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Yarrow

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  • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
    Gail, it really makes no difference whether the seedling picture is Yarrow or Pineapple Weed, the other photographs are certainly not Yarrow - the question was
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 13, 2009
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      Gail, it really makes no difference whether the seedling picture is Yarrow or Pineapple Weed, the other photographs are certainly not Yarrow - the question was about Pineapple Weed growing on baseball fields.

      Steve Brill does say that young Yarrow and Pineapple Weed could be confused, perhaps he should not have called the young plants rosettes.

      Yarrow:
      http://www.ppws.vt.edu/scott/weed_id/achmi.htm

      All the best,
      Matt

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: geirf@...
      To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: 7/13/09 5:49 PM
      Subject: Re: [pfaf] wHERE ARE THE OWNERS OF PFAF

      In this link
      there is a picture of a "basal rosette" - leaves.
      THe pineapple weed is annual and have no basal rosette,
      the picture is obviously from
      Achillea millefolium ---
      Geir Flatab�

      2009/7/10

      > maybe this page ?
      >
      > http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Pineappleweed.html
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: manofpeace32@...
      > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: 7/9/09 12:04 PM
      > Subject: [pfaf] wHERE ARE THE OWNERS OF PFAF
      >
      > iM WONDERING I read about Matricaria (pineapple weed) Matricaria
      > matricarioides growing in baseball feilds on the site.
      > Now it has disapered I don't see it, I searched with control(Ctrl) button,
      > and f (stands for find).
      > Im 99.9 percent sure I seen it on pfaf (unless I was dreaming)
      > Im serious though I have this in my memory, and MY herbal site used to only
      > be Pfaf.
      > I think it's good to list baseball field on it's page,
      > because people might over look the plant
      > not remember where they've seen it,
      > or want to Know where to look for it,
      > but Some how it has disapearred.
      >
      > I also Have another question , couls some one please email , me from the
      > site.
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
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    • Steve
      Notice how the folks at Virginia Tech classified this ancient healing herb? WEED (picture the rubber stamp slamming down on the file here, if it s more
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 14, 2009
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        Notice how the folks at Virginia Tech classified this ancient healing herb?
         
        "WEED"
         
        (picture the rubber stamp slamming down on the file here, if it's more effective for your visualization.)
         
         
        Invasion biology rears its head again..
         
        Peace,
         
        Steve.

         

        --
        "The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force."

        - Thomas Jefferson
      • Dee Harris
        Yarrow is known as warrior s wort as well as a heal all medicine plant. They have to be stupid to call it a weed. Wolf   ... From: Steve
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 15, 2009
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          Yarrow is known as warrior's wort as well as a heal all medicine plant. They have to be stupid to call it a weed.
          Wolf

           


          --- On Tue, 7/14/09, Steve <permalove@...> wrote:

          From: Steve <permalove@...>
          Subject: [pfaf] Yarrow
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 8:42 PM

          Notice how the folks at Virginia Tech classified this ancient healing herb?
           
          "WEED"
           
          (picture the rubber stamp slamming down on the file here, if it's more effective for your visualization. )
           
           
          Invasion biology rears its head again..
           
          Peace,
           
          Steve.

           

          --
          "The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force."

          - Thomas Jefferson

        • leifweaver
          Many plant identification guides have weed as a classification. It does not mean that the plant is not edible, medicinal, or useful, but it means that it is
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 16, 2009
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            Many plant identification guides have "weed" as a classification. It does not mean that the plant is not edible, medicinal, or useful, but it means that it is a ruderal that was not intentionally planted. A "weed" guide is useful for identifying plants in fields and along the edges of roads, etc. From Wikipedia's definition of weed:

            "Generally, a weed is a plant in an undesired place.

            Weeds may be unwanted for a number of reasons: they might be unsightly, or crowd out or restrict light to more desirable plants or use limited nutrients from the soil. They can harbor and spread plant pathogens that infect and degrade the quality of crop or horticultural plants. Some weeds are a nuisance because they have thorns or prickles, some have chemicals that cause skin irritation or are hazardous if eaten, or have parts that come off and attach to fur or clothes.

            The term weed in its general sense is a subjective one, without any classification value, since a "weed" is not a weed when growing where it belongs or is wanted. Indeed, a number of "weeds" have been used in gardens or other cultivated-plant settings."

          • Helena Spear
            And to think I pay through the nose for a small box of dried yarrow/weed to use as a tea for so many things! Since my garden is a wilderness in any case, I
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 16, 2009
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              And to think I pay through the nose for a small box of dried "yarrow/weed" to use as a tea for so many things! Since my garden is a wilderness in any case, I might as well start growing this one...
               
              Ciao!
              Helena


              From: Dee Harris <corbywolf13@...>
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, July 15, 2009 10:06:22 PM
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] Yarrow

               

              Yarrow is known as warrior's wort as well as a heal all medicine plant. They have to be stupid to call it a weed.
              Wolf

               


              --- On Tue, 7/14/09, Steve <permalove@gmail. com> wrote:

              From: Steve <permalove@gmail. com>
              Subject: [pfaf] Yarrow
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
              Date: Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 8:42 PM

              Notice how the folks at Virginia Tech classified this ancient healing herb?
               
              "WEED"
               
              (picture the rubber stamp slamming down on the file here, if it's more effective for your visualization. )
               
               
              Invasion biology rears its head again..
               
              Peace,
               
              Steve.

               

              --
              "The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force.."

