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Re: There seems to be a distinct LACK of information on guilds/interaction matrix???

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  • simon
    As the one who started this thread thought I should reply. Thanks for the info those of you have posted. Ludwig - yes guilds and interaction matrices are not
    Message 1 of 26 , Dec 1, 2009
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      As the one who started this thread thought I should reply. Thanks for the info those of you have posted. Ludwig - yes guilds and interaction matrices are not 'simple puzzle games' - that much I know. And yes, info will be specific to the bio-regions where the research was done. But I also think you are fudging the issue. Plants have many varied uses and cannot be simply reduced to a paragraph on 'use chamomile as a muscle relaxant' etc etc. But one has to start SOMEWHERE. One needs some 'starters'.

      The PFAF database is not comprehensive but it is a great starting base. That was my point- I have not found such information relating to guilds. As said I don't necessarily expect it for free and i don't quite share the view that those in the Permaculture movement are cynically 'hoarding' their knowledge inside expensive courses. I think it is probably more a case of the science being in its infancy and people not getting around to fully systematizing this knowledge. You might as well to criticise indiginous tibes for not broadcasting their plant knowledge over the internet- maybe they're too busy :-)

      Ideally this would have been done before but now might be the time as the movement seems to be just beginning to hit a critical mass and more people will be coming on board looking for 'starters'.

      > > >
      > > Hi Simon,
      > >
      > > Maybe I understand your question wrong but I see it like this:
      > >
      > > I find that sometimes people expect forest gardening to be like a jigsaw
      > > puzzle. Where plants are jigsaw pieces that fit together to make a picture.
      > > But it doesn't work like that. There are so many factors involved in
      > > determining which variety of plants to put where and in which
      > > combination: water, light, light what time of day, your taste buds,
      > > position to the house, neighbouring plants, people, pollution, soil
      > > type, wind, invasive plants and animals, diseases, pests, law, .... and
      > > the list goes on....
      > >
      > > I think choosing the right plants is more like a pokemon game where each
      > > character or plant has its own characteristics. And depending on the
      > > location it is for the player or gardener to discover and learn how to
      > > play the plants best. There are some clear and obvious rules and logical
      > > themes, but in the end no game is ever the same.
      > >
      > > There are a few good books out there, Patrick whitefields: 'How to make
      > > a forest garden' being my favorite. Or 'the earth care manual' is just
      > > delicious.
      > >
      > > But I always end up back at the Pfaf Database. The best there is.
      > >
      > > Many many thanks guy's for years and years of work putting up for free
      > > for everyone to use. (please feel free to send voluntary donations to
      > > them via paypal, info on the website.)
      > >
      > > Ludwig
      > >
      >
    • mIEKAL aND
      We use the shoots like asparagus in the spring & have dried the stalks & used them to make many panpipes & flutes.... Also be careful with polygonum & goats
      Message 2 of 26 , Dec 1, 2009
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        We use the shoots like asparagus in the spring & have dried the stalks & used them to make many panpipes & flutes....  Also be careful with polygonum & goats because they'll eat the stuff until they explode....

        ~mIEKAL

        On Tue, Dec 1, 2009 at 9:30 AM, bozomind <bozomind@...> wrote:
         

        Although Japanese knotweed is invasive, the root is a well known source for the nutraceutical resveratrol and the flowers are loved by bees! Also, since it grows so prolifically, you can use it for a green mulch/compost. I certainly wouldn't recommend propagating it, but once it's there, it is handy multi-use plant!

      • Geir Flatabø
        2009/12/1 mIEKAL aND ... Could you elaborate how you make the panpipes and flutes !?? Geir Flatabø ... 2009/12/1 mIEKAL aND
        Message 3 of 26 , Dec 2, 2009
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          2009/12/1 mIEKAL aND <qazingulaza@...>


          We use the shoots like asparagus in the spring & have dried the stalks & used them to make many panpipes & flutes.... 
          Could you elaborate
          how you make the panpipes and flutes !??
           
          Geir Flatabø
           
          Also be careful with polygonum & goats because they'll eat the stuff until they explode....

          ~mIEKAL


          On Tue, Dec 1, 2009 at 9:30 AM, bozomind <bozomind@...> wrote:
           

          Although Japanese knotweed is invasive, the root is a well known source for the nutraceutical resveratrol and the flowers are loved by bees! Also, since it grows so prolifically, you can use it for a green mulch/compost. I certainly wouldn't recommend propagating it, but once it's there, it is handy multi-use plant!




        • mIEKAL aND
          I should make it clear that I m talking about Giant Japanese Knotweed, which around here gets to be 10-14 feet tall. Stalks are harvested in October. The
          Message 4 of 26 , Dec 2, 2009
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            I should make it clear that I'm talking about Giant Japanese Knotweed, which around here gets to be 10-14 feet tall.  Stalks are harvested in October.  The first step is to break thru the culms so that no moisture is stuck inside the tubes.  These will then dry to be just like bamboo (tho not nearly as strong).  For panpipes tubes are cut to different lengths & we use dried stalks of cupplant to hold a row of tubes together.  Then by using homemade sinew everything is wrapped up.  I completely wild-crafted music instrument.  To some degree the panpipes can be tuned by adjusting the length of the tubes.  Final touch is to put beeswax on the cut end of the tubes to make them easier on the lips.  I used to have some photos up on the permaculture wiki but I see the site is no longer up.

            ~mIEKAL



            On Wed, Dec 2, 2009 at 4:48 AM, Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:
             



            2009/12/1 mIEKAL aND <qazingulaza@...>



            We use the shoots like asparagus in the spring & have dried the stalks & used them to make many panpipes & flutes.... 
            Could you elaborate
            how you make the panpipes and flutes !??
             
            Geir Flatabø
          • listenstohorses
            No way!!   try    http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums/2266_0/tinkering-with-this-site/may-i-suggest-wiki-link-collection-bestof   ...   I used to
            Message 5 of 26 , Dec 2, 2009
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              No way!!   try
               
               


              --- On Wed, 12/2/09, mIEKAL aND <qazingulaza@...> wrote:

                I used to have some photos up on the permaculture wiki but I see the site is no longer up.

              ~mIEKAL

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