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Creeping wood sorrel (Oxalis corniculata)

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  • david.keltie@gmail.com
    Most sites describe this as a weed . It s spreading rapidly everywhere in my garden (likes shade so presumably a forest garden suits it). Pretty yellow
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 16, 2009
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      Most sites describe this as a 'weed'. It's spreading rapidly
      everywhere in my garden (likes shade so presumably a forest garden
      suits it). Pretty yellow flowers but plant described as 'poisonous'.

      Anyone anything positive to say about it? Should I try and limit it's
      spread? (Difficult!)

      Many thanks, David
    • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
      Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it restricts the assimilation of
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 16, 2009
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        Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it restricts the assimilation of calcium.

        The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many plants - including rhubarb.

        All the best,
        Matthew

        Matthew Sleigh
        B and T World Seeds
        Paguignan
        34210 Aigues-Vives
        France
        matthew@...
        http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/
        fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: david.keltie@...
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: 8/16/09 1:36 PM
        Subject: [pfaf] Creeping wood sorrel (Oxalis corniculata)

        Most sites describe this as a 'weed'. It's spreading rapidly
        everywhere in my garden (likes shade so presumably a forest garden
        suits it). Pretty yellow flowers but plant described as 'poisonous'.

        Anyone anything positive to say about it? Should I try and limit it's
        spread? (Difficult!)

        Many thanks, David


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      • david.keltie@gmail.com
        So I should harvest it. Any recipes?! Thanks, David
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 16, 2009
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          So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!

          Thanks, David

          On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@...> wrote:
          > Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it restricts the assimilation of calcium.
          >
          > The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many plants - including rhubarb.
          >
          > All the best,
          > Matthew
          >
          > Matthew Sleigh
          > B and T World Seeds
          > Paguignan
          > 34210 Aigues-Vives
          > France
          > matthew@...
          > http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/
          > fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
          >
        • Johanna Knox
          Hi - sorry - I hope this doesn t seem spammy! I ve written up some of the ways I like to use Oxalis acetosella (which is abundant round where I live) on my
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 16, 2009
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            Hi - sorry - I hope this doesn't seem spammy! I've written up some of the ways I like to use Oxalis acetosella (which is abundant round where I live) on my blog here -

            http://wildpicnic.blogspot.com/2009/07/wood-sorrel-oxalis-acetosella.html

            I imagine you could do those same things with any of the little oxalises. (Hmm ... what would the plural be? 'Oxalises' looks strange!)

            Best wishes
            Johanna



            On Mon, Aug 17, 2009 at 7:57 AM, <david.keltie@...> wrote:
             

            So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!

            Thanks, David



            On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@...> wrote:
            > Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it restricts the assimilation of calcium.
            >
            > The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many plants - including rhubarb.
            >
            > All the best,
            > Matthew
            >
            > Matthew Sleigh
            > B and T World Seeds
            > Paguignan
            > 34210 Aigues-Vives
            > France
            > matthew@...
            > http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/
            > fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
            >

          • david.keltie@gmail.com
            OK there may be some (marginal) food/medicinal value but what about it s value in a forest garden? It is ground cover (ie it restricts other weed growth),
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 17, 2009
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              OK there may be some (marginal) food/medicinal value but what about
              it's value in a forest garden?

              It is ground cover (ie it restricts other 'weed' growth), it's little
              flowers are pretty but rather inconspicuous. But does it
              inhibit/encourage
              - soil structure/fertility?
              - other plants with better food value?
              - beneficial insects?

              If it's left to grow unrestricted will it invade the whole area or
              find a suitable niche for itself and die off elsewhere?

              (my partner complains it gets into the flower garden area and apart
              from swamping young seedlings, ants build nests around its creeping
              strands).

