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Re: [pfaf] edible house plants?

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  • Shaman Odin
    Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a tomato plant in a
    Message 1 of 26 , Aug 25, 2009
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      Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
      it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
      tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
      trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin

      On 25/08/2009, hydrochar <bgmartin@...> wrote:
      > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible plants
      > that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you had good
      > luck with indoors?
      >
      >


      --
      Blessings of the Netjer
      Shaman Odin
    • hydrochar
      Deb, I have heard that some strawberries such as the day neutrals and alpine strawberries do well inside. I think that I ll pot some of mine up and bring them
      Message 2 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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        Deb, I have heard that some strawberries such as the day neutrals and alpine strawberries do well inside. I think that I'll pot some of mine up and bring them in for the winter to see how it goes. I'm thinking of putting the day neutrals in a hanging pot to let runners cascade over the edge. I'll put both plants in sunny windows and we'll see how that goes.
        Thanks,
        Greg

        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, D <swampwitch@...> wrote:
        >
        > I can only offer suggestions by default, in that some plants seem to
        > thrive on a somewhat lower light requirement, though they may be heavy
        > feeders with regard to water and fertiliser.
        > Parsley and celery seem the most undemanding under lower light
        > conditions, whereas eg. brassicaceae don't seem to cut it and just grow
        > leggy.
        > Strawberries may be worth a try too, as they come from a forest
        > environment originally.
      • hydrochar
        Thanks for the ideas, I m planning to try banana, but for some reason I hadn t considered tomatoes. After thinking about it I bet they d do great in a hanging
        Message 3 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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          Thanks for the ideas, I'm planning to try banana, but for some reason I hadn't considered tomatoes. After thinking about it I bet they'd do great in a hanging basket. I'm picturing a nice cherry tomato that I'd prune to try and keep just the right size while setting new flowers. I'll have to do some web searches to see what varieties have been used this way. If you try corn you'll have to post some pics!
          Oh, and thank you for the blessings,
          Greg

          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Shaman Odin <shamanodin1951@...> wrote:
          >
          > Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
          > it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
          > tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
          > trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin
        • Gail Lloyd
          dwarf citrus, if you have a sunny south window Gail ... From: D Subject: [pfaf] Re: edible house plants? To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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            dwarf citrus, if you have a sunny south window
            Gail

            --- On Wed, 8/26/09, D <swampwitch@...> wrote:

            From: D <swampwitch@...>
            Subject: [pfaf] Re: edible house plants?
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 9:31 AM

             
            I can only offer suggestions by default, in that some plants seem to
            thrive on a somewhat lower light requirement, though they may be heavy
            feeders with regard to water and fertiliser.
            Parsley and celery seem the most undemanding under lower light
            conditions, whereas eg. brassicaceae don't seem to cut it and just grow
            leggy.
            Strawberries may be worth a try too, as they come from a forest
            environment originally.

            Cheers
            Deb

            hydrochar wrote:
            >
            >
            > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible
            > plants that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you
            > had good luck with indoors?
            >
            >


          • Gail Lloyd
            also sprouts.  see http://www.classbrain.com/artfamily/publish/growing_sprouts.shtml Gail ... From: D Subject: [pfaf] Re: edible
            Message 5 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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              Gail

              --- On Wed, 8/26/09, D <swampwitch@...> wrote:

              From: D <swampwitch@...>
              Subject: [pfaf] Re: edible house plants?
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 9:31 AM

               
              I can only offer suggestions by default, in that some plants seem to
              thrive on a somewhat lower light requirement, though they may be heavy
              feeders with regard to water and fertiliser.
              Parsley and celery seem the most undemanding under lower light
              conditions, whereas eg. brassicaceae don't seem to cut it and just grow
              leggy.
              Strawberries may be worth a try too, as they come from a forest
              environment originally.

              Cheers
              Deb

              hydrochar wrote:
              >
              >
              > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible
              > plants that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you
              > had good luck with indoors?
              >
              >


            • Griselda Mussett
              How much space do you have? Sprouting beans is an old favourite... they re edible in just a few days and don t need much light, and you can grow them on a
              Message 6 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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                How much space do you have?   

                Sprouting beans is an old favourite... they're edible in just a few days and don't need much light, and you can grow them on a windowsill. They're supposed to be more nutritious than just eating the beans...

                You can grow mushrooms of different kinds in a cellar or under the stairs.

                I believe you can grow climbing beans (such as runner beans) right round the windows and if you do have light (and insects to pollinate?) you can have very ornamental edibles that way.

                Oranges and lemons will grow on quite small trees in pots.

                Loads of herbs will grow indoors - mint, basil, etc.

