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Re: seed trading

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  • masterofthegoons
    ... Yes I am happy to trade with you. I always buy an excess of seeds online and just give them away to people. Do you grow interesting things? I live in
    Message 1 of 28 , Sep 13, 2009
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      --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "manofpeace32" <manofpeace32@...> wrote:
      >
      > I w am wondering if anyone would like to trade seeds
      > or except SASE for seeds.
      >

      Yes I am happy to trade with you. I always buy an excess of seeds online and just give them away to people. Do you grow interesting things? I live in Ireland and always try to get a cold hardy version.

      With regards to trading I will put clear nail varnish on my stamps and I will expect you to enclose them in the envelope upon reply so I can re-use them :P

      What sort of plants do you like to grow?

      I collect unusual exotics and psychedelic plants (although I wouldn't usually consume them).

      Let me know if you're interested.

      From,
      Hugh Pearse,
      Ireland
    • masterofthegoons
      ... Also have some Glaucium flavum - Yellow Horned Poppy Zornia latifolia - Maconha Brava Silene undulata - Xhosa Dream Plant Silybum marianum - Milk Thistle
      Message 2 of 28 , Sep 16, 2009
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        :) plants are my life

        Also have some
        Glaucium flavum - Yellow Horned Poppy
        Zornia latifolia - Maconha Brava
        Silene undulata - Xhosa Dream Plant
        Silybum marianum - Milk Thistle
        Turnera diffusa var. aphrodisiaca - Damiana
        Desmanthus leptolobus - Prairie mimosa
        Heimia salicifolia - Sinicuichi

        but theyre not up for trading until theyre established and producing their own seed ;)

        anyone got any Mandrake?

        From,
        Hugh Pearse,
        Ireland


        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Laury Carter" <claury@...> wrote:
        >
        > hello!
        >
        > I am quite new to this list. Is everyone from the UK?
        >
        > I too live in a cold climate..zone 3! in SW Alberta, Canada. It gets
        > below -40 C in winter. My herbs are hardy!
        >
        > I am a herb grower just setting up a cottage industry with heritage seed and
        > artwork.
        >
        > I would be happy to trade seeds as well.
        >
        > (Hugh, I have some of those too.)
        >
        > Laury
        > Canada
        >
      • BrendasOrganics@aol.com
        I m in Florida.? Anyone else tropical?? Zone 9b...are zones labeled the same in other countries? Brenda ... From: Laury Carter To:
        Message 3 of 28 , Sep 16, 2009
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          I'm in Florida.  Anyone else tropical?  Zone 9b...are zones labeled the same in other countries?
          Brenda


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Laury Carter <claury@...>
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, Sep 14, 2009 10:45 pm
          Subject: [pfaf] Re: seed trading

           
          hello!

          I am quite new to this list. Is everyone from the UK?

          I too live in a cold climate..zone 3! in SW Alberta, Canada. It gets
          below -40 C in winter. My herbs are hardy!

          I am a herb grower just setting up a cottage industry with heritage seed and
          artwork.

          I would be happy to trade seeds as well.

          (Hugh, I have some of those too.)

          Laury
          Canada

        • Gail Lloyd
          go to http://www.stepables.com/store/scripts/prodSearch.asp and click on FIND PLANTS , then view all plants, or plants by zone.  It will advise how much
          Message 4 of 28 , Sep 20, 2009
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            go to http://www.stepables.com/store/scripts/prodSearch.asp and click on "FIND PLANTS", then view all plants, or plants by zone.  It will advise how much traffic the groundcover will take, how much sun it needs, etc
            Gail

            --- On Fri, 9/18/09, Matteo Mazzola <silvanelfo@...> wrote:

            From: Matteo Mazzola <silvanelfo@...>
            Subject: [pfaf] Good ground cover
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, September 18, 2009, 6:33 AM

             
            Hi!

            I'm looking for a good variety (or varieties) or grass looking plants that can be kept (cut) at 10cm hight. 
            It should be drought resistant for just 1 or 2 months in summer time. 
            Do you have any idea?

            Thanks !

            Matteo


          • Geir Flatabø
            2009/9/22 D ... In US West Coast, and east Asia , species wealth is huge due to historic reasons, mountains going norths / south,
            Message 5 of 28 , Sep 21, 2009
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              2009/9/22 D <swampwitch@...>
              Overlooking local ecological resources contributes to their overall
              demise, and the globalisation of plants worldwide.
              This means a reduction in biodiversity.
              Instead, try to obtain useful plants from the local terrain.