              Thanks, David

              On Mon, Aug 17, 2009 at 5:59 PM, D<swampwitch@...> wrote:
              > You should probably consult a naturopath before using it over a period
              > of time.
              > Usually this type of plant use and knowledge should ne restricted to
              > 'survival' use only, ie if you find yourself desperate for sustenance,
              > ie in times of disaster or starvation.
              > Deliberately restricting uptake of calcium could result in harm to
              > nerves, bones, etc. Also gall bladder I think may need removing if you
              > make a habit of this type of eating.
              > Cooking usually renders oxalic acids less harmful, but also destroys
              > Vitamin C, so it seems counter-productive to use it as a food on an
              > ongoing basis.
              >
              > Perhaps there is excessive worship of the humble weed in PC circles,
              > proving that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
              > If its a native species, try consulting the indigenous plant use history
              > in your area, even if that means exhuming old records from documents in
              > library arhives, and also various internet research.
              > Dont use yourself as the guinea pig.
              >
              > Personally I prefer parsley, still one of the top 10 cultivated plants
              > in terms of nutritional value.
              > Perennial spinach is another favourite, which is better tasting than
              > silver beet (another species which is toxic over time unless cooked, due
              > to oxalic acid content).
              >
              > Many herbs and plants, whilst they have a medicinal value, should only
              > be used to correct specific health conditions, and never ingested
              > regularly. More is not better!
              > The list of medicinal  plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis
              > is short indeed
              >
              > Safe eating,
              > D
              >
              > david.keltie@... wrote:
              >>
              >>
              >> So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!
              >>
              >> Thanks, David
              >>
              >> On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
              >> <mailto:matthew%40b-and-t-world-seeds.com>> wrote:
              >> > Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the
              >> plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it
              >> restricts the assimilation of calcium.
              >> >
              >> > The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many
              >> plants - including rhubarb.
              >> >
              >> > All the best,
              >> > Matthew
              >> >
              >> > Matthew Sleigh
              >> > B and T World Seeds
              >> > Paguignan
              >> > 34210 Aigues-Vives
              >> > France
              >> > matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
              >> <mailto:matthew%40b-and-t-world-seeds.com>
              >> > http://b-and- t-world-seeds. com/ <http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/>
              >> > fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
              >> >
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Ludd
              I read somewhere that it is a good idea to eat woodsorrel with cheese, for cheese neautralises the oxalic acid. Or does it just provide extra calcium to
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 17, 2009
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                I read somewhere that it is a good idea to eat woodsorrel with cheese,
                for cheese neautralises the oxalic acid. Or does it just provide extra
                calcium to compensate for the lesser uptake?
                Ludwig

                D wrote:
                > You should probably consult a naturopath before using it over a period
                > of time.
                > Usually this type of plant use and knowledge should ne restricted to
                > 'survival' use only, ie if you find yourself desperate for sustenance,
                > ie in times of disaster or starvation.
                > Deliberately restricting uptake of calcium could result in harm to
                > nerves, bones, etc. Also gall bladder I think may need removing if you
                > make a habit of this type of eating.
                > Cooking usually renders oxalic acids less harmful, but also destroys
                > Vitamin C, so it seems counter-productive to use it as a food on an
                > ongoing basis.
                >
                > Perhaps there is excessive worship of the humble weed in PC circles,
                > proving that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
                > If its a native species, try consulting the indigenous plant use history
                > in your area, even if that means exhuming old records from documents in
                > library arhives, and also various internet research.
                > Dont use yourself as the guinea pig.
                >
                > Personally I prefer parsley, still one of the top 10 cultivated plants
                > in terms of nutritional value.
                > Perennial spinach is another favourite, which is better tasting than
                > silver beet (another species which is toxic over time unless cooked, due
                > to oxalic acid content).
                >
                > Many herbs and plants, whilst they have a medicinal value, should only
                > be used to correct specific health conditions, and never ingested
                > regularly. More is not better!
                > The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis
                > is short indeed
                >
                > Safe eating,
                > D
                >
                > david.keltie@... wrote:
                >
                >>
                >>
                >> So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!
                >>
                >> Thanks, David
                >>
                >> On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                >> <mailto:matthew%40b-and-t-world-seeds.com>> wrote:
                >>
                >>> Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the
                >>>
                >> plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it
                >> restricts the assimilation of calcium.
                >>
                >>> The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many
                >>>
                >> plants - including rhubarb.
                >>
                >>> All the best,
                >>> Matthew
                >>>
                >>> Matthew Sleigh
                >>> B and T World Seeds
                >>> Paguignan
                >>> 34210 Aigues-Vives
                >>> France
                >>> matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                >>>
                >> <mailto:matthew%40b-and-t-world-seeds.com>
                >>
                >>> http://b-and- t-world-seeds. com/ <http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/>
                >>> fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
                >>>
                >>>
                >>
                >
                >
                >
              • Patty Martz
                D said: The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis is short indeed PLEASE, what IS the SHORT LIST of medicinal plants which
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 17, 2009
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                  "D" said:
                  "The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis is short indeed"