              - Thomas Jefferson


            • david.keltie@gmail.com
              Like so many things - easily grown, better fresh and all for a little bit of effort and thought. Other teas from our garden - lemon balm, mint, camomile,
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 17, 2009
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                Like so many things - easily grown, better fresh and all for a little
                bit of effort and thought. Other 'teas' from our garden - lemon balm,
                mint, camomile, nettle, berry leaf, lemon verbena......

                Cheers, David

                On Fri, Jul 17, 2009 at 7:04 AM, Helena Spear<helena.spear@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > And to think I pay through the nose for a small box of dried "yarrow/weed"
                > to use as a tea for so many things! Since my garden is a wilderness in any
                > case, I might as well start growing this one...
                >
                > Ciao!
                > Helena
                >
              • Gail Lloyd
                One of the most notable weeds that are excellent to eat or make into tea are dandelions.  The whole plant is edible: roots, leaves, flowers....very
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 17, 2009
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                  One of the most notable "weeds" that are excellent to eat or make into tea are dandelions. 
                  The whole plant is edible: roots, leaves, flowers....very medicinal also.
                  Judy

                  --- On Thu, 7/16/09, leifweaver <leifweaver@...> wrote:

                  From: leifweaver <leifweaver@...>
                  Subject: [pfaf] Re: Yarrow
                  To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Thursday, July 16, 2009, 2:29 PM

                   
                  Many plant identification guides have "weed" as a classification. It does not mean that the plant is not edible, medicinal, or useful, but it means that it is a ruderal that was not intentionally planted. A "weed" guide is useful for identifying plants in fields and along the edges of roads, etc. From Wikipedia's definition of weed:

                  "Generally, a weed is a plant in an undesired place.
                  Weeds may be unwanted for a number of reasons: they might be unsightly, or crowd out or restrict light to more desirable plants or use limited nutrients from the soil. They can harbor and spread plant pathogens that infect and degrade the quality of crop or horticultural plants. Some weeds are a nuisance because they have thorns or prickles, some have chemicals that cause skin irritation or are hazardous if eaten, or have parts that come off and attach to fur or clothes.
                  The term weed in its general sense is a subjective one, without any classification value, since a "weed" is not a weed when growing where it belongs or is wanted. Indeed, a number of "weeds" have been used in gardens or other cultivated-plant settings."

                • nerdnooky
                  They do. It s called a flower here, as well as a weed. Perhaps we could come up with a new indentifying term for useful weeds and other plants that doesn t
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 12 3:44 PM
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                    They do. It's called a flower here, as well as a weed. Perhaps we could come up with a new indentifying term for useful "weeds" and other plants that doesn't include the word "multi-use". There's edible plants, medicinal plants, edible AND medicinal plants, fiber plants, erosion plants, the list goes on. But then again, the simple term "weed" merely connototes a negative picture. Weeds don't get their deserved due. There are few that are not useful for something.


                    --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Dee Harris <corbywolf13@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Yarrow is known as warrior's wort as well as a heal all medicine plant. They have to be stupid to call it a weed.
                    > Wolf
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- On Tue, 7/14/09, Steve <permalove@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > From: Steve <permalove@...>
                    > Subject: [pfaf] Yarrow
                    > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 8:42 PM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Notice how the folks at Virginia Tech classified this ancient healing herb?
                    >  
                    > "WEED"
                    >  
                    > (picture the rubber stamp slamming down on the file here, if it's more effective for your visualization. )
                    >  
                    > http://www.ppws vt.edu/scott/ weed_id/achmi. htm
                    >  
                    > Invasion biology rears its head again..
                    >  
                    > Peace,
                    >  
                    > Steve.
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > --
                    > "The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force."
                    >
                    > - Thomas Jefferson
                    >
                  • Infowolf1@aol.com
                    good idea! Mary Christine In a message dated 8/12/2009 5:02:34 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, nerdnooky@yahoo.com writes: They do. It s called a flower here, as
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 12 8:49 PM
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                      good idea!
                       
                      Mary Christine
                       
                      In a message dated 8/12/2009 5:02:34 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, nerdnooky@... writes:
                       

                      They do. It's called a flower here, as well as a weed. Perhaps we could come up with a new indentifying term for useful "weeds" and other plants that doesn't include the word "multi-use". There's edible plants, medicinal plants, edible AND medicinal plants, fiber plants, erosion plants, the list goes on. But then again, the simple term "weed" merely connototes a negative picture. Weeds don't get their deserved due. There are few that are not useful for something.

                      --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com, Dee Harris <corbywolf13@ ...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Yarrow is known as warrior's wort as well as a heal all medicine plant. They have to be stupid to call it a weed.
                      > Wolf
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- On Tue, 7/14/09, Steve <permalove@. ..> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > From: Steve <permalove@. ..>
                      > Subject: [pfaf] Yarrow
                      > To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
                      > Date: Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 8:42 PM
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Notice how the folks at Virginia Tech classified this ancient healing herb?
                      >  
                      > "WEED"
                      >  
                      > (picture the rubber stamp slamming down on the file here, if it's more effective for your visualization. )
                      >  
                      > http://www.ppws. vt.edu/scott/ weed_id/achmi. htm
                      >  
                      > Invasion biology rears its head again..
                      >  
                      > Peace,
                      >  
                      > Steve.
                      >
                      >  
                      >
                      > --
                      > "The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force."
                      >
                      > - Thomas Jefferson
                      >

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