                I've seen watercress growing in a tub of clear water outside someone's back door.

                Grapes - planted outside and trained inside through a small hole...they used to do this in big greenhouses but you could do that in a conservatory or along a big window.

                Good luck

                griselda







                Griselda
                On 26 Aug 2009, at 04:32, Shaman Odin wrote:

                 

                Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
                it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
                tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
                trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin

                On 25/08/2009, hydrochar <bgmartin@myfairpoin t.net> wrote:
                > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible plants
                > that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you had good
                > luck with indoors?
                >
                >

                --
                Blessings of the Netjer
                Shaman Odin



                The news isn't that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it's that they are so good for you they could save your life.
                                       By David Bjerklie, TIME Magazine, October 20, 2003
                Juice PLUS+ Capsules contain 17 fruits, vegetables, oats and grains. The ingredients are applescranberriesdatesorangespapayapeachespineapplesbeetsbroccolicarrotscabbagekaletomatoesparsleygarlicspinachrice bran (no gluten), and oats (no gluten). 
                and ~ NEW Juice PLUS+ Vineyard Blend adds BlueberriesCranberries, Concorde Grape, BlackberriesBilberries, Grape Seed, Raspberry, Elderberries, Red Currants, and Black Currants.  
                Check it out www.takejuiceplus.co.uk

                 

                 


              • Griselda Mussett
                I just googled edible house plants and there are lots of links on there too griselda ... The news isn t that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it s
                Message 7 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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                  I just googled 'edible house plants' and there are lots of links on there too
                  griselda



                  On 26 Aug 2009, at 04:32, Shaman Odin wrote:

                   

                  Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
                  it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
                  tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
                  trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin

                  On 25/08/2009, hydrochar <bgmartin@myfairpoin t.net> wrote:
                  > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible plants
                  > that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you had good
                  > luck with indoors?
                  >
                  >

                  --
                  Blessings of the Netjer
                  Shaman Odin



                  The news isn't that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it's that they are so good for you they could save your life.
                                         By David Bjerklie, TIME Magazine, October 20, 2003
                  Juice PLUS+ Capsules contain 17 fruits, vegetables, oats and grains. The ingredients are applescranberriesdatesorangespapayapeachespineapplesbeetsbroccolicarrotscabbagekaletomatoesparsleygarlicspinachrice bran (no gluten), and oats (no gluten). 
                  and ~ NEW Juice PLUS+ Vineyard Blend adds BlueberriesCranberries, Concorde Grape, BlackberriesBilberries, Grape Seed, Raspberry, Elderberries, Red Currants, and Black Currants.  
                  Check it out www.takejuiceplus.co.uk

                   

                   


                • w50srj@btinternet.com
                  add in traditional mustard and cress, and you can sprout onion seeds in the same way to eat as seedlings. Grow them in vermiculite or similar, nor soil for a
                  Message 8 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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                    add in traditional mustard and cress, and you can sprout onion seeds in the same way to eat as seedlings. Grow them in vermiculite or similar, nor soil for a cleaner crop. You don't need pollinating insects if you have a small apintbrush, its a bit fiddly you just brush the pollen off one flower and brush it on to the stigma of a flower that is ready to be pollinated. tapping the stems of the plants to make a pollen cloud is less fuss but the result is less guaranteed.
                    Sheila
                    --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > How much space do you have?
                    >
                    > Sprouting beans is an old favourite... they're edible in just a few
                    > days and don't need much light, and you can grow them on a
                    > windowsill. They're supposed to be more nutritious than just eating
                    > the beans...
                    >
                    > You can grow mushrooms of different kinds in a cellar or under the
                    > stairs.
                    >
                    > I believe you can grow climbing beans (such as runner beans) right
                    > round the windows and if you do have light (and insects to
                    > pollinate?) you can have very ornamental edibles that way.
                    >
                    > Oranges and lemons will grow on quite small trees in pots.
                    >
                    > Loads of herbs will grow indoors - mint, basil, etc.
                    >
                    > I've seen watercress growing in a tub of clear water outside
                    > someone's back door.
                    >
                    > Grapes - planted outside and trained inside through a small
                    > hole...they used to do this in big greenhouses but you could do that
                    > in a conservatory or along a big window.
                    >
                    > Good luck
                    >
                    > griselda
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Griselda
                    >
                  • Gail Lloyd
                    you can also hand pollinate yourself w/ a Q-tip ... From: Griselda Mussett Subject: Re: [pfaf] edible house plants? To:
                    Message 9 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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                      you can also hand pollinate yourself w/ a Q-tip

                      --- On Wed, 8/26/09, Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...> wrote:

                      From: Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...>
                      Subject: Re: [pfaf] edible house plants?
                      To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 7:57 AM

                       
                      How much space do you have?   