                  PLEASE, what IS the SHORT LIST of medicinal plants which are SAFE to use on an ONGOING BASIS???

                  Thanks,
                  PLMartz


                  From: Ludd <the_pooh_way@...>
                  To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, August 17, 2009 7:01:19 AM
                  Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: Creeping wood sorrel (Oxalis corniculata)

                   

                  I read somewhere that it is a good idea to eat woodsorrel with cheese,
                  for cheese neautralises the oxalic acid. Or does it just provide extra
                  calcium to compensate for the lesser uptake?
                  Ludwig

                  D wrote:

                  > You should probably consult a naturopath before using it over a period
                  > of time.
                  > Usually this type of plant use and knowledge should ne restricted to
                  > 'survival' use only, ie if you find yourself desperate for sustenance,
                  > ie in times of disaster or starvation.
                  > Deliberately restricting uptake of calcium could result in harm to
                  > nerves, bones, etc. Also gall bladder I think may need removing if you
                  > make a habit of this type of eating.
                  > Cooking usually renders oxalic acids less harmful, but also destroys
                  > Vitamin C, so it seems counter-productive to use it as a food on an
                  > ongoing basis.
                  >
                  > Perhaps there is excessive worship of the humble weed in PC circles,
                  > proving that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
                  > If its a native species, try consulting the indigenous plant use history
                  > in your area, even if that means exhuming old records from documents in
                  > library arhives, and also various internet research.
                  > Dont use yourself as the guinea pig.
                  >
                  > Personally I prefer parsley, still one of the top 10 cultivated plants
                  > in terms of nutritional value.
                  > Perennial spinach is another favourite, which is better tasting than
                  > silver beet (another species which is toxic over time unless cooked, due
                  > to oxalic acid content).
                  >
                  > Many herbs and plants, whilst they have a medicinal value, should only
                  > be used to correct specific health conditions, and never ingested
                  > regularly. More is not better!
                  > The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis
                  > is short indeed
                  >
                  > Safe eating,
                  > D
                  >
                  > david.keltie@ gmail.com wrote:
                  >
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!
                  >>
                  >> Thanks, David
                  >>
                  >> On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                  >> <mailto:matthew% 40b-and-t- world-seeds. com>> wrote:
                  >>
                  >>> Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the
                  >>>
                  >> plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it
                  >> restricts the assimilation of calcium.
                  >>
                  >>> The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many
                  >>>
                  >> plants - including rhubarb.
                  >>
                  >>> All the best,
                  >>> Matthew
                  >>>
                  >>> Matthew Sleigh
                  >>> B and T World Seeds
                  >>> Paguignan
                  >>> 34210 Aigues-Vives
                  >>> France
                  >>> matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                  >>>
                  >> <mailto:matthew% 40b-and-t- world-seeds. com>
                  >>
                  >>> http://b-and- t-world-seeds. com/ <http://b-and- t-world-seeds. com/>
                  >>> fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >


                • Margi
                  Herbal tonics are plants that are considered to be safe to use on an ongoing basis. These are the herbs that are primarily nutritive in action. They include
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 17, 2009
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                    Herbal tonics are plants that are considered to be safe to use on an
                    ongoing basis. These are the herbs that are primarily nutritive in
                    action. They include nettles, skullcap, and oats, but there are many
                    others. You can research herbal tonic on the internet for more info.

