Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re:Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus hypochondriacus

Expand Messages
  • Mat Coward
    I too grew grain amaranth in the UK last year - and was very pleased with it. I ll definitely do it again this year. Very attractive and interesting plants,
    Message 1 of 30 , Mar 31, 2009
      I too grew grain amaranth in the UK last year - and was very pleased with it. I'll definitely do it again this year. Very attractive and interesting plants, and in an awful year of weather, a decent crop at the end. Fair bit of work in getting the grain, but not difficult. Once it's thoroughly dried, I just kept it in a jar in the kitchen, and every time I was cooking rice, I just threw in a handful and cooked it along with the rice. Really worth a try.
      - Mat
      www.matcoward.com

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Sara Elbrai
      Of course it s a grain. A plant can be an herb and produce a grain. Sara
      Message 2 of 30 , Apr 1, 2009
        Of course it's a grain. A plant can be an herb and produce a grain.

        Sara

        --- On Tue, 3/31/09, Gail Lloyd <gardenchick1949@...> wrote:

        > From: Gail Lloyd <gardenchick1949@...>
        > Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus hypochondriacus
        > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 10:53 AM
        >      Amaranth is an ancient Aztec
        > high protein, high fiber, nutrient rich seed.  It has a
        > high concentration of lysine and a sticky texture.  It is
        > actually an herb (not a grain). 
        >      Boil 1 c grains in 2-1/2 c broth or water, for
        > 20-25 minutes, to make 2-1/2 cups cooked "grain" for a
        > sidedish.  If overcooked, you can add dried fruit, nuts,
        > and a sweetener and bake at 350 degrees F. for 20 minutes -
        > to make a cake-like dessert. 
        >      For more recipes, go to google.com and type in
        > "amaranth recipes".
        > Gail
        >
        >
        > --- On Mon, 3/30/09, jenniferpittet <jenniferpittet@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        >
        > From: jenniferpittet <jenniferpittet@...>
        > Subject: [pfaf] Re: Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus
        > hypochondriacus
        > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 3:30 PM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Luc,
        >
        > How do you use the grains....do you just boil them up and
        > eat them like millet or something? I've heard the grains are
        > very very small. Is it labour intensive to process them?
        >
        > I've heard they should grow here...they were actually
        > recommended to me as a perennial vegetable.
        >
        > Jennifer
        >
        > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com, luc vleeracker
        > <lucvleeracker@ ...> wrote:
        > >
        > > I am ,  but in Mexico....very fast growing from seed
        > , leaves are also edible..may work in your summertime..
        > >  
        > > Luc
        > >
        > > --- On Mon, 3/30/09, jenniferpittet
        > <jenniferpittet@ ...> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > From: jenniferpittet <jenniferpittet@ ...>
        > > Subject: [pfaf] Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus
        > hypochondriacus
        > > To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
        > > Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 12:26 PM
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Has anybody had experience growing grain amaranth
        > > (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) ? Is it useful as a food
        > grain? I'd like to give it a try in Central Ontario. Below
        > is the information from Richter's Seed catalogue.
        > >
        > > Thanks for your help.
        > >
        > > Jennifer
        > >
        > >
        > > Ancient Aztec food grain. Protein content is higher
        > than that of wheat, rice, and corn. High in the essential
        > amino acid, lysine, which is generally low in other grains.
        > Delicious cooked as a hot cereal or popped like popcorn. Can
        > be milled into flour. Its vibrant burgundy colour is ideal
        > for edible landscaping
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >      
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >     mailto:pfaf-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
      • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
        There are many edible Amaranthus species, some are much better known as leaf vegetables and have seeds that are not usually eaten, some contain gluten in the
        Message 3 of 30 , Apr 1, 2009
          There are many edible Amaranthus species, some are much better known as leaf vegetables and have seeds that are not usually eaten, some contain gluten in the edible seeds, other's seeds are gluten free.
          Amaranthus is one of the great underused genera, some species can produce a lot of leaf quickly and huge amounts of seed not long after.

