thickened, then refrigerate.
      Gail

      --- On Sun, 11/29/09, Laury Carter <claury@...> wrote:

      From: Laury Carter <claury@...>
      Subject: [pfaf] Re: fermented wild greens ?
      To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:39 PM

       
      Thank you all so much for this interesting discussion! I have been making
      kimchee for years, thanks to having the pleasure of hosting S. Korean
      students, but I thought the fermentation was related to the cabbage and bok
      choy only.

      Clearly I didn't think very hard! btw, I find that sea salt works well but
      iodized salt leaves a bitter taste.

      I am looking forward to using this new info.

      Thanks!
      Laury


    • Geir Flatabø
      In literature of what eskimos and Lappish people have been eating.......... fermenting wild greens like Rhodiola , Cochlearia and Angelica are mentioned in
      Message 2 of 25 , Dec 3, 2009
        In literature of what eskimos and Lappish people  have been eating..........
        fermenting wild greens like Rhodiola , Cochlearia and Angelica  are mentioned in reindeer or seal stomachs with reindeer milk... (Porsild ?).
         
        Geir Flatabø

        2009/12/4 Gail Lloyd <gardenchick1949@...>


        The reason I use whey (from yogurt) to ferment is that it has probiotics, which I think is advantageous if the recipe calls for that type of fermentation.  Any veggie can be used.  You can use goat yogurt, too, which I think is better than cow yogurt.  Yogurt is easy to make...just bring 4 c milk (goat or cow) almost to boil, take off heat & put in glass bowl & cover w/ towel for 50 minutes, then mix in 2 T plain yogurt mixed with 2 T milk & add to your cooled milk.  Store in a thermos that is covered with a folded towel or washcloth & let sit about 8-10 hours or until thickened, then refrigerate.
        Gail

        --- On Sun, 11/29/09, Laury Carter <claury@...> wrote:

        From: Laury Carter <claury@...>
        Subject: [pfaf] Re: fermented wild greens ?
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:39 PM

         
        Thank you all so much for this interesting discussion! I have been making
        kimchee for years, thanks to having the pleasure of hosting S. Korean
        students, but I thought the fermentation was related to the cabbage and bok
        choy only.

        Clearly I didn't think very hard! btw, I find that sea salt works well but
        iodized salt leaves a bitter taste.

        I am looking forward to using this new info.

        Thanks!
        Laury





      • Ossi Kakko
        Yes, and eastern finnish shifting cultivators used to ferment at least Urtica dioicea, Cirsium heterophyllum, C. Arvense and Heracleum sibiricum just the way
        Message 3 of 25 , Dec 4, 2009
          Yes, and eastern finnish shifting cultivators used to ferment at least
          Urtica dioicea, Cirsium heterophyllum, C. Arvense and Heracleum sibiricum
          just the way like the cherokee or nepalese - without milk - just the
          veggies - and they're even more full of probiotics too ...

          Ossi Kakko


          > In literature of what eskimos and Lappish people have been
          > eating.......... fermenting wild greens like Rhodiola , Cochlearia and
          > Angelica are mentioned in reindeer or seal stomachs with reindeer
          > milk... (Porsild ?).
          >
          > Geir Flatabø
          >
          > 2009/12/4 Gail Lloyd <gardenchick1949@...>
          >
          >>
          >>
          >> The reason I use whey (from yogurt) to ferment is that it has
          >> probiotics, which I think is advantageous if the recipe calls for that
          >> type
          >> of fermentation. Any veggie can be used. You can use goat yogurt, too,
          >> which I think is better than cow yogurt. Yogurt is easy to make...just
          >> bring 4 c milk (goat or cow) almost to boil, take off heat & put in
          >> glass
          >> bowl & cover w/ towel for 50 minutes, then mix in 2 T plain yogurt mixed
          >> with 2 T milk & add to your cooled milk. Store in a thermos that is
          >> covered
          >> with a folded towel or washcloth & let sit about 8-10 hours or until
          >> thickened, then refrigerate.
          >> Gail
          >>
          >> --- On *Sun, 11/29/09, Laury Carter <claury@...>* wrote:
          >>
          >>
          >> From: Laury Carter <claury@...>
          >> Subject: [pfaf] Re: fermented wild greens ?
          >> To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          >> Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:39 PM
          >>
          >>
          >> Thank you all so much for this interesting discussion! I have been
          >> making
          >> kimchee for years, thanks to having the pleasure of hosting S. Korean
          >> students, but I thought the fermentation was related to the cabbage and
          >> bok
          >>
          >> choy only.
          >>
          >> Clearly I didn't think very hard! btw, I find that sea salt works well
          >> but
          >> iodized salt leaves a bitter taste.
          >>
          >> I am looking forward to using this new info.
          >>
          >> Thanks!
          >> Laury
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
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