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Re: [pfaf] air potato

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  • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
    Hi Greg, I ve been growing Dioscorea bulbifera inside, in containers, and they made loads of tubers. The conditions were quite low light, never very hot or
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 16, 2009
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      Hi Greg,

      I've been growing Dioscorea bulbifera inside, in containers, and they made loads of tubers.
      The conditions were quite low light, never very hot or cold (between 50°F and 90°F), high humidity - I think it is high humidity that encourages the aerial tubers. You will need to give them something to climb :)

      Dioscorea alata "Ubi" is a nice edible Air Potato too
      I'll get a photo uploaded this afternoon :)

      All the best,
      Matthew

      Matthew Sleigh
      B and T World Seeds
      Paguignan
      34210 Aigues-Vives
      France
      matthew@...
      http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/
      fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: bgmartin@...
      To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: 8/16/09 6:47 AM
      Subject: [pfaf] air potato

      Two questions.
      Does anyone know of a source of the mild tasting, domesticated varieties of air potato, Dioscorea bulbifera? I live in the US and haven't been able to find them here.
      Also, I've read they make good houseplants...anyone have experience with this to share? I live in Maine and I'll have to keep them in the house for the winter. I was wondering if they'd be able to form aerial tubers when grown in containers.
      Thanks,
      Greg



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    • Michael Porter
      I raise several varieties,that are good flavored,  that produce well in pots, - D. alata, D.rotundata, and D. batatas, --see some info on my web site, or send
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 16, 2009
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        I raise several varieties,that are good flavored,  that produce well in pots, - D. alata, D.rotundata, and D. batatas, --see some info on my web site, or send me an e-mail to ask some ???    www.michaels4gardens.com   blessings , --  Michael

        --- On Sun, 8/16/09, hydrochar <bgmartin@...> wrote:

        From: hydrochar <bgmartin@...>
        Subject: [pfaf] air potato
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, August 16, 2009, 6:19 AM

         
        Two questions.
        Does anyone know of a source of the mild tasting, domesticated varieties of air potato, Dioscorea bulbifera? I live in the US and haven't been able to find them here.
        Also, I've read they make good houseplants. ..anyone have experience with this to share? I live in Maine and I'll have to keep them in the house for the winter. I was wondering if they'd be able to form aerial tubers when grown in containers.
        Thanks,
        Greg

      • Denise-Christine
        All, please use care if you live in a warm, humid climate and decide to grow and eat Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) or D. alata/D. batatas--all of which are
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 18, 2009
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          All, please use care if you live in a warm, humid climate and decide to grow and eat Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) or D. alata/D. batatas--all of which are listed as exotic invasives in some southern states of the U.S. Climate (cold) seems to limit spread.

          Regarding D. bulbifera: This very useful but non-native vine can grow up to 20 meters and is an invasive exotic in several Southern states

          Info below is from the Smithsonian Marine Station web site:

          Statewide infestation by Dioscorea bulbifera prompted the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council to include the species in its list of the top 10 Most Widespread Invasive Plants in Florida, i.e., nonindigenous plants with the most county occurrence records.

          Possible Economic Consequences of Invasion:
          Dioscorea bulbifera is listed as a Category I invasive exotic plant in Florida, indicating that the species is currently altering native plant communities by displacing native species and changing community structures or ecological functions. Asexual propagation by means of bulbils that drop off of parent vines to the ground in abundance ensure that eradication of the plant is exceedingly difficult once it has invaded an area.

          In many parts of the world the tubers and bulbils of D. bulbifera are used as food and the plant is cultivated as an agricultural crop. The plant has also long been used as a folk medicine including use as an analgesic, aphrodisiac, diuretic, and a rejuvenative tonic. The steroid diosgenin, an active component of birth control pills, is extracted from the plant as is the anti-fungal compound dihydrorodioscorine
        • Geir Flatabø
          Anyone of theedible / useful Dioscoreas that are Cold hardy . standing below freezing temperatures also on tubers ?? Geir Flatabø 2009/8/18 Denise-Christine
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 18, 2009
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            Anyone of theedible / useful Dioscoreas that are Cold hardy .
            standing below freezing temperatures also on tubers ??

            Geir Flatabø

            2009/8/18 Denise-Christine <denise_for_peace@...>
            All, please use care if you live in a warm, humid climate and decide to grow and eat Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) or D. alata/D. batatas--all of which are listed as exotic invasives in some southern states of the U.S.  Climate (cold) seems to limit spread.