                      Sprouting beans is an old favourite... they're edible in just a few days and don't need much light, and you can grow them on a windowsill. They're supposed to be more nutritious than just eating the beans...

                      You can grow mushrooms of different kinds in a cellar or under the stairs.

                      I believe you can grow climbing beans (such as runner beans) right round the windows and if you do have light (and insects to pollinate?) you can have very ornamental edibles that way.

                      Oranges and lemons will grow on quite small trees in pots.

                      Loads of herbs will grow indoors - mint, basil, etc.

                      I've seen watercress growing in a tub of clear water outside someone's back door.

                      Grapes - planted outside and trained inside through a small hole...they used to do this in big greenhouses but you could do that in a conservatory or along a big window.

                      Good luck

                      griselda







                      Griselda
                      On 26 Aug 2009, at 04:32, Shaman Odin wrote:

                       
                      Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
                      it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
                      tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
                      trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin

                      On 25/08/2009, hydrochar <bgmartin@myfairpoin t.net> wrote:
                      > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible plants
                      > that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you had good
                      > luck with indoors?
                      >
                      >

                      --
                      Blessings of the Netjer
                      Shaman Odin


                      The news isn't that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it's that they are so good for you they could save your life.
                                             By David Bjerklie, TIME Magazine, October 20, 2003
                      Juice PLUS+ Capsules contain 17 fruits, vegetables, oats and grains. The ingredients are applescranberriesdatesorangespapayapeachespineapplesbeetsbroccolicarrotscabbagekaletomatoesparsleygarlicspinachrice bran (no gluten), and oats (no gluten). 
                      and ~ NEW Juice PLUS+ Vineyard Blend adds BlueberriesCranberries, Concorde Grape, BlackberriesBilberries, Grape Seed, Raspberry, Elderberries, Red Currants, and Black Currants.  
                      Check it out www.takejuiceplus. co.uk

                       

                       



                    • D
                      I can only offer suggestions by default, in that some plants seem to thrive on a somewhat lower light requirement, though they may be heavy feeders with regard
                      Message 10 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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                        I can only offer suggestions by default, in that some plants seem to
                        thrive on a somewhat lower light requirement, though they may be heavy
                        feeders with regard to water and fertiliser.
                        Parsley and celery seem the most undemanding under lower light
                        conditions, whereas eg. brassicaceae don't seem to cut it and just grow
                        leggy.
                        Strawberries may be worth a try too, as they come from a forest
                        environment originally.

                        Cheers
                        Deb

                        hydrochar wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible
                        > plants that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you
                        > had good luck with indoors?
                        >
                        >
                      • Joseph A. Cleary
                        Dear Gail: Instead of doing it by hand you could use sugar water and spray it on and allow the fly s to do it for you, but then you ll also attract bee s too.
                        Message 11 of 26 , Aug 26, 2009
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                                  Dear Gail:
                                      Instead of doing it by hand you could use sugar water and spray it on and allow the fly's to do it for you, but then you'll also attract bee's too. They love sugar as much as people do.
                                      Some people use sugar water to feed their bee's over the winter but that was before science got involved in the US and now the bee's are hard to find. Some of the people here in Oklahoma use the sugar water to attract the fly's as they'll do the job too.
                                      Like the saying goes good luck and do have a good Shabbis.
                          Shalom, Shalom, Yosef of Ok.
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2009 10:27 AM
                          Subject: [Norton AntiSpam] Re: [pfaf] edible house plants?

                           

                          you can also hand pollinate yourself w/ a Q-tip

                          --- On Wed, 8/26/09, Griselda Mussett <griselda1@btinterne t.com> wrote:

                          From: Griselda Mussett <griselda1@btinterne t.com>
                          Subject: Re: [pfaf] edible house plants?
                          To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
                          Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2009, 7:57 AM

                           
                          How much space do you have?   

                          Sprouting beans is an old favourite... they're edible in just a few days and don't need much light, and you can grow them on a windowsill. They're supposed to be more nutritious than just eating the beans...

                          You can grow mushrooms of different kinds in a cellar or under the stairs.

                          I believe you can grow climbing beans (such as runner beans) right round the windows and if you do have light (and insects to pollinate?) you can have very ornamental edibles that way.

                          Oranges and lemons will grow on quite small trees in pots.

                          Loads of herbs will grow indoors - mint, basil, etc.

                          I've seen watercress growing in a tub of clear water outside someone's back door.

                          Grapes - planted outside and trained inside through a small hole...they used to do this in big greenhouses but you could do that in a conservatory or along a big window.