              There are two reasons for doing this:

              1.  Importing species from beyond the local ecology does not benefit the
              local environment much, as plants usually relate to flora and fauna (esp
              microfauna, like pollinators) which are not likely to be present in
              local ecologies.
              In US West Coast,  and east Asia , species  wealth is huge  due to historic reasons, mountains going norths / south, making possibilities for plants to wander , south during ice age, and up nort again after ice age.
              Europe north of the Alps , and esp Scandinavia, is esp poor in species diversity,  and according to Paleontological findings, pre Ice Age flora was much more like it now is in Chine / West coast USA.


              2.  There may be a risk that an imported species will displace or at
              least compete with  local species on a number of levels.
              Bringing new species in will increase the number of species, and my observation is like new species does not compete very well in "natural established " environments, but easily behaves as pests in human disturbed areas.

              Only by planting a beech  tree - not beeing here historically, will increase species diversity  with a number of fungii and insects that will come by them selves.

              Apart from that
              of course use native plants when possible,

              Geir Flatabø
              (Norway - with probably no plants at all a 100 000 years ago)

              Think global, act local.
              What is in your local area.....are there any threatened species which
              you can utilise as a ground cover which could use a refuge or two?

              Cheers
              Deb



              masterofthegoons wrote:
              >
              >
              > when you say grass...
              >
              > A nice low hardy plant would be something from the Desmanthus Genus.
              > eg: Desmanthus virgatus
              >
              >



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            • Gaardenier
              I liked really all those stepables, but unfortunately they have nothing else than ornamental qualities, that is a pity for me. What to say about Lingonberries,
              Message 6 of 28 , Sep 21, 2009
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                I liked really all those stepables, but unfortunately they have nothing else than ornamental qualities, that is a pity for me.

                What to say about Lingonberries, existing red as well as white. Two harvests per year and children’s pleasure with special combs.

                 

                Vriendelijke groeten,

                  

                 

              • D
                When you are looking for a groundcover, it is always pertinent to look at the plants which grow naturally in your area. A very basic but often forgotten
                Message 7 of 28 , Sep 21, 2009
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                  When you are looking for a groundcover, it is always pertinent to look
                  at the plants which grow naturally in your area.

                  A very basic but often forgotten permaculture principle is to "use your
                  local resources first".
                  In the quest to beef up the list of edible plants, many practitioners
                  use plants from around the world.

                  However, when it comes to plants with more functional roles, importing
                  plants into gardens when local species would do the job as well if not
                  better is generally not wise.

                  Overlooking local ecological resources contributes to their overall
                  demise, and the globalisation of plants worldwide.
                  This means a reduction in biodiversity.
                  Instead, try to obtain useful plants from the local terrain.

                  There are two reasons for doing this:

                  1. Importing species from beyond the local ecology does not benefit the
                  local environment much, as plants usually relate to flora and fauna (esp
                  microfauna, like pollinators) which are not likely to be present in
                  local ecologies.

                  2. There may be a risk that an imported species will displace or at
                  least compete with local species on a number of levels.

                  Think global, act local.
                  What is in your local area.....are there any threatened species which
                  you can utilise as a ground cover which could use a refuge or two?

                  Cheers
                  Deb



                  masterofthegoons wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > when you say grass...
                  >
                  > A nice low hardy plant would be something from the Desmanthus Genus.
                  > eg: Desmanthus virgatus
                  >
                  >
                • Geir Flatabø
                  2009/9/22 D ... Indeed farming and foresting practice is obviously doing the same to vegetation as the ice did. ... And probably are
                  Message 8 of 28 , Sep 22, 2009
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                    2009/9/22 D <swampwitch@...>


                    Hello geir,

                    Re:
                    "Bringing new species in will increase the number of species":

                    There is not the scientific evidence available to support this.
                    Though I realise that where you are living was covered in ice, sabre-toothed tigers and woolly mammoths and neolithic 'humans' who were very resilient, ate mammoths, wore mamoth fur and built huts from mammoth bones, your assertion (above in quotes) does not apply to the Australian experience, or indeed, the experience of anywhere which was NOT covered in icicles prior to 12,000BC.

                    In fact, there is much evidence to suggest that in warmer climates, which covers most of the land in the southern hemisphere, the above statement is simply not true.
                    We are losing species of all descriptions here due to farming like Europeans, and the weeds are not doing the same job.
                    Indeed farming and foresting practice is obviously "doing the same to vegetation" as the ice did.