          Matt

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: selbrai@...
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: 4/2/09 2:11 AM
          Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus hypochondriacus

          Of course it's a grain. A plant can be an herb and produce a grain.

          Sara

          --- On Tue, 3/31/09, Gail Lloyd wrote:

          > From: Gail Lloyd
          > Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus hypochondriacus
          > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 10:53 AM
          > ���� Amaranth is an ancient Aztec
          > high protein, high fiber, nutrient rich seed.� It has a
          > high concentration of lysine and a sticky texture.� It is
          > actually an herb (not a grain).�
          > ���� Boil 1 c grains in 2-1/2 c broth or water, for
          > 20-25 minutes, to make 2-1/2 cups cooked "grain" for a
          > sidedish.� If overcooked, you can add dried fruit, nuts,
          > and a sweetener and bake at 350 degrees F. for 20 minutes -
          > to make a cake-like dessert.�
          > ���� For more recipes, go to google.com and type in
          > "amaranth recipes".
          > Gail
          >
          >
          > --- On Mon, 3/30/09, jenniferpittet
          > wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: jenniferpittet
          > Subject: [pfaf] Re: Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus
          > hypochondriacus
          > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 3:30 PM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi Luc,
          >
          > How do you use the grains....do you just boil them up and
          > eat them like millet or something? I've heard the grains are
          > very very small. Is it labour intensive to process them?
          >
          > I've heard they should grow here...they were actually
          > recommended to me as a perennial vegetable.
          >
          > Jennifer
          >
          > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com, luc vleeracker
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > I am , �but in Mexico....very fast growing from seed
          > , leaves are also edible..may work in your summertime..
          > > �
          > > Luc
          > >
          > > --- On Mon, 3/30/09, jenniferpittet
          > wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > From: jenniferpittet
          > > Subject: [pfaf] Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus
          > hypochondriacus
          > > To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
          > > Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 12:26 PM
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Has anybody had experience growing grain amaranth
          > > (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) ? Is it useful as a food
          > grain? I'd like to give it a try in Central Ontario. Below
          > is the information from Richter's Seed catalogue.
          > >
          > > Thanks for your help.
          > >
          > > Jennifer
          > >
          > >
          > > Ancient Aztec food grain. Protein content is higher
          > than that of wheat, rice, and corn. High in the essential
          > amino acid, lysine, which is generally low in other grains.
          > Delicious cooked as a hot cereal or popped like popcorn. Can
          > be milled into flour. Its vibrant burgundy colour is ideal
          > for edible landscaping
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > � � �
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          > � � mailto:pfaf-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >





          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/

          Your email settings:
          Individual Email | Traditional

          To change settings online go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/join
          (Yahoo! ID required)

          To change settings via email:
          mailto:pfaf-digest@yahoogroups.com
          mailto:pfaf-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Gail Lloyd
          Technically, a grain is from grass plants & seeds are from herbal plants (sources below), but scientists and botanists can and do change their minds a lot
          Message 4 of 30 , Apr 2, 2009
            Technically, a grain is from grass plants & seeds are from herbal plants (sources below), but scientists and botanists can and do change their minds a lot (e.g., scientific "theories", and the often renaming of botanical names and plant families).  Having said that, it really doesn't matter... just trivial info and the important thing is that they're good to eat.
            Gail
            seed (sēd)
            1. the mature ovule of a flowering plant.
            grain (gr n)
            n.
            1. A small, dry, one-seeded fruit of a cereal grass, having the fruit and the seed walls united.
             
            http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/seed+grain
            Amaranthus, collectively known as amaranth or pigweed, is a cosmopolitan genus of herbs.
            Amaranth seeds are tan or light brown in color and are about the size of poppy seeds. Not a true cereal grain, Amaranth is sometimes called a ‘pseudo-grain’ and has been referred to as a herb or even a vegetable.
            http://waltonfeed.com/old/self/amaranth.html
             


            --- On Wed, 4/1/09, Sara Elbrai <selbrai@...> wrote:


            From: Sara Elbrai <selbrai@...>
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus hypochondriacus
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 9:19 PM







            Of course it's a grain. A plant can be an herb and produce a grain.