                    ~margi

                    Patty Martz wrote:
                    >
                    > "D" said:
                    > "The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing
                    > basis is short indeed"
                    >
                    > PLEASE, what IS the SHORT LIST of medicinal plants which are SAFE to
                    > use on an ONGOING BASIS???
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > PLMartz
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    > *From:* Ludd <the_pooh_way@...>
                    > *To:* pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                    > *Sent:* Monday, August 17, 2009 7:01:19 AM
                    > *Subject:* Re: [pfaf] Re: Creeping wood sorrel (Oxalis corniculata)
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I read somewhere that it is a good idea to eat woodsorrel with cheese,
                    > for cheese neautralises the oxalic acid. Or does it just provide extra
                    > calcium to compensate for the lesser uptake?
                    > Ludwig
                    >
                    > D wrote:
                    > > You should probably consult a naturopath before using it over a period
                    > > of time.
                    > > Usually this type of plant use and knowledge should ne restricted to
                    > > 'survival' use only, ie if you find yourself desperate for sustenance,
                    > > ie in times of disaster or starvation.
                    > > Deliberately restricting uptake of calcium could result in harm to
                    > > nerves, bones, etc. Also gall bladder I think may need removing if you
                    > > make a habit of this type of eating.
                    > > Cooking usually renders oxalic acids less harmful, but also destroys
                    > > Vitamin C, so it seems counter-productive to use it as a food on an
                    > > ongoing basis.
                    > >
                    > > Perhaps there is excessive worship of the humble weed in PC circles,
                    > > proving that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
                    > > If its a native species, try consulting the indigenous plant use
                    > history
                    > > in your area, even if that means exhuming old records from documents in
                    > > library arhives, and also various internet research.
                    > > Dont use yourself as the guinea pig.
                    > >
                    > > Personally I prefer parsley, still one of the top 10 cultivated plants
                    > > in terms of nutritional value.
                    > > Perennial spinach is another favourite, which is better tasting than
                    > > silver beet (another species which is toxic over time unless cooked,
                    > due
                    > > to oxalic acid content).
                    > >
                    > > Many herbs and plants, whilst they have a medicinal value, should only
                    > > be used to correct specific health conditions, and never ingested
                    > > regularly. More is not better!
                    > > The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis
                    > > is short indeed
                    > >
                    > > Safe eating,
                    > > D
                    > >
                    > > david.keltie@ gmail.com <mailto:david.keltie%40gmail.com> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >>
                    > >> So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!
                    > >>
                    > >> Thanks, David
                    > >>
                    > >> On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                    > >> <mailto:matthew% 40b-and-t- world-seeds. com>> wrote:
                    > >>
                    > >>> Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the
                    > >>>
                    > >> plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it
                    > >> restricts the assimilation of calcium.
                    > >>
                    > >>> The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many
                    > >>>
                    > >> plants - including rhubarb.
                    > >>
                    > >>> All the best,
                    > >>> Matthew
                    > >>>
                    > >>> Matthew Sleigh
                    > >>> B and T World Seeds
                    > >>> Paguignan
                    > >>> 34210 Aigues-Vives
                    > >>> France
                    > >>> matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                    > >>>
                    > >> <mailto:matthew% 40b-and-t- world-seeds. com>
                    > >>
                    > >>> http://b-and- t-world-seeds. com/ <http://b-and- t-world-seeds.
                    > com/ <http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/>>
                    > >>> fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
                    > >>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • D
                    You should probably consult a naturopath before using it over a period of time. Usually this type of plant use and knowledge should ne restricted to survival
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 17, 2009
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                      You should probably consult a naturopath before using it over a period
                      of time.
                      Usually this type of plant use and knowledge should ne restricted to
                      'survival' use only, ie if you find yourself desperate for sustenance,
                      ie in times of disaster or starvation.
                      Deliberately restricting uptake of calcium could result in harm to
                      nerves, bones, etc. Also gall bladder I think may need removing if you
                      make a habit of this type of eating.
                      Cooking usually renders oxalic acids less harmful, but also destroys
                      Vitamin C, so it seems counter-productive to use it as a food on an
                      ongoing basis.