                          Good luck

                          griselda







                          Griselda
                          On 26 Aug 2009, at 04:32, Shaman Odin wrote:

                           
                          Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
                          it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
                          tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
                          trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin

                          On 25/08/2009, hydrochar <bgmartin@myfairpoin t.net> wrote:
                          > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible plants
                          > that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you had good
                          > luck with indoors?
                          >
                          >

                          --
                          Blessings of the Netjer
                          Shaman Odin


                          The news isn't that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it's that they are so good for you they could save your life.
                                                 By David Bjerklie, TIME Magazine, October 20, 2003
                          Juice PLUS+ Capsules contain 17 fruits, vegetables, oats and grains. The ingredients are applescranberriesdatesorangespapayapeachespineapplesbeetsbroccolicarrotscabbagekaletomatoesparsleygarlicspinachrice bran (no gluten), and oats (no gluten). 
                          and ~ NEW Juice PLUS+ Vineyard Blend adds BlueberriesCranberries, Concorde Grape, BlackberriesBilberries, Grape Seed, Raspberry, Elderberries, Red Currants, and Black Currants.  
                          Check it out www.takejuiceplus. co.uk

                           

                           



                        • Shaman Odin
                          Yes, a large hanging pot would work well for tomatoes, just watch out for the roots getting chocked! Thats what we all are here for:-). All i can do is try to
                          Message 12 of 26 , Aug 27, 2009
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                            Yes, a large hanging pot would work well for tomatoes, just watch out
                            for the roots getting chocked! Thats what we all are here for:-).
                            All i can do is try to experiment with corn. By the way, 10.0 uvb
                            reptile flourescent lights, plants love, i found that out accidently
                            many years ago, i also love reptiles:-). Take care, ok? Blessings of
                            the Netjer Shaman Odin

                            On 26/08/2009, hydrochar <bgmartin@...> wrote:
                            > Thanks for the ideas, I'm planning to try banana, but for some reason I
                            > hadn't considered tomatoes. After thinking about it I bet they'd do great
                            > in a hanging basket. I'm picturing a nice cherry tomato that I'd prune to
                            > try and keep just the right size while setting new flowers. I'll have to do
                            > some web searches to see what varieties have been used this way. If you try
                            > corn you'll have to post some pics!
                            > Oh, and thank you for the blessings,
                            > Greg
                            >
                            > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Shaman Odin <shamanodin1951@...> wrote:
                            >>
                            >> Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
                            >> it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
                            >> tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
                            >> trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin
                            >
                            >
                            >


                            --
                            Blessings of the Netjer
                            Shaman Odin
                          • jenniferpittet
                            I ve also had good results with growing parsley indoors over the winter. And New Zealand spinach was another winner. I brought a couple of plants in and cut
                            Message 13 of 26 , Aug 27, 2009
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                              I've also had good results with growing parsley indoors over the winter. And New Zealand spinach was another winner. I brought a couple of plants in and cut off a few leaves at a time to throw in soups and stews all winter. Gives a great burst of greens for the winter months.

                              Jennifer
                              Meaford, Canada

                              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "hydrochar" <bgmartin@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible plants that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you had good luck with indoors?
                              >
                            • denise_for_peace
                              Yes, with a south-facing windows, tomatoes should do well. I read recently that they are self-pollinating, but I don t know what we can do to encourage that
                              Message 14 of 26 , Aug 27, 2009
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                                Yes, with a south-facing windows, tomatoes should do well. I read recently that they are self-pollinating, but I don't know what we can do to encourage that process--I grew some inside and they didn't produce much. Anyone? Will post again if I get answers from elsewhere.

                                Just wanted to chime in to encourage cherry tomatoes. Also, I read in Organic Gardening mag years ago that some of these decorative, miniature peppers are edible (and beautiful! I think one was called "Christmas Lights"). The article was specifically about growing these peppers in areas with a short growing season. The miniature fruits take less time/sun/everything to ripen, apparently. I think they also mentioned that these varieties were ideal for indoor/sunroom gardening. I wish I had time to dig out that old mag, scan and share it, but I don't. Please, anyone who has other info or suggestions for small tomato/pepper cultivars: Chime In!
                              • D
                                Curly parsley better than Italian for low light/indoors, being of a naturally more diminutive form anyway. Italian flat leaved parsley just gets leggy in lower
                                Message 15 of 26 , Aug 27, 2009
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                                  Curly parsley better than Italian for low light/indoors, being of a
                                  naturally more diminutive form anyway.
                                  Italian flat leaved parsley just gets leggy in lower light.

                                  I am wondering about lettuces as well, esp open leaf forms....doesn't
                                  seem to like too much hot sun anyway.