            Sara

            --- On Tue, 3/31/09, Gail Lloyd <gardenchick1949@ yahoo.com> wrote:

            > From: Gail Lloyd <gardenchick1949@ yahoo.com>
            > Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus hypochondriacus
            > To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
            > Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 10:53 AM
            >      Amaranth is an ancient Aztec
            > high protein, high fiber, nutrient rich seed.  It has a
            > high concentration of lysine and a sticky texture.  It is
            > actually an herb (not a grain). 
            >      Boil 1 c grains in 2-1/2 c broth or water, for
            > 20-25 minutes, to make 2-1/2 cups cooked "grain" for a
            > sidedish.  If overcooked, you can add dried fruit, nuts,
            > and a sweetener and bake at 350 degrees F. for 20 minutes -
            > to make a cake-like dessert. 
            >      For more recipes, go to google.com and type in
            > "amaranth recipes".
            > Gail
            >
            >
            > --- On Mon, 3/30/09, jenniferpittet <jenniferpittet@ yahoo.com>
            > wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: jenniferpittet <jenniferpittet@ yahoo.com>
            > Subject: [pfaf] Re: Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus
            > hypochondriacus
            > To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
            > Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 3:30 PM
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi Luc,
            >
            > How do you use the grains....do you just boil them up and
            > eat them like millet or something? I've heard the grains are
            > very very small. Is it labour intensive to process them?
            >
            > I've heard they should grow here...they were actually
            > recommended to me as a perennial vegetable.
            >
            > Jennifer
            >
            > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com, luc vleeracker
            > <lucvleeracker@ ...> wrote:
            > >
            > > I am ,  but in Mexico....very fast growing from seed
            > , leaves are also edible..may work in your summertime..
            > >  
            > > Luc
            > >
            > > --- On Mon, 3/30/09, jenniferpittet
            > <jenniferpittet@ ...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > From: jenniferpittet <jenniferpittet@ ...>
            > > Subject: [pfaf] Grain amaranth ---- Amaranthus
            > hypochondriacus
            > > To: pfaf@yahoogroups. com
            > > Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 12:26 PM
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Has anybody had experience growing grain amaranth
            > > (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) ? Is it useful as a food
            > grain? I'd like to give it a try in Central Ontario. Below
            > is the information from Richter's Seed catalogue.
            > >
            > > Thanks for your help.
            > >
            > > Jennifer
            > >
            > >
            > > Ancient Aztec food grain. Protein content is higher
            > than that of wheat, rice, and corn. High in the essential
            > amino acid, lysine, which is generally low in other grains.
            > Delicious cooked as a hot cereal or popped like popcorn. Can
            > be milled into flour. Its vibrant burgundy colour is ideal
            > for edible landscaping
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >      
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------ --------- --------- ------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >     mailto:pfaf-fullfeatured@ yahoogroups. com
            >
            >
            >



















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Carles Esquerda
            Hi Griselda,   As far as I know, seeds need some light to germinate, so do not bury them much. Moisture is also needed until they germinate. But I have read
            Message 5 of 30 , Apr 24, 2009
              Hi Griselda,
               
              As far as I know, seeds need some light to germinate, so do not bury them much. Moisture is also needed until they germinate. But I have read that germinating power is quickly lost after seeds mature in the fruit.
               
              We multiply Stevia by cuttings, it is faster.
               
