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black knot in plums

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  • jenniferpittet
    Hello from southern Georgian Bay, I have some black knot at the base of the trunk of a little plum tree I planted several years ago. Because of the location of
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 16, 2009
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      Hello from southern Georgian Bay,

      I have some black knot at the base of the trunk of a little plum tree I planted several years ago. Because of the location of the fungus, I can't cut it out. Any suggestions for something to treat this with....something I can apply to kill or contain it?

      This is what a fact sheet from Cornell says:

      "If pruning is not possible because knots are present on major scaffold limbs or the trunk, they can be removed by cutting away the diseased tissue down to the wood and out at least 1/2 inch (1 cm) beyond the edge of the knot"

      Do they mean cut right into the wood? I assume that any cutting I do should be in the fall.

      Also, just wanted to thank everyone who gave me ideas about reclaiming a mature orchard. I did some more research, as suggested, and started implementing some of your ideas. Much appreciated!

      Thanks.

      Jennifer
    • jenniferpittet
      Hello from southern Georgian Bay, I have some black knot at the base of the trunk of a little plum tree I planted several years ago. Because of the location of
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 16, 2009
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        Hello from southern Georgian Bay,

        I have some black knot at the base of the trunk of a little plum tree I planted several years ago. Because of the location of the fungus, I can't cut it out. Any suggestions for something to treat this with....something I can apply to kill or contain it?

        This is what a fact sheet from Cornell says:

        "If pruning is not possible because knots are present on major scaffold limbs or the trunk, they can be removed by cutting away the diseased tissue down to the wood and out at least 1/2 inch (1 cm) beyond the edge of the knot"

        Do they mean cut right into the wood? I assume that any cutting I do should be in the fall.

        Also, just wanted to thank everyone who gave me ideas about reclaiming a mature orchard. I did some more research, as suggested, and started implementing some of your ideas. Much appreciated!

        Thanks.

        Jennifer
      • Infowolf1@aol.com
        I have no practical experience in this sort of stuff. Sounds like does mean cutting through the fungus until the clean wood shows. As for what to put on it,
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 19, 2009
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          I have no practical experience in this sort of stuff. Sounds like does
          mean cutting through the fungus until the clean wood shows.
           
          As for what to put on it, or rather into the cuts, I would suggest
          a mix of neem oil and tea tree oil, minimal dilution. I have used
          that on black mold in a house.
           
          Mary Christine
           
          In a message dated 8/19/2009 3:11:42 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, jenniferpittet@... writes:
           

          Hello from southern Georgian Bay,

          I have some black knot at the base of the trunk of a little plum tree I planted several years ago. Because of the location of the fungus, I can't cut it out. Any suggestions for something to treat this with....something I can apply to kill or contain it?

          This is what a fact sheet from Cornell says:

          "If pruning is not possible because knots are present on major scaffold limbs or the trunk, they can be removed by cutting away the diseased tissue down to the wood and out at least 1/2 inch (1 cm) beyond the edge of the knot"

          Do they mean cut right into the wood? I assume that any cutting I do should be in the fall.

          Also, just wanted to thank everyone who gave me ideas about reclaiming a mature orchard. I did some more research, as suggested, and started implementing some of your ideas. Much appreciated!

          Thanks.

          Jennifer

        • Joseph A. Cleary
          Dear Jennifer: Every state has horticulture agents who deal with the problems with the soil and farms in your area. Some times such is caused by bore worms
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 19, 2009
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                    Dear Jennifer:
                        Every state has horticulture agents who deal with the problems with the soil and farms in your area. Some times such is caused by bore worms which bore in under the bark of the tree's. Some times if you catch it early enough you can separate the worms from their nests in the bark or under the bark. Other times you can take Boric Acid in powdered form and pour it around the base of the tree and it'll kill the worms.
                        If it's not worms but a fungal infestation you'll have to change the Ph factor in the soil.
                        Good Luck.
            Shalom, Shalom, Yosef  
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, August 16, 2009 7:49 AM
            Subject: [Norton AntiSpam] [pfaf] black knot in plums

             

            Hello from southern Georgian Bay,

            I have some black knot at the base of the trunk of a little plum tree I planted several years ago. Because of the location of the fungus, I can't cut it out. Any suggestions for something to treat this with....something I can apply to kill or contain it?

            This is what a fact sheet from Cornell says:

            "If pruning is not possible because knots are present on major scaffold limbs or the trunk, they can be removed by cutting away the diseased tissue down to the wood and out at least 1/2 inch (1 cm) beyond the edge of the knot"

            Do they mean cut right into the wood? I assume that any cutting I do should be in the fall.

            Also, just wanted to thank everyone who gave me ideas about reclaiming a mature orchard. I did some more research, as suggested, and started implementing some of your ideas. Much appreciated!

            Thanks.

            Jennifer

          • evenivity
            ... I have no experiance of this but I would cut out right into the wood removing all + more But dont cut right round or no sap will get up You could then
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 20, 2009
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              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "jenniferpittet" <jenniferpittet@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello from southern Georgian Bay,
              >
              > I have some black knot at the base of the trunk of a little plum tree I planted several years ago. Because of the location of the fungus, I can't cut it out. Any suggestions for something to treat this with....something I can apply to kill or contain it?
              >
              > This is what a fact sheet from Cornell says:
              >
              > "If pruning is not possible because knots are present on major scaffold limbs or the trunk, they can be removed by cutting away the diseased tissue down to the wood and out at least 1/2 inch (1 cm) beyond the edge of the knot"
              >
              > Do they mean cut right into the wood? I assume that any cutting I do should be in the fall.
              >
              > Also, just wanted to thank everyone who gave me ideas about reclaiming a mature orchard. I did some more research, as suggested, and started implementing some of your ideas. Much appreciated!
              >
              > Thanks.
              >
              > Jennifer
              >

              I have no experiance of this but I would cut out right into the wood removing all + more
              But dont cut right round or no sap will get up

              You could then graft one of its own branches or a number over the cut as a repair grafting of own wood should be sucessfull and is a good solution to tree damage especially established works for canker to
              I do know about grafting and can give more info if you wish
              Brian
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