                    I am in the middle of compiling a database of 1,200-1,500 species of the Fabaceae (pea flower) family which are native to Australia and from my research into their conservation status, about one third are threatened.  As a rule, the Australian permaculturists have made little use of them in their domestic designs, small or large scale, even though they qualify for both Nitrogen fixing and pioneer species.  Scientists here do not think that replacing them with a handful of N fixing imports is a gain for biodiversity.
                    And probably are the imports not able to compete with indigenous species either except in disturbed areas.

                    I realise that there is more biodiversity in the Sydney basin than there is in most of northern Europe due to the fact that the area, having thawed out after the ice age, was recolonised by plants from the south to the north over a period of time.  But for the most part almost the entire continent of Australia has had its flora for a very long time.  Eg, Eucalypts, though evolved to benefit from being highly flammable, have been here for about 50 million years, and there is evidence that they have been burning for about 8 million years.  The understorey species which support them (ast paragraph) deserve a bit of respect, being highly adapted to different soils, climatic regimes, vegetation communities and also our fauna (including microfauna).  It is a difficult act for a any weed to follow.

                    I hope your area does not revert to the ice age due to climate change any time soon.
                    Thanks for your input based on the Norwegian experience.
                    In fact the opposite is happening as climate gets warmer,
                    so a few hardy eucalypts is also able to survive,
                    but not yet able to get invasive...

                    Geir 

                    Cheers,

                    Deb
                    Adelaide
                    South Australia
                    Deb


                    Geir Flatabø wrote:
                     



                    2009/9/22 D <swampwitch@adam. com.au>
                    Overlooking local ecological resources contributes to their overall
                    demise, and the globalisation of plants worldwide.
                    This means a reduction in biodiversity.
                    Instead, try to obtain useful plants from the local terrain.

                    There are two reasons for doing this:

                    1.  Importing species from beyond the local ecology does not benefit the
                    local environment much, as plants usually relate to flora and fauna (esp
                    microfauna, like pollinators) which are not likely to be present in
                    local ecologies.
                    In US West Coast,  and east Asia , species  wealth is huge  due to historic reasons, mountains going norths / south, making possibilities for plants to wander , south during ice age, and up nort again after ice age.
                    Europe north of the Alps , and esp Scandinavia, is esp poor in species diversity,  and according to Paleontological findings, pre Ice Age flora was much more like it now is in Chine / West coast USA.


                    2.  There may be a risk that an imported species will displace or at
                    least compete with  local species on a number of levels.
                    Bringing new species in will increase the number of species, and my observation is like new species does not compete very well in "natural established " environments, but easily behaves as pests in human disturbed areas.

                    Only by planting a beech  tree - not beeing here historically, will increase species diversity  with a number of fungii and insects that will come by them selves.

                    Apart from that
                    of course use native plants when possible,

                    Geir Flatabø
                    (Norway - with probably no plants at all a 100 000 years ago)

                    Think global, act local.
                    What is in your local area.....are there any threatened species which
                    you can utilise as a ground cover which could use a refuge or two?

                    Cheers
                    Deb



                    masterofthegoons wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > when you say grass...
                    >
                    > A nice low hardy plant would be something from the Desmanthus Genus.
                    > eg: Desmanthus virgatus
                    >
                    >



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                  • D
                    Hello geir, Re: /Bringing new species in will increase the number of species/ : There is not the scientific evidence available to support this. Though I
                    Message 9 of 28 , Sep 22, 2009
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                      Hello geir,

                      Re:
                      "Bringing new species in will increase the number of species":

                      There is not the scientific evidence available to support this.
                      Though I realise that where you are living was covered in ice, sabre-toothed tigers and woolly mammoths and neolithic 'humans' who were very resilient, ate mammoths, wore mamoth fur and built huts from mammoth bones, your assertion (above in quotes) does not apply to the Australian experience, or indeed, the experience of anywhere which was NOT covered in icicles prior to 12,000BC.

                      In fact, there is much evidence to suggest that in warmer climates, which covers most of the land in the southern hemisphere, the above statement is simply not true.
                      We are losing species of all descriptions here due to farming like Europeans, and the weeds are not doing the same job.

                      I am in the middle of compiling a database of 1,200-1,500 species of the Fabaceae (pea flower) family which are native to Australia and from my research into their conservation status, about one third are threatened.  As a rule, the Australian permaculturists have made little use of them in their domestic designs, small or large scale, even though they qualify for both Nitrogen fixing and pioneer species.  Scientists here do not think that replacing them with a handful of N fixing imports is a gain for biodiversity.