                      Perhaps there is excessive worship of the humble weed in PC circles,
                      proving that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
                      If its a native species, try consulting the indigenous plant use history
                      in your area, even if that means exhuming old records from documents in
                      library arhives, and also various internet research.
                      Dont use yourself as the guinea pig.

                      Personally I prefer parsley, still one of the top 10 cultivated plants
                      in terms of nutritional value.
                      Perennial spinach is another favourite, which is better tasting than
                      silver beet (another species which is toxic over time unless cooked, due
                      to oxalic acid content).

                      Many herbs and plants, whilst they have a medicinal value, should only
                      be used to correct specific health conditions, and never ingested
                      regularly. More is not better!
                      The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis
                      is short indeed

                      Safe eating,
                      D

                      david.keltie@... wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!
                      >
                      > Thanks, David
                      >
                      > On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                      > <mailto:matthew%40b-and-t-world-seeds.com>> wrote:
                      > > Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the
                      > plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it
                      > restricts the assimilation of calcium.
                      > >
                      > > The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many
                      > plants - including rhubarb.
                      > >
                      > > All the best,
                      > > Matthew
                      > >
                      > > Matthew Sleigh
                      > > B and T World Seeds
                      > > Paguignan
                      > > 34210 Aigues-Vives
                      > > France
                      > > matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                      > <mailto:matthew%40b-and-t-world-seeds.com>
                      > > http://b-and- t-world-seeds. com/ <http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/>
                      > > fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                    • Steve
                      Hi David, I m Steve, in Bermuda. The Oxalis here (creeping - either O. corniculata or O. stricta or both - and clumping - maybe O. griffithii) form dense mats.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Aug 17, 2009
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                        Hi David,

                        I'm Steve, in Bermuda.


                        The Oxalis here (creeping - either O. corniculata or O. stricta or
                        both - and clumping - maybe O. griffithii) form dense mats. Both
                        reproduce prolifically, and I know of no reliable (ecologically
                        friendly) method of removing them once they are established besides
                        manual labor (pulling it all out by hand).
                        The creeping one makes little okra-shaped pods which are spring loaded
                        and can fling the seed up to 8 or 10 feet away. It's even a bit
                        painful if you trigger it with your hand while gardening and it flings
                        the seeds in your face.
                        The clumping type reproduces from bulblets underground. If you pull
                        this wood sorrel from the ground, you are likely helping it to spread,
                        because the bulblets are dragged apart and then germinate seperately
                        in their own new clumps.
                        Now, my way of approaching this was to lay a light barrier over the
                        whole patch and build a no-dig bed on top of it. Sure, it comes back
                        eventually, but in the meanwhile the aerial parts provide you with
                        some nice organic material under your beds. In a forest garden
                        situation, you may wish to sheet mulch in order to keep the wood
                        sorrell down in order to plant other things. It isn't going to hurt
                        your efforts as far as tree planting goes.

                        I'm off to bed.

                        Peace.

                        Steve.



                        --
                        "The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force."

                        - Thomas Jefferson
                      • D
                        I have only ever heard of two, linden flowers and chamomile. I also use rosehips (not exactly a herb). The other tea I have here is peppermint but I use it
                        Message 11 of 11 , Aug 18, 2009
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                          I have only ever heard of two, linden flowers and chamomile. I also use
                          rosehips (not exactly a herb). The other tea I have here is peppermint
                          but I use it rarely.
                          Its handy to have on hand if someone has a food allergy and accidentally
                          imbibes something that can make them sick, in which case a cup of
                          peppermint tea seems to negate the allergen.
                          I take herbal medicine as a matter of course, that is, every year I take
                          a course of a particular herbal blend, but I don't take them every day
                          of every year.
                          If they work one shouldn't have to! But I do rotate them, and try to
                          take each medicine once per year, so am often taking something... liver
                          detox, lymphatic drainage, immune system tonic, eg.