                                  Capsicums may do well in sunny windows too if it is warm enough, mine
                                  have just survived winter (lowest min here was about C3 deg) without
                                  losing their leaves, and they are outdoors.


                                  Cheers
                                  deb
                                  hydrochar wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Thanks for the ideas, I'm planning to try banana, but for some reason
                                  > I hadn't considered tomatoes. After thinking about it I bet they'd do
                                  > great in a hanging basket. I'm picturing a nice cherry tomato that I'd
                                  > prune to try and keep just the right size while setting new flowers.
                                  > I'll have to do some web searches to see what varieties have been used
                                  > this way. If you try corn you'll have to post some pics!
                                  > Oh, and thank you for the blessings,
                                  > Greg
                                  >
                                  > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com <mailto:pfaf%40yahoogroups.com>, Shaman
                                  > Odin <shamanodin1951@ ...> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
                                  > > it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
                                  > > tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
                                  > > trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin
                                  >
                                  >
                                • D
                                  Forgot to mention that another dwarf banana variety has been developed. Though apparently pot-grown bananas is a way to limit their growth anyway, which tends
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Aug 27, 2009
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                                    Forgot to mention that another dwarf banana variety has been developed.
                                    Though apparently pot-grown bananas is a way to limit their growth
                                    anyway, which tends to be rampant.

                                    Banana cultivars: Dwarf Cavendish and Williams

                                    see also eg: http://www.greenhousebusiness.com/bananaplants.html


                                    /Banana/ Trees /Banana/ Plants
                                    <http://www.greenhousebusiness.com/bananaplants.html>

                                    Super /Dwarf/ Cavendish /banana/ plant /variety/ that only gets 3' high.
                                    Produces excellent dessert type fruit. Great for indoors. a beautiful
                                    potted plant too. *...*
                                    www.greenhousebusiness.com/*banana*plants.html - 14 hours ago - Cached
                                    <http://74.125.153.132/search?q=cache:odbzmoGveJgJ:www.greenhousebusiness.com/bananaplants.html+Dwarf+banana+varieties+csiro&cd=3&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=au>
                                    - Similar
                                    <http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&q=related:www.greenhousebusiness.com/bananaplants.html>

                                    and;
                                    http://bananas.bioversityinternational.org/files/files/pdf/publications/info08.2_en.pdf
                                    which contained
                                    this article which was very interesting: *"Musa clones in Peru:
                                    classification, uses, production potential and constraints"*

                                    "....yes, we have some bananas..."

                                    Thanks for sharing that idea, think I'll get one too.

                                    Cheers
                                    Deb

                                    hydrochar wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Thanks for the ideas, I'm planning to try banana, but for some reason
                                    > I hadn't considered tomatoes. After thinking about it I bet they'd do
                                    > great in a hanging basket. I'm picturing a nice cherry tomato that I'd
                                    > prune to try and keep just the right size while setting new flowers.
                                    > I'll have to do some web searches to see what varieties have been used
                                    > this way. If you try corn you'll have to post some pics!
                                    > Oh, and thank you for the blessings,
                                    > Greg
                                    >
                                    > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com <mailto:pfaf%40yahoogroups.com>, Shaman
                                    > Odin <shamanodin1951@ ...> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Banana trees, just keep the top croped. Use a half barrel pot when
                                    > > it gets bigger. I havent tried corn yet, but i managed to grow a
                                    > > tomato plant in a similar way, watch out for the roots getting choked,
                                    > > trim them when needed. Blessings of the Netjer Shaman Odin
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Shaman Odin
                                    I first tried a hanging 12 inch pot, the tomatoe roots went wild, a fine mesh hanging pot worked better, but keep something under it or you will regret it
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Aug 28, 2009
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                                      I first tried a hanging 12 inch pot, the tomatoe roots went wild, a
                                      fine mesh hanging pot worked better, but keep something under it or
                                      you will regret it every time you water it! Try a oscilating fan set
                                      at low, that will help during the blooming cycle:-). After the first
                                      sucess it will be easier:-). Sometimes the bonzai technique works on
                                      tree`s, but not always! Use your instincts. Please do not forget the
                                      lighting, putting them on a timer helps. Blessings of the Netjer
                                      Shaman Odin