              Regards,
               
              Carles Esquerda
              Lleida, Spain

              --- El mar, 31/3/09, Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...> escribió:


              De: Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...>
              Asunto: [pfaf] Stevia
              Para: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Fecha: martes, 31 marzo, 2009 9:30






              I have some Stevia seed which is tiny and I understand it has a low
              germination rate.
              Does anyone have any tips on how I should proceed for maximum results?
              I have just a sunny windowsill for my seeds to grow, no advanced
              equipment.
              Thanks
              Griselda



















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
              Viable Stevia seeds are black, unfertilized seed is tan coloured and weighs less. The seeds germinate well at a wide range of temperatures, fresh viable seed
              Message 6 of 30 , Apr 24, 2009
                Viable Stevia seeds are black, unfertilized seed is tan coloured and weighs less.
                The seeds germinate well at a wide range of temperatures, fresh viable seed will germinate in a couple of weeks at 70 to 100% with temperatures from 15°C to 40°C and light, germination is 50 to 60% without light.
                Most viable seeds will germinate in 5 days at 25°C.
                About 7% of tan seed will germinate, with or without light, in the same temperature range.
                Prefers infertile, sandy acid soils, with a high water table.

                Stevia seed starting by Jeffrey Goettemoeller:
                http://prairieoakpublishing.com/index.php?pr=Seed_Starting

                Matt

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: cesquerda@...
                To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: 4/24/09 9:48 AM
                Subject: Re: [pfaf] Stevia

                Hi Griselda,
                �
                As far as I know, seeds need some�light to germinate, so do not bury them much. Moisture is also needed until they germinate. But I have read that germinating power is quickly lost after seeds mature in the fruit.
                �
                We multiply Stevia by cuttings, it is faster.
                �
                Regards,
                �
                Carles Esquerda
                Lleida, Spain

                --- El mar, 31/3/09, Griselda Mussett escribi�:


                De: Griselda Mussett
                Asunto: [pfaf] Stevia
                Para: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                Fecha: martes, 31 marzo, 2009 9:30






                I have some Stevia seed which is tiny and I understand it has a low
                germination rate.
                Does anyone have any tips on how I should proceed for maximum results?
                I have just a sunny windowsill for my seeds to grow, no advanced
                equipment.
                Thanks
                Griselda



















                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                ------------------------------------

                Yahoo! Groups Links

                To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/

                Your email settings:
                Individual Email | Traditional

                To change settings online go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/join
                (Yahoo! ID required)

                To change settings via email:
                mailto:pfaf-digest@yahoogroups.com
                mailto:pfaf-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

                To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
                If you can find a source for good quality plants, Stevia is usually (and much more easily) propagated from cuttings. Seed viability is usually very low (look
                Message 7 of 30 , Oct 15, 2009
                  If you can find a source for good quality plants, Stevia is usually (and much more easily) propagated from cuttings.

                  Seed viability is usually very low (look for the fatter darker seeds) and germination of viable seed is not always consistent, even with excellent conditions.

                  Matt

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: baba_alisha2003@...
                  To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: 10/15/09 4:25 PM
                  Subject: [pfaf] uk herb production

                  hi again. it's been a while since i was here, previously looking advice about growing stevia in the uk. as it happened i never managed to get a single seed to germinate though they were supposed to be fresh seeds and i followed the instructions they came with aS best i could with the light we have here...

                  .... i am still looking at ideas for growing herbs here in south west england, as i have access to land at a couple of organice farms...

                  .... just in the process of rebooting the planning and researching processes for next spring...

                  .... so am here opening the doors to any inspiration or advice pfaf members might wish to share with me as to what herbs would be easy and profitable to grow in this climate.

                  .... the soil at one farm is largely very clay rich... i'm yet to visit and see the others...

                  .... many thanks for all replies in the meantime...

                  raspex...

                  hugo



                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links

                  To visit your group on the web, go to:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/

                  Your email settings:
                  Individual Email | Traditional

                  To change settings online go to:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/join
                  (Yahoo! ID required)

                  To change settings via email:
                  mailto:pfaf-digest@yahoogroups.com
                  mailto:pfaf-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                  http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                • Carles Esquerda
                  Yes you re right, Stevia is more easily propagated by cuttings. Here in inland northern Spain we grow Stevia in greenhouses and propagation is easy
                  Message 8 of 30 , Oct 16, 2009
                    Yes you're right, Stevia is more easily propagated by cuttings. Here in inland northern Spain we grow Stevia in greenhouses and propagation is easy from cuttings and also from root suckers. Regarding soil requirements, Stevia does not grow well in clayey or hard soils, it prefers light soils. We are doing trials outdoors to see if they survive winter colds with the help of some type of cover. I guess that in south west England if you are close to the sea temperatures in winter should not be too low for the plant.
                     
