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RE: Re: [pfaf] To compost or not to compost.

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  • frank_bowman@yahoo.co.uk
    Yep. After all the anything going on the soil, gets turned into soil!. The soil cack of worms and bugs in the soil. And they are animals. In fact one could
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 21 4:11 PM
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      Yep. After all the anything going on the soil, gets turned into soil!. The soil cack of worms and bugs in the soil. And they are animals. In fact one could more or less say soil is composed totally of cack. Its magic stuff, all. bug and worm cack. That makes veg. That makes us. Magic spiritual or what!
      Honour the cack, the soil!.

      david.keltie@... wrote:
      > Composting is unnecessary - just return all organic matter directly to
      > the surface of the soil.
      > David
      > On 6/21/09, Joseph A. Cleary < josepa2@sbcglobal. net > wrote:
      >> Dear David and Frank:
      >> A compost pile will need moisture and air. You use air water and
      >> vegetable matter, no animal bones or meat. Animal manure is expectable
      >> except for dog or cat. Cattle, horse, sheep and or goats even that of
      >> rabbit, and chicken but only sparingly. Chicken manure makes the pile
      >> extremely hot which can cause a fire, that's not desired.
      >> Your composted material has to be cooked till you kill any germ
      >> and bacteria.
      >> After that's been done you can take the cooled material use it
      >> on any plants with out fear that you'll cause harm to another plant.
      >> Be well Shavua Tov.
      >> Shalom, Shalom, Yosef
      >> ----- Original Message -----
      >> From: david.keltie@ gmail.com
      >> To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
      >> Sent: Friday, June 19, 2009 5:21 AM
      >> Subject: [Norton AntiSpam] Re: Soil Re: [pfaf] About wineberry-rubus
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Better still don't compost.! Return all organic matter to the soil as
      >> mulch..
      >> David
      >>
      >> On 6/18/09, matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
      >> < matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com > wrote:
      >> > Hi Frank,
      >> >
      >> > Yes, usually compost needs air, warmth, and humidity.
      >> >
      >> > If you started your compost bin in the winter, it may have been too cold
      >> for
      >> > the composting processes to get started, then the materials got
      >> compacted,
      >> > dry and airless as soil and more compost were addded on top. (There are
      >> > probably no holes in the sides of your plastic drum, to let air in ?
      >> Could
      >> > water get in to keep the humidity up ?)
      >> >
      >> > Reminds me of "Archeological" digs in landfill sites, because of the
      >> > constant temperature, lack of air and little water, deep in landfill
      >> sites,
      >> > organic materials are often preserved in perfect condition, more or less
      >> > indefinitely; 50 year old sandwiches still perfectly preserved (for
      >> > example).
      >> >
      >> > What I don't understand, with your bins, is that the bottom 2' to 2' 6"
      >> was
      >> > the top couple of feet at some time, why didn't it compost then ?
      >> >
      >> > It is a good idea to have a little live compost already at the bottom of
      >> the
      >> > bin. Don't add inert dirt on top of the compost, this will compact the
      >> > organic materials and will probably not add anything useful.
      >> >
      >> > There are different worms at different depths of soil, 8" may be too
      >> deep
      >> > for surface worms, and probably the soil under your bin is compacted,
      >> which
      >> > worms don't like.
      >> >
      >> > Compost prefers a good mix of dry, and green, vegetable materials, 2 or
      >> 3%
      >> > vegetarian, or omnivorous shit and potash or lime (alkaline material)
      >> also
      >> > helps.
      >> >
      >> > The pieces to be composted should not be too large (logs, whole apples
      >> will
      >> > compost much better as sawdust and pulp) and should be mixed to get the
      >> > bio-chemical processes working.
      >> >
      >> > Fungi are very good at decomposing organic materials and mushroom kits
      >> are
      >> > available that will help decompose your organic materials, provide
      >> edible
      >> > mushrooms and help build symbiotic soil communities to improve mineral
      >> > uptake by your plants.
      >> >
      >> > Real aerobic composting gets too hot for worms, and should get hot
      >> enough to
      >> > kill weed seeds and some soil pathogens.
      >> >
      >> > I expect there are some answers to your question here - there is good
      >> > composting information for most climates spread about the web.
      >> >
      >> > For larger gardens, 2 or 3 plastic drums with lids can make excellent
      >> > compost very quickly, put some active compost in the bin and cover with
      >> a
      >> > good mix of shredded compost materials, leave a week or so then roll the
      >> bin
      >> > around, to mix everything up ( don't fill the bin, so it becomes
      >> unmoveable)
      >> > once you get a system like this working, you can compost most garden
      >> waste
      >> > in 3 or 4 weeks - always leave some compost in the bin to start the next
      >> > batch. Cycle the bins so fresh material goes in one bin while another is
      >> > sitting around composting..
      >> >
      >> > Matt
      >> >
      >> > ----- Original Message -----
      >> > From: frank_bowman@ yahoo.co. uk
      >> > To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
      >> > Sent: 6/18/09 1:14 PM
      >> > Subject: Soil Re: [pfaf] About wineberry-rubus
      >> >
      >> > Hello,
      >> >
      >> > This is a lazy question, and I am using this knowledgeable group to find
      >> it
      >> > out if anyone knows. It may be perfectly obvious and simple.but I was
      >> > reminded by this last email about soil.
      >> >
      >> > Two weeks ago, I saw and discovered in one of my compost bins which is a
      >> 2
      >> > ft wide by 4 ft high plastic 45 gal drum, hasnt composted much below
      >> about
      >> > 1.5 to 2 ft. The stuff on top is great well broken down into rich
      >> compost,
      >> > but below that level, its taking its time, going very slowwwwwwwwww, and
      >> > will take a lot longer.
      >> >
      >> > The way I do this compost is just as if the waste was put in the ground,
      >> the
      >> > way compost does what it does naturally. the bottom of the drum has
      >> holes
      >> > in it to let any worms in, and the drum is buried about 6-8", so it is
      >> > connected into the ground. Every time I put kitchen waste in, I put a
      >> > covering of soil on top, and so it goes till it reaches the top, then a
      >> few
      >> > months later, quite soon, its all turned to compost, except as the penny
      >> > dropped (Ive been doing it for quite a few years, I'm a bit slow) not
      >> very
      >> > fast if at all below 1.5 - 2 ft.
      >> >
      >> > Someone suggested what I think is correct, that there is too little
      >> oxygen
      >> > at that depth, and as the soil is living, the bugs and microbes, and
      >> worms
      >> > just dont go there.
      >> >
      >> > That made me think. Mm, I wonder if that is the case with all soil. That
      >> > the covering of the living material, the soil of life, is only 1.5 to 2
      >> ft
      >> > deep or a bit more, all over the earth.
      >> >
      >> > If it is, going from the email below, the concern about living soil
      >> loss,
      >> > may not be as bad as we may believe it to be, as the depth that is
      >> needed
      >> > can be quicker renewed given that supplies of water, are needed to bring
      >> > life into it. If supplies and using swales etc, are available in areas
      >> > where there has been a lot of soil loss.
      >> >
      >> > Just a question and a thought. Frank
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > ----- Original Message -----
      >> > From: matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
      >> > To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
      >> > Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2009 5:14 PM
      >> > Subject: Re: [pfaf] About wineberry-rubus
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
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