                                      On 27/08/2009, denise_for_peace <denise_for_peace@...> wrote:
                                      > Yes, with a south-facing windows, tomatoes should do well. I read recently
                                      > that they are self-pollinating, but I don't know what we can do to encourage
                                      > that process--I grew some inside and they didn't produce much. Anyone?
                                      > Will post again if I get answers from elsewhere.
                                      >
                                      > Just wanted to chime in to encourage cherry tomatoes. Also, I read in
                                      > Organic Gardening mag years ago that some of these decorative, miniature
                                      > peppers are edible (and beautiful! I think one was called "Christmas
                                      > Lights"). The article was specifically about growing these peppers in areas
                                      > with a short growing season. The miniature fruits take less
                                      > time/sun/everything to ripen, apparently. I think they also mentioned that
                                      > these varieties were ideal for indoor/sunroom gardening. I wish I had time
                                      > to dig out that old mag, scan and share it, but I don't. Please, anyone who
                                      > has other info or suggestions for small tomato/pepper cultivars: Chime In!
                                      >
                                      >


                                      --
                                      Blessings of the Netjer
                                      Shaman Odin
                                    • Shaman Odin
                                      Your only limiter is your imagination and the size of the plant:-). If one swag hook starts to stress, try using three of them and dividing the weight
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Aug 28, 2009
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                                        Your only limiter is your imagination and the size of the plant:-).
                                        If one swag hook starts to stress, try using three of them and
                                        dividing the weight equally:-). If it gets big enough you will know
                                        why:-). I love plants:-). I also have 6 gardens, the main one is a
                                        circle garden, it has a plum tree in the center:-). Blessings of the
                                        Netjer Shaman Odin

                                        On 27/08/2009, jenniferpittet <jenniferpittet@...> wrote:
                                        > I've also had good results with growing parsley indoors over the winter. And
                                        > New Zealand spinach was another winner. I brought a couple of plants in and
                                        > cut off a few leaves at a time to throw in soups and stews all winter. Gives
                                        > a great burst of greens for the winter months.
                                        >
                                        > Jennifer
                                        > Meaford, Canada
                                        >
                                        > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "hydrochar" <bgmartin@...> wrote:
                                        >>
                                        >> As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible
                                        >> plants that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you had
                                        >> good luck with indoors?
                                        >>
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >


                                        --
                                        Blessings of the Netjer
                                        Shaman Odin
                                      • Gail Lloyd
                                        Self-pollinating just means that the plant has both male & female parts (stamen & carpel) on the same plant.  It still need to be pollinated by an outside
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Aug 28, 2009
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                                          Self-pollinating just means that the plant has both male & female parts (stamen & carpel) on the same plant.  It still need to be pollinated by an outside source, such as insects or hand pollination.
                                          I once saw a pepper plant in a greenhouse that was shaped into a bonsai (keep pruned & take out plant & prune roots each year, then replant).  It had lived many years in the greenhouse & was so beautiful.  You might be able to do the same thing by a south-facing window. 
                                          I'd also like to suggest a self-watering system for potted plants... it takes the guesswork out of how much to water the plants, and also is a lot easier, especially if you go on vacation.  http://familyfinances.suite101.com/article.cfm/self_watering_systems_for_plants
                                          Gail

                                          --- On Thu, 8/27/09, denise_for_peace <denise_for_peace@...> wrote:

                                          From: denise_for_peace <denise_for_peace@...>
                                          Subject: [pfaf] Re: Tomatoes/edible house plants?
                                          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Thursday, August 27, 2009, 12:04 PM

                                           
                                          Yes, with a south-facing windows, tomatoes should do well. I read recently that they are self-pollinating, but I don't know what we can do to encourage that process--I grew some inside and they didn't produce much. Anyone? Will post again if I get answers from elsewhere.

                                          Just wanted to chime in to encourage cherry tomatoes. Also, I read in Organic Gardening mag years ago that some of these decorative, miniature peppers are edible (and beautiful! I think one was called "Christmas Lights"). The article was specifically about growing these peppers in areas with a short growing season. The miniature fruits take less time/sun/everything to ripen, apparently. I think they also mentioned that these varieties were ideal for indoor/sunroom gardening. I wish I had time to dig out that old mag, scan and share it, but I don't. Please, anyone who has other info or suggestions for small tomato/pepper cultivars: Chime In!


                                        • hydrochar
                                          Jennifer, New Zealand spinach is one plant I was planning to trial, I m so happy to hear you had good luck with it. Some NZS plants are supposed to be
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Aug 29, 2009
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                                            Jennifer, New Zealand spinach is one plant I was planning to trial, I'm so happy to hear you had good luck with it. Some NZS plants are supposed to be perennials while other plants will be annuals. Did you keep yours for more than the winter? I'm wondering if it can do well for years in the house, or if it's better for just overwintering.
                                            Thanks,
                                            Greg
                                            Maine, USA

                                            --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "jenniferpittet" <jenniferpittet@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > I've also had good results with growing parsley indoors over the winter. And New Zealand spinach was another winner. I brought a couple of plants in and cut off a few leaves at a time to throw in soups and stews all winter. Gives a great burst of greens for the winter months.
                                            >
                                            > Jennifer
                                            > Meaford, Canada
                                          • Griselda Mussett
                                            What is New Zealand spinach? griselda ... The news isn t that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it s that they are so good for you they could save your
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Aug 30, 2009
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                                              What is New Zealand spinach?
                                              griselda


                                              On 27 Aug 2009, at 19:41, jenniferpittet wrote:

                                               

                                              I've also had good results with growing parsley indoors over the winter. And New Zealand spinach was another winner. I brought a couple of plants in and cut off a few leaves at a time to throw in soups and stews all winter. Gives a great burst of greens for the winter months.