                    Cheers,
                     
                    Carles


                    De: "matthew@..." <matthew@...>
                    Para: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                    Enviado: vie,16 octubre, 2009 02:31
                    Asunto: [pfaf] Stevia

                    If you can find a source for good quality plants, Stevia is usually (and much more easily) propagated from cuttings.

                    Seed viability is usually very low (look for the fatter darker seeds) and germination of viable seed is not always consistent, even with excellent conditions.

                    Matt

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: baba_alisha2003@...
                    To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: 10/15/09 4:25 PM
                    Subject: [pfaf] uk herb production

                      hi again. it's been a while since i was here, previously looking advice about growing stevia in the uk. as it happened i never managed to get a single seed to germinate though they were supposed to be fresh seeds and i followed the instructions they came with aS  best i could with the light we have here...

                    ....  i am still looking at ideas for growing herbs here in south west england, as i have access to land at a couple of organice farms...

                    .... just in the process of rebooting the planning and researching processes for next spring...

                    ....  so am here opening the doors to any inspiration or advice pfaf members might wish to share with me as to what herbs would be easy and profitable to grow in this climate.

                    .... the soil at one farm is largely very clay rich... i'm yet to visit and see the others...

                    .... many thanks for all replies in the meantime...

                    raspex...

                    hugo



                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links

                    To visit your group on the web, go to:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/

                    Your email settings:
                        Individual Email | Traditional

                    To change settings online go to:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/join
                        (Yahoo! ID required)

                    To change settings via email:
                        mailto:pfaf-digest@yahoogroups.com
                        mailto:pfaf-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                        http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/





                  • Laury Carter
                    Hello, Stevia germination is generally low, but I found a supplier this past year who has turned that around. I ordered 100 stevia seeds from www.seedman.com
                    Message 9 of 30 , Oct 16, 2009
                      Hello,

                      Stevia germination is generally low, but I found a supplier this past year
                      who has turned that around.
                      I ordered 100 stevia seeds from www.seedman.com and my germination was 105%.
                      In my east livingroom window.

                      They have successfully done a great deal of scientific work to improve their
                      germination. There is an explanation on their website. Even though the
                      southern U.S. is a long way to go for seeds in the UK, the germination rate
                      would probably justify the extra shipping costs.

                      They also offer inexpensive books with growing tips and recipes.

                      Laury
                    • Sheila
                      puzzled...100 seeds? max germination you could get would be 100% so where did the other 5 come from...even if you got extra seeds and they all germinated you
                      Message 10 of 30 , Oct 17, 2009
                        puzzled...100 seeds? max germination you could get would be 100% so where did the other 5 come from...even if you got extra seeds and they all germinated you could still only get 100% :-)
                        Sheila

                        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Laury Carter" <claury@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hello,
                        >
                        > Stevia germination is generally low, but I found a supplier this past year
                        > who has turned that around.
                        > I ordered 100 stevia seeds from www.seedman.com and my germination was 105%.
                        > In my east livingroom window.
                        >
                        > They have successfully done a great deal of scientific work to improve their
                        > germination. There is an explanation on their website. Even though the
                        > southern U.S. is a long way to go for seeds in the UK, the germination rate
                        > would probably justify the extra shipping costs.
                        >
                        > They also offer inexpensive books with growing tips and recipes.
                        >
                        > Laury
                        >
                      • BrendasOrganics@aol.com
                        It must be new math! ... From: Sheila To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sat, Oct 17, 2009 11:10 am Subject: [pfaf] Re:Stevia puzzled...100
                        Message 11 of 30 , Oct 17, 2009
                          It must be new math!


