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Re: [pfaf] Mystery vine

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  • Jennifer Pittet
    I haven t found anything about edibility. Yuko....the woman who sent me the tubers... didn t know either. Jennifer ... [Non-text portions of this message have
    Message 1 of 6 , May 9 12:51 PM
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      I haven't found anything about edibility. Yuko....the woman who sent me the
      tubers... didn't know either.

      Jennifer

      On Sat, May 9, 2009 at 2:58 PM, <Infowolf1@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > edibility?
      >
      > Mary Christine
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 5/9/2009 7:30:26 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
      > jennyp27@... <jennyp27%40gmail.com> writes:
      >
      > Thanks Matt and Geir. Looks like I didn't have the correct name of the
      > genus. I only have the tuber so far....so I haven't seen the actual vine
      > yet.
      >
      > On Sat, May 9, 2009 at 9:05 AM, Geir Flatab� <geirf@...<geirf%40ulvik.org>>
      > wrote:
      >
      > > Never heard about it before,
      > > but it is rather
      > > Thladiantha oliveri, - a cucurbitaceous ....
      > >
      > > Geir Flatab�
      > >
      > > 2009/5/9 jenniferpittet <jenniferpittet@...<jenniferpittet%40yahoo.com>
      > >
      > >
      > > > Hi pfaf people
      > > >
      > > > I received a vine from Yuko's Open Pollinated Seeds near Ottawa,
      > Ontario.
      > > > She calls it the 'mystery vine' and I haven't been able to find
      > anything
      > > > about it except the info in her seed catalogue which reads:
      > > >
      > > > Thladian oliveri. Grown from a potato-like tuber. Bell-shaped yellow
      > > flower
      > > > with heart-shaped light green leaves, climbing up until the killer
      > frost.
      > > > Comes up every spring. Grows well in a pot indoors, or outdoors. Hardy
      > is
      > > > her last name. This plant was found in Hebei, China by Westner and
      > > > introduced to the New York Botanical Garden, 1885�1888. The Chinese
      > > > categorize as ko, meaning non-Chinese. Ko means northern barbarian,
      > thus
      > > I
      > > > believe it may be been introduced by caravans on the Silk Road.
      > Imagine,
      > > > tucked in among the spices, this humble tuber on a weary camel,
      > > approaching
      > > > the famed Khyber Pass on its way to Xian
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Has anyone heard of this plant....Thladian oliveri?
      > > >
      > > > Thanks.
      > > >
      > > > Jennifer
      > > > Meaford, Ontario
      > > > Canada
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
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      >
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