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Info on Guilds

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  • Denise For Peace
    The work of developing guilds is a long-term and local endeavor. The principles are to select and site plants that provide human food (and other products)
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 25, 2009
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      The work of developing guilds is a long-term and local endeavor.
      The principles are to select and site plants that provide human food (and other products) along with the leguminous, nutrient-accumulating, mulch-generating, shade-giving and water-retaining trees, shrubs, ground cover and vines that will feed and protect them.
      Selection must always be done with local conditions in mind.  For example, the Palo Verde tree, a leguminous, drought-tolerant tree with edible "peas" would be great in Arizona, but not in Wales.
      Years must pass before one knows if one has chosen the right combination of plants.  The Food Forest concept is relatively new, so the number of mature (temperate) food forests on the planet is small and for any specific area, perhaps nonexistent.
      This is why it's so hard to find solid info.
      We are the people we've been waiting for.  The best thing is to connect with local Permaculture practitioners and see what they've been experimenting with.  If there aren't any in your area, "Gaia's Garden" (Hemenway) and "How to Make a Food Forest" (Whitefield) are good reading on this topic.
      I hope you'll share whatever you do find out or observe in your own efforts.

      **Peace, Denise**

       

      The Mystery of Life is not a problem to be solved

      but a reality to be experienced.   ~Frank Herbert~

       

      Denise-Christine

      The Suburban Ecovillage Project

      www.suburbanecovillage.org

      541-688-1442



    • david.keltie@gmail.com
      Excellent post, thanks. One of the problems with the internet is it s full of information passed on uncritically by people who often have no direct
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 26, 2009
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        Excellent post, thanks. One of the problems with the internet is it's
        full of 'information' passed on uncritically by people who often have
        no direct experience themselves. That's why email groups like this are
        much better than merely googling a topic.
        Cheers, david

        On 11/26/09, Denise For Peace <denise_for_peace@...> wrote:
        > The work of developing guilds is a long-term and local endeavor.
        > The principles are to select and site plants that provide human food (and
        > other products) along with the leguminous, nutrient-accumulating,
        > mulch-generating, shade-giving and water-retaining trees, shrubs, ground
        > cover and vines that will feed and protect them.
        > Selection must always be done with local conditions in mind. For example,
        > the Palo Verde tree, a leguminous, drought-tolerant tree with edible "peas"
        > would be great in Arizona, but not in Wales.
        > Years must pass before one knows if one has chosen the right combination of
        > plants. The Food Forest concept is relatively new, so the number of mature
        > (temperate) food forests on the planet is small and for any specific area,
        > perhaps nonexistent.
        > This is why it's so hard to find solid info.
        > We are the people we've been waiting for. The best thing is to connect with
        > local Permaculture practitioners and see what they've been experimenting
        > with. If there aren't any in your area, "Gaia's Garden" (Hemenway) and "How
        > to Make a Food Forest" (Whitefield) are good reading on this topic.
        > I hope you'll share whatever you do find out or observe in your own efforts.
        >
        >
        > **Peace, Denise**
        >
        > The Mystery of Life is not a problem to be solved
        > but a reality to be experienced. ~Frank Herbert~
        >
        > Denise-Christine
        > The Suburban Ecovillage Project
        > www.suburbanecovillage.org
        > 541-688-1442
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --
        Sent from my mobile device
      • ryborgryborg268
        Re: Guilds, as in Permaculture natural ecology methodology systems designed for (human) usful outputs. Yeah this is the crux, or a major one of designing
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 27, 2009
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          Re: Guilds, as in Permaculture natural ecology methodology systems designed for (human) usful outputs. Yeah this is the crux, or a major one of designing edible and useful agriculture/gardening and even woodland systems...i.e. permaculture systems. Its actually quite complicated I think really because you need a grounding in actual ecology, and then learn to translate this into permaculture systems...with all the neccessary properties: 'beneficials', nitrogen fixers, dynamic accumulators, etc etc. I.e. not just a group of food crops as such...and then the plants need to be obtained or propagated...and each located is different of course. Wow. Tryin to get my head around this art. Check out the reading list:

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/database?method=reportRows&tbl=1

          Feel free to put up relevent laterial here...vids whatever.

          We do need to suss out more guilds though.

          Blessed be

          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, david.keltie@... wrote:
          >
          > Excellent post, thanks. One of the problems with the internet is it's
          > full of 'information' passed on uncritically by people who often have
          > no direct experience themselves. That's why email groups like this are
          > much better than merely googling a topic.
          > Cheers, david
          >
          > On 11/26/09, Denise For Peace <denise_for_peace@...> wrote:
          > > The work of developing guilds is a long-term and local endeavor.
          > > The principles are to select and site plants that provide human food (and
          > > other products) along with the leguminous, nutrient-accumulating,
          > > mulch-generating, shade-giving and water-retaining trees, shrubs, ground
          > > cover and vines that will feed and protect them.
          > > Selection must always be done with local conditions in mind. For example,
          > > the Palo Verde tree, a leguminous, drought-tolerant tree with edible "peas"
          > > would be great in Arizona, but not in Wales.
          > > Years must pass before one knows if one has chosen the right combination of
          > > plants. The Food Forest concept is relatively new, so the number of mature
          > > (temperate) food forests on the planet is small and for any specific area,
          > > perhaps nonexistent.
          > > This is why it's so hard to find solid info.
          > > We are the people we've been waiting for. The best thing is to connect with
          > > local Permaculture practitioners and see what they've been experimenting
          > > with. If there aren't any in your area, "Gaia's Garden" (Hemenway) and "How
          > > to Make a Food Forest" (Whitefield) are good reading on this topic.
          > > I hope you'll share whatever you do find out or observe in your own efforts.
          > >
          > >
          > > **Peace, Denise**
          > >
          > > The Mystery of Life is not a problem to be solved
          > > but a reality to be experienced. ~Frank Herbert~
          > >
          > > Denise-Christine
          > > The Suburban Ecovillage Project
          > > www.suburbanecovillage.org
          > > 541-688-1442
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > --
          > Sent from my mobile device
          >
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