                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Sheila <srjot1@...>
                          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sat, Oct 17, 2009 11:10 am
                          Subject: [pfaf] Re:Stevia

                           
                          puzzled...100 seeds? max germination you could get would be 100% so where did the other 5 come from...even if you got extra seeds and they all germinated you could still only get 100% :-)
                          Sheila

                          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com, "Laury Carter" <claury@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hello,
                          >
                          > Stevia germination is generally low, but I found a supplier this past year
                          > who has turned that around.
                          > I ordered 100 stevia seeds from www.seedman. com and my germination was 105%.
                          > In my east livingroom window.
                          >
                          > They have successfully done a great deal of scientific work to improve their
                          > germination. There is an explanation on their website. Even though the
                          > southern U.S. is a long way to go for seeds in the UK, the germination rate
                          > would probably justify the extra shipping costs.
                          >
                          > They also offer inexpensive books with growing tips and recipes.
                          >
                          > Laury
                          >

                        • Laury Carter
                          yes.ha ha they did send extra seeds, I paid for 100 seeds, but did not count the seeds, only the viable plants... would that be called metaphoric math? ;o)
                          Message 12 of 30 , Oct 18, 2009
                            yes.ha ha
                            they did send extra seeds, I paid for 100 seeds, but did not count the
                            seeds, only the viable plants...
                            would that be called metaphoric math?
                            ;o)
                            Laury
                          • nerdnooky
                            Best way to germinate tropicals is by poly bag on top the fridge. This never lets me down. Stevia doesn t need light until germination, but it does need
                            Message 13 of 30 , Oct 20, 2009
                              Best way to germinate tropicals is by poly bag on top the fridge. This never lets me down. Stevia doesn't need light until germination, but it does need warmth.

                              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, matthew@... wrote:
                              >
                              > If you can find a source for good quality plants, Stevia is usually (and much more easily) propagated from cuttings.
                              >
                              > Seed viability is usually very low (look for the fatter darker seeds) and germination of viable seed is not always consistent, even with excellent conditions.
                              >
                              > Matt
                              >
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > From: baba_alisha2003@...
                              > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: 10/15/09 4:25 PM
                              > Subject: [pfaf] uk herb production
                              >
                              > hi again. it's been a while since i was here, previously looking advice about growing stevia in the uk. as it happened i never managed to get a single seed to germinate though they were supposed to be fresh seeds and i followed the instructions they came with aS best i could with the light we have here...
                              >
                              > .... i am still looking at ideas for growing herbs here in south west england, as i have access to land at a couple of organice farms...
                              >
                              > .... just in the process of rebooting the planning and researching processes for next spring...
                              >
                              > .... so am here opening the doors to any inspiration or advice pfaf members might wish to share with me as to what herbs would be easy and profitable to grow in this climate.
                              >
                              > .... the soil at one farm is largely very clay rich... i'm yet to visit and see the others...
                              >
                              > .... many thanks for all replies in the meantime...
                              >
                              > raspex...
                              >
                              > hugo
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ------------------------------------
                              >
                              > Yahoo! Groups Links
                              >
                              > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/
                              >
                              > Your email settings:
                              > Individual Email | Traditional
                              >
                              > To change settings online go to:
                              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/join
                              > (Yahoo! ID required)
                              >
                              > To change settings via email:
                              > mailto:pfaf-digest@yahoogroups.com
                              > mailto:pfaf-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
                              >
                              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                              > pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                              >
                              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                              >
                            • Geir Flatabø
                              I have just harvested some Stevia, for winter use I have dried it in a dehydrator, and will keep it in a airtight jar.. Anyone ave suggestions for use /
                              Message 14 of 30 , Oct 12, 2016
                                I have just harvested some Stevia, 
                                for winter use I have dried it in a dehydrator,  and will keep it in a airtight jar..

                                Anyone ave suggestions for use / application of dried Stevia ?

                                Geir Flatabø
                              • Javier Cosp Fontclara
                                Stevia is originally from my country (Paraguay). We call it kaa hee ( sweet plant in guaraní language). You can use it to make tea or mix with another kind
                                Message 15 of 30 , Oct 12, 2016


                                  Stevia is originally from my country (Paraguay). We call it "kaa hee" ("sweet plant" in guaraní language).