            Regarding D. bulbifera:  This very useful but non-native vine can grow up to 20 meters and is an invasive exotic in several Southern states

            Info below is from the Smithsonian Marine Station web site:

            Statewide infestation by Dioscorea bulbifera prompted the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council to include the species in its list of the top 10 Most Widespread Invasive Plants in Florida, i.e., nonindigenous plants with the most county occurrence records.

            Possible Economic Consequences of Invasion:
            Dioscorea bulbifera is listed as a Category I invasive exotic plant in Florida, indicating that the species is currently altering native plant communities by displacing native species and changing community structures or ecological functions. Asexual propagation by means of bulbils that drop off of parent vines to the ground in abundance ensure that eradication of the plant is exceedingly difficult once it has invaded an area.

            In many parts of the world the tubers and bulbils of D. bulbifera are used as food and the plant is cultivated as an agricultural crop. The plant has also long been used as a folk medicine including use as an analgesic, aphrodisiac, diuretic, and a rejuvenative tonic. The steroid diosgenin, an active component of birth control pills, is extracted from the plant as is the anti-fungal compound dihydrorodioscorine



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          • Michael Porter
            Dioscorea batatas , Wild Chinese Yam, or Cinamon vine is edible and very good, --it is hardy to zone 5 ... From: Geir Flatabø Subject: Re:
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 18, 2009
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              Dioscorea batatas , Wild Chinese Yam, or Cinamon vine is edible and very good, --it is hardy to zone 5

              --- On Tue, 8/18/09, Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:

              From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] DANGER: Air Potato--Exotic Invasive
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2009, 5:56 PM

               
              Anyone of theedible / useful Dioscoreas that are Cold hardy .
              standing below freezing temperatures also on tubers ??

              Geir Flatabø

              2009/8/18 Denise-Christine <denise_for_peace@ yahoo.com>
              All, please use care if you live in a warm, humid climate and decide to grow and eat Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) or D. alata/D. batatas--all of which are listed as exotic invasives in some southern states of the U.S.  Climate (cold) seems to limit spread.

              Regarding D. bulbifera:  This very useful but non-native vine can grow up to 20 meters and is an invasive exotic in several Southern states

              Info below is from the Smithsonian Marine Station web site:

              Statewide infestation by Dioscorea bulbifera prompted the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council to include the species in its list of the top 10 Most Widespread Invasive Plants in Florida, i.e., nonindigenous plants with the most county occurrence records.

              Possible Economic Consequences of Invasion:
              Dioscorea bulbifera is listed as a Category I invasive exotic plant in Florida, indicating that the species is currently altering native plant communities by displacing native species and changing community structures or ecological functions. Asexual propagation by means of bulbils that drop off of parent vines to the ground in abundance ensure that eradication of the plant is exceedingly difficult once it has invaded an area.

              In many parts of the world the tubers and bulbils of D. bulbifera are used as food and the plant is cultivated as an agricultural crop. The plant has also long been used as a folk medicine including use as an analgesic, aphrodisiac, diuretic, and a rejuvenative tonic. The steroid diosgenin, an active component of birth control pills, is extracted from the plant as is the anti-fungal compound dihydrorodioscorine



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            • Geir Flatabø
              Any esy ources of these -- or anyone having tubers I could try in Norway ?? I have D batatas (?) - from Japanese source, very slow starting growing in spring,
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 19, 2009
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                Any esy ources of these --
                or anyone having tubers I could try in Norway ??
                 
                I have D batatas (?) - from Japanese source,
                very slow starting growing in spring, and not hardy...
                but OK in a green house / conservatory...
                 
                Geir Flatabø

                2009/8/19 Michael Porter <michaels4gardens@...>


                Dioscorea batatas , Wild Chinese Yam, or Cinamon vine is edible and very good, --it is hardy to zone 5

                --- On Tue, 8/18/09, Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:

                From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
                Subject: Re: [pfaf] DANGER: Air Potato--Exotic Invasive
                To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2009, 5:56 PM


                 
                Anyone of theedible / useful Dioscoreas that are Cold hardy .
                standing below freezing temperatures also on tubers ??