                                              Jennifer
                                              Meaford, Canada

                                              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com, "hydrochar" <bgmartin@.. .> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of edible plants that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants have you had good luck with indoors?
                                              >



                                              The news isn't that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it's that they are so good for you they could save your life.
                                                                     By David Bjerklie, TIME Magazine, October 20, 2003
                                              Juice PLUS+ Capsules contain 17 fruits, vegetables, oats and grains. The ingredients are applescranberriesdatesorangespapayapeachespineapplesbeetsbroccolicarrotscabbagekaletomatoesparsleygarlicspinachrice bran (no gluten), and oats (no gluten). 
                                              and ~ NEW Juice PLUS+ Vineyard Blend adds BlueberriesCranberries, Concorde Grape, BlackberriesBilberries, Grape Seed, Raspberry, Elderberries, Red Currants, and Black Currants.  
                                              Check it out www.takejuiceplus.co.uk

                                               

                                               


                                            • Jennifer Pittet
                                              Hi Greg, I didn t know that they could be annuals or perennials. I kept them inside for one winter only, then re-planted them outside. Where can I find out
                                              Message 22 of 26 , Aug 30, 2009
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                                                Hi Greg,
                                                I didn't know that they could be annuals or perennials. I kept them inside for one winter only, then re-planted them outside. Where can I find out more about the annual vs perennial bit.
                                                I'm also planning to bring my sorrel in for the winter, because I'm moving and don't have another garden to put it in yet. I assume it should be fine. It's a perennial here.
                                                Jennifer

                                                On Sat, Aug 29, 2009 at 7:59 PM, hydrochar <bgmartin@...> wrote:
                                                 

                                                Jennifer, New Zealand spinach is one plant I was planning to trial, I'm so happy to hear you had good luck with it. Some NZS plants are supposed to be perennials while other plants will be annuals. Did you keep yours for more than the winter? I'm wondering if it can do well for years in the house, or if it's better for just overwintering.
                                                Thanks,
                                                Greg
                                                Maine, USA



                                                --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "jenniferpittet" <jenniferpittet@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > I've also had good results with growing parsley indoors over the winter. And New Zealand spinach was another winner. I brought a couple of plants in and cut off a few leaves at a time to throw in soups and stews all winter. Gives a great burst of greens for the winter months.
                                                >
                                                > Jennifer
                                                > Meaford, Canada


                                              • Gail Lloyd
                                                NZS is a perennial grown as a warm-weather annual, which just means that if it has the right conditions (hot weather & dry conditions; will not tolerate
                                                Message 23 of 26 , Aug 30, 2009
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                                                  NZS is a perennial grown as a warm-weather annual, which just means that if it has the right conditions (hot weather & dry conditions; will not tolerate frost), then it will be a perennial, if not, it will act like an annual & die each year. 
                                                  Gail

                                                  --- On Sun, 8/30/09, Jennifer Pittet <jennyp27@...> wrote:

                                                  From: Jennifer Pittet <jennyp27@...>
                                                  Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: edible house plants?
                                                  To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Date: Sunday, August 30, 2009, 6:53 AM

                                                   
                                                  Hi Greg,
                                                  I didn't know that they could be annuals or perennials. I kept them inside for one winter only, then re-planted them outside. Where can I find out more about the annual vs perennial bit.
                                                  I'm also planning to bring my sorrel in for the winter, because I'm moving and don't have another garden to put it in yet. I assume it should be fine. It's a perennial here.
                                                  Jennifer

                                                  On Sat, Aug 29, 2009 at 7:59 PM, hydrochar <bgmartin@myfairpoin t.net> wrote:
                                                   
                                                  Jennifer, New Zealand spinach is one plant I was planning to trial, I'm so happy to hear you had good luck with it. Some NZS plants are supposed to be perennials while other plants will be annuals. Did you keep yours for more than the winter? I'm wondering if it can do well for years in the house, or if it's better for just overwintering.
                                                  Thanks,
                                                  Greg
                                                  Maine, USA