                                  You can use it to make tea or mix with another kind of tea to make it sweet. (instead of sugar).


                                  Javier Cosp


                                  De: pfaf@yahoogroups.com <pfaf@yahoogroups.com> en nombre de Geir Flatabø geirf@... [pfaf] <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Enviado: miércoles, 12 de octubre de 2016 09:57:32 a.m.
                                  Para: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                  Asunto: [pfaf] Stevia
                                   
                                   

                                  I have just harvested some Stevia, 
                                  for winter use I have dried it in a dehydrator,  and will keep it in a airtight jar..

                                  Anyone ave suggestions for use / application of dried Stevia ?

                                  Geir Flatabø

                                • manofpeace32
                                  What is your opinion of it? Some sweeteners (maybe artificial) can trick your brain thinking you ve had sugar , and sends signals from the brain to release
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Oct 12, 2016
                                    What is your opinion of it? Some sweeteners (maybe artificial) can trick your brain thinking you've had sugar , and sends signals from the brain to release insulin , building to diabetes over long term us.

                                    (I saw it about other types of sweeteners !!!
                                     so I am not trying to scare anyone 
                                    Just am Asking if there are any bad effects using in large doses 
                                    or over a period of time .

                                    (I sold a bunch for cheap I also learned after selling it Agave (sugar what's makes  Tequlia ) is easier to handle if people have problems with sugar
                                    or diabetes.
                                  • Javier Cosp Fontclara
                                    I dont like the taste, so I dont use it very much, but it is suppose to be the healthiest sweetener. Javier ________________________________ De:
                                    Message 17 of 30 , Oct 12, 2016


                                      I dont like the taste, so I dont use it very much, but it is suppose to be the healthiest sweetener.


                                      Javier


                                      De: pfaf@yahoogroups.com <pfaf@yahoogroups.com> en nombre de manofpeace32@... [pfaf] <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
                                      Enviado: miércoles, 12 de octubre de 2016 12:21:19 p.m.
                                      Para: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                      Asunto: Re: [pfaf] Stevia
                                       
                                       

                                      What is your opinion of it? Some sweeteners (maybe artificial) can trick your brain thinking you've had sugar , and sends signals from the brain to release insulin , building to diabetes over long term us.


                                      (I saw it about other types of sweeteners !!!
                                       so I am not trying to scare anyone 
                                      Just am Asking if there are any bad effects using in large doses 
                                      or over a period of time .

                                      (I sold a bunch for cheap I also learned after selling it Agave (sugar what's makes  Tequlia ) is easier to handle if people have problems with sugar
                                      or diabetes.

                                    • nova wright
                                      Every make of it taste different nova From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 12:57 PM To:
                                      Message 18 of 30 , Oct 12, 2016

                                        Every make of it taste different

                                         

                                        nova

                                         

                                        From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com]
                                        Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 12:57 PM
                                        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: Re: [pfaf] Stevia

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                        I dont like the taste, so I dont use it very much, but it is suppose to be the healthiest sweetener.

                                         

                                        Javier


                                        De: pfaf@yahoogroups.com <pfaf@yahoogroups.com> en nombre de manofpeace32@... [pfaf] <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Enviado: miércoles, 12 de octubre de 2016 12:21:19 p.m.
                                        Para: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                        Asunto: Re: [pfaf] Stevia

                                         

                                         

                                        What is your opinion of it? Some sweeteners (maybe artificial) can trick your brain thinking you've had sugar , and sends signals from the brain to release insulin , building to diabetes over long term us.



                                        (I saw it about other types of sweeteners !!!

                                         so I am not trying to scare anyone 

                                        Just am Asking if there are any bad effects using in large doses 

                                        or over a period of time .



                                        (I sold a bunch for cheap I also learned after selling it Agave (sugar what's makes  Tequlia ) is easier to handle if people have problems with sugar

                                        or diabetes.

                                      • frank@frankwoolf.com
                                        Stevia is 100% safe unlike sugar, Aspartame, etc. Frank
                                        Message