                          Herbs which are dried are often taken in larger quantities than fresh
                          herbs, something people may not think about (In terms of dosage).
                          Self prescribing isnt a great substitute for the skilled practitioner,
                          esp if you are really sick, or if whatever you are using isnt having the
                          desired effect.
                          A competent herbalist can effect a pretty good cure.

                          We are very lucky in Australia that our private health system has a
                          thing called "standard extras" insurance, which for a small investment,
                          pays a pretty good return.
                          For around $17 AU to $34AU per month, one receives about 66% rebate on
                          10 visits yearly to each of optical, dental, naturopathic, homeopathic,
                          physio, chiropractic etc etc.
                          Which is PRETTY BLOODY GOOD VALUE!

                          CHEERS,
                          Deb






                          Patty Martz wrote:
                          >
                          > "D" said:
                          > "The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing
                          > basis is short indeed"
                          >
                          > PLEASE, what IS the SHORT LIST of medicinal plants which are SAFE to
                          > use on an ONGOING BASIS???
                          >
                          > Thanks,
                          > PLMartz
                          >
                          > *From:* Ludd <the_pooh_way@ yahoo.co. uk>
                          > *To:* pfaf@yahoogroups. com
                          > *Sent:* Monday, August 17, 2009 7:01:19 AM
                          > *Subject:* Re: [pfaf] Re: Creeping wood sorrel (Oxalis corniculata)
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > I read somewhere that it is a good idea to eat woodsorrel with cheese,
                          > for cheese neautralises the oxalic acid. Or does it just provide extra
                          > calcium to compensate for the lesser uptake?
                          > Ludwig
                          >
                          > D wrote:
                          > > You should probably consult a naturopath before using it over a period
                          > > of time.
                          > > Usually this type of plant use and knowledge should ne restricted to
                          > > 'survival' use only, ie if you find yourself desperate for sustenance,
                          > > ie in times of disaster or starvation.
                          > > Deliberately restricting uptake of calcium could result in harm to
                          > > nerves, bones, etc. Also gall bladder I think may need removing if you
                          > > make a habit of this type of eating.
                          > > Cooking usually renders oxalic acids less harmful, but also destroys
                          > > Vitamin C, so it seems counter-productive to use it as a food on an
                          > > ongoing basis.
                          > >
                          > > Perhaps there is excessive worship of the humble weed in PC circles,
                          > > proving that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
                          > > If its a native species, try consulting the indigenous plant use
                          > history
                          > > in your area, even if that means exhuming old records from documents in
                          > > library arhives, and also various internet research.
                          > > Dont use yourself as the guinea pig.
                          > >
                          > > Personally I prefer parsley, still one of the top 10 cultivated plants
                          > > in terms of nutritional value.
                          > > Perennial spinach is another favourite, which is better tasting than
                          > > silver beet (another species which is toxic over time unless cooked,
                          > due
                          > > to oxalic acid content).
                          > >
                          > > Many herbs and plants, whilst they have a medicinal value, should only
                          > > be used to correct specific health conditions, and never ingested
                          > > regularly. More is not better!
                          > > The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis
                          > > is short indeed
                          > >
                          > > Safe eating,
                          > > D
                          > >
                          > > david.keltie@ gmail.com <mailto:david.keltie%40gmail.com> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!
                          > >>
                          > >> Thanks, David
                          > >>
                          > >> On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                          > >> <mailto:matthew% 40b-and-t- world-seeds. com>> wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >>> Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the
                          > >>>
                          > >> plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it
                          > >> restricts the assimilation of calcium.
                          > >>
                          > >>> The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many
                          > >>>
                          > >> plants - including rhubarb.
                          > >>
                          > >>> All the best,
                          > >>> Matthew
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Matthew Sleigh
                          > >>> B and T World Seeds
                          > >>> Paguignan
                          > >>> 34210 Aigues-Vives
                          > >>> France
                          > >>> matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
                          > >>>
                          > >> <mailto:matthew% 40b-and-t- world-seeds. com>
                          > >>
                          > >>> http://b-and- t-world-seeds. com/ <http://b-and- t-world-seeds.
                          > com/ <http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/>>
                          > >>> fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
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