                                                  --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com, "jenniferpittet" <jenniferpittet@ ...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > I've also had good results with growing parsley indoors over the winter. And New Zealand spinach was another winner. I brought a couple of plants in and cut off a few leaves at a time to throw in soups and stews all winter. Gives a great burst of greens for the winter months.
                                                  >
                                                  > Jennifer
                                                  > Meaford, Canada



                                                • hydrochar
                                                  Hi Jennifer, I read that bit about some individuals being annuals and other individuals being perennial in Eric Toensmeier s great book Perennial Vegetables .
                                                  Message 24 of 26 , Aug 30, 2009
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                                                    Hi Jennifer,
                                                    I read that bit about some individuals being annuals and other individuals being perennial in Eric Toensmeier's great book "Perennial Vegetables". According to Eric NZS has naturalized in Massachusettes and Wisconsin as a self seeding annual...wow!
                                                    Take care,
                                                    Greg

                                                    --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Pittet <jennyp27@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Hi Greg,
                                                    > I didn't know that they could be annuals or perennials. I kept them inside
                                                    > for one winter only, then re-planted them outside. Where can I find out more
                                                    > about the annual vs perennial bit.
                                                    > I'm also planning to bring my sorrel in for the winter, because I'm moving
                                                    > and don't have another garden to put it in yet. I assume it should be fine.
                                                    > It's a perennial here.
                                                    > Jennifer
                                                  • D
                                                    Also called Warrigal greens, Tetragonia species, native to Australia and New Zealand especially estuarine areas, fairly salt tolerant due to frequently
                                                    Message 25 of 26 , Aug 30, 2009
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                                                      Also called Warrigal greens, Tetragonia species, native to Australia and
                                                      New Zealand especially estuarine areas, fairly salt tolerant due to
                                                      frequently brackish tidal habitats.
                                                      A /bushfood/ favoured by indigenous Australians (and probably New
                                                      Zealanders).

                                                      In cooler temperate climates it can (unless in very sheltered sites) die
                                                      back in winter and regrow in summer, also self seeds very easily.
                                                      Grows to about 20 cms and can climb a little (more like scramble), but
                                                      has no woody stems or tendrils.
                                                      Not very threatening as a weed, but I am not familiar with its growth
                                                      habit in more tropical climes.
                                                      I have one in a pot tucked away in a corner and it hasn't died back this
                                                      winter, but it has been fairly mild.

                                                      I imagine it would be a good indoor plant.

                                                      Cheers
                                                      Deb
                                                      Griselda Mussett wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > What is New Zealand spinach?
                                                      >
                                                      > griselda
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > On 27 Aug 2009, at 19:41, jenniferpittet wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      >>
                                                      >>
                                                      >> I've also had good results with growing parsley indoors over the
                                                      >> winter. And New Zealand spinach was another winner. I brought a
                                                      >> couple of plants in and cut off a few leaves at a time to throw in
                                                      >> soups and stews all winter. Gives a great burst of greens for the
                                                      >> winter months.
                                                      >>
                                                      >> Jennifer
                                                      >> Meaford, Canada
                                                      >>
                                                      >> --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com <mailto:pfaf%40yahoogroups.com>,
                                                      >> "hydrochar" <bgmartin@.. .> wrote:
                                                      >> >
                                                      >> > As the days are getting shorter I'm trying to build a list of
                                                      >> edible plants that can be grown as house plants. What edible plants
                                                      >> have you had good luck with indoors?
                                                      >> >
                                                      >>
                                                      >
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      > The news isn't that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it's that
                                                      > they are so good for you they could save your life.*
                                                      > By David Bjerklie, TIME Magazine, October 20, 2003
                                                      > *Juice* * PLUS+* * Capsules contain 17 fruits, vegetables, oats and
                                                      > grains. The ingredients are * *apples* *, * *cranberries* *, * *dates*
                                                      > *, * *oranges* *, * *papaya* *, * *peaches* *, * *pineapples* *, *
                                                      > *beets* *, * *broccoli* *, * *carrots* *, * *cabbage* *, * *kale* *, *
                                                      > *tomatoes* *, * *parsley* *, * *garlic* *, * *spinach* *, * *rice
                                                      > bran* * (no gluten), and * *oats* * (no gluten). *
                                                      > *and ~ * *NEW * *- * *Juice* * * *PLUS+* * * *Vineyard Blend* * adds
                                                      > Blueberries* *, * *Cranberries, * *Concorde* * * *Grape, *
                                                      > *Blackberries* *, * *Bilberries,* * * *Grape Seed,* * * *Raspberry* *,
                                                      > Elderberries, * *Red Currants, and* * Black Currants. *
                                                      > *Check it out * *www.takejuiceplus. co.uk*
                                                      >
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      > *
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
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