                Geir Flatabø

                2009/8/18 Denise-Christine <denise_for_peace@ yahoo.com>
                All, please use care if you live in a warm, humid climate and decide to grow and eat Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) or D. alata/D. batatas--all of which are listed as exotic invasives in some southern states of the U.S.  Climate (cold) seems to limit spread.

                Regarding D. bulbifera:  This very useful but non-native vine can grow up to 20 meters and is an invasive exotic in several Southern states

                Info below is from the Smithsonian Marine Station web site:

                Statewide infestation by Dioscorea bulbifera prompted the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council to include the species in its list of the top 10 Most Widespread Invasive Plants in Florida, i.e., nonindigenous plants with the most county occurrence records.

                Possible Economic Consequences of Invasion:
                Dioscorea bulbifera is listed as a Category I invasive exotic plant in Florida, indicating that the species is currently altering native plant communities by displacing native species and changing community structures or ecological functions. Asexual propagation by means of bulbils that drop off of parent vines to the ground in abundance ensure that eradication of the plant is exceedingly difficult once it has invaded an area.

                In many parts of the world the tubers and bulbils of D. bulbifera are used as food and the plant is cultivated as an agricultural crop. The plant has also long been used as a folk medicine including use as an analgesic, aphrodisiac, diuretic, and a rejuvenative tonic. The steroid diosgenin, an active component of birth control pills, is extracted from the plant as is the anti-fungal compound dihydrorodioscorine



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              • Michael Porter
                Mine grow well here, [in Florida US]  I grow them with other Yams, --as they are first to come up, and have time to  make tubercles before the others cover
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 19, 2009
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                  Mine grow well here, [in Florida US]  I grow them with other Yams, --as they are first to come up, and have time to  make tubercles before the others cover them up, -- I don't know if I am allowed to ship to Norway, --but if so, --I would send you some, --  Michael Porter  www.michaels4gardens.com

                  --- On Wed, 8/19/09, Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:

                  From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@...>
                  Subject: Re: [pfaf] DANGER: Air Potato--Exotic Invasive
                  To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Wednesday, August 19, 2009, 4:23 AM

                   
                  Any esy ources of these --
                  or anyone having tubers I could try in Norway ??
                   
                  I have D batatas (?) - from Japanese source,
                  very slow starting growing in spring, and not hardy...
                  but OK in a green house / conservatory. ..
                   
                  Geir Flatabø

                  2009/8/19 Michael Porter <michaels4gardens@ yahoo.com>


                  Dioscorea batatas , Wild Chinese Yam, or Cinamon vine is edible and very good, --it is hardy to zone 5

                  --- On Tue, 8/18/09, Geir Flatabø <geirf@ulvik. org> wrote:

                  From: Geir Flatabø <geirf@ulvik. org>
                  Subject: Re: [pfaf] DANGER: Air Potato--Exotic Invasive
                  To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2009, 5:56 PM


                   
                  Anyone of theedible / useful Dioscoreas that are Cold hardy .
                  standing below freezing temperatures also on tubers ??

                  Geir Flatabø

                  2009/8/18 Denise-Christine <denise_for_peace@ yahoo.com>
                  All, please use care if you live in a warm, humid climate and decide to grow and eat Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) or D. alata/D. batatas--all of which are listed as exotic invasives in some southern states of the U.S.  Climate (cold) seems to limit spread.

                  Regarding D. bulbifera:  This very useful but non-native vine can grow up to 20 meters and is an invasive exotic in several Southern states

                  Info below is from the Smithsonian Marine Station web site:

                  Statewide infestation by Dioscorea bulbifera prompted the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council to include the species in its list of the top 10 Most Widespread Invasive Plants in Florida, i.e., nonindigenous plants with the most county occurrence records.

                  Possible Economic Consequences of Invasion:
                  Dioscorea bulbifera is listed as a Category I invasive exotic plant in Florida, indicating that the species is currently altering native plant communities by displacing native species and changing community structures or ecological functions. Asexual propagation by means of bulbils that drop off of parent vines to the ground in abundance ensure that eradication of the plant is exceedingly difficult once it has invaded an area.

                  In many parts of the world the tubers and bulbils of D. bulbifera are used as food and the plant is cultivated as an agricultural crop. The plant has also long been used as a folk medicine including use as an analgesic, aphrodisiac, diuretic, and a rejuvenative tonic. The steroid diosgenin, an active component of birth control pills, is extracted from the plant as is the anti-fungal compound dihydrorodioscorine



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