                      I realise that there is more biodiversity in the Sydney basin than there is in most of northern Europe due to the fact that the area, having thawed out after the ice age, was recolonised by plants from the south to the north over a period of time.  But for the most part almost the entire continent of Australia has had its flora for a very long time.  Eg, Eucalypts, though evolved to benefit from being highly flammable, have been here for about 50 million years, and there is evidence that they have been burning for about 8 million years.  The understorey species which support them (ast paragraph) deserve a bit of respect, being highly adapted to different soils, climatic regimes, vegetation communities and also our fauna (including microfauna).  It is a difficult act for a any weed to follow.

                      I hope your area does not revert to the ice age due to climate change any time soon.
                      Thanks for your input based on the Norwegian experience.

                      Cheers,

                      Deb
                      Adelaide
                      South Australia
                      Deb

                      Geir Flatabø wrote:
                       



                      2009/9/22 D <swampwitch@adam. com.au>
                      Overlooking local ecological resources contributes to their overall
                      demise, and the globalisation of plants worldwide.
                      This means a reduction in biodiversity.
                      Instead, try to obtain useful plants from the local terrain.

                      There are two reasons for doing this:

                      1.  Importing species from beyond the local ecology does not benefit the
                      local environment much, as plants usually relate to flora and fauna (esp
                      microfauna, like pollinators) which are not likely to be present in
                      local ecologies.
                      In US West Coast,  and east Asia , species  wealth is huge  due to historic reasons, mountains going norths / south, making possibilities for plants to wander , south during ice age, and up nort again after ice age.
                      Europe north of the Alps , and esp Scandinavia, is esp poor in species diversity,  and according to Paleontological findings, pre Ice Age flora was much more like it now is in Chine / West coast USA.


                      2.  There may be a risk that an imported species will displace or at
                      least compete with  local species on a number of levels.
                      Bringing new species in will increase the number of species, and my observation is like new species does not compete very well in "natural established " environments, but easily behaves as pests in human disturbed areas.

                      Only by planting a beech  tree - not beeing here historically, will increase species diversity  with a number of fungii and insects that will come by them selves.

                      Apart from that
                      of course use native plants when possible,

                      Geir Flatabø
                      (Norway - with probably no plants at all a 100 000 years ago)

                      Think global, act local.
                      What is in your local area.....are there any threatened species which
                      you can utilise as a ground cover which could use a refuge or two?

                      Cheers
                      Deb



                      masterofthegoons wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > when you say grass...
                      >
                      > A nice low hardy plant would be something from the Desmanthus Genus.
                      > eg: Desmanthus virgatus
                      >
                      >



                      ------------ --------- --------- ------

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                    • Gaardenier
                      Dearest friends, Why making things complicated? Do we want groundcover or undercover. Dewberries and/or Cloudberries would also do the job! As a good
                      Message 10 of 28 , Sep 23, 2009
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                        Dearest friends,

                         

                        Why making things complicated? Do we want groundcover or undercover. Dewberries and/or Cloudberries would also do the job!

                        As a good groundcover must be a bit invasive, otherways it will be covered by plants you don’t want, that is the right effect you need!

                         

                        Vriendelijke groeten,

                          

                         

                      • Peter Ellis
                        The message ... I don t think so. I m in Istria, Croatia and I don t know what the equivalent US zone
                        Message 11 of 28 , Sep 28, 2009
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                          The message <8CC05038B09EB18-620C-4F99@...>
                          from BrendasOrganics@... contains these words:

                          > I'm in Florida.? Anyone else tropical?? Zone 9b...are zones labeled
                          > the same in other countries?

                          > Brenda

                          I don't think so. I'm in Istria, Croatia and I don't know what the
                          equivalent US zone would be. I would guess at something equating to
                          northern California.

                          Cheers

                          --
                          --
                          Peter Ellis

                          Porec Sales Office - over the road from Lidl
                          Croatia Property Services
                          A trading name of Peter Ellis Grupa d.o.o.
                          Selling in the new Tuscany!

                          Tel +385 (0) 981 82 62 40 Personal
                          +385 (0) 98 26 16 24 Eng
                          +385 (0) 99 69 38 856 Eng/Hr/It/De
                          +385 (0) 99 69 38 859 Eng/Hr
                          +385 (0) 52 44 94 34 Eng/Hr/It/De


                          peter.ellis@...


                          http://www.croatiapropertyservices.com
                          http://croatiaproperty.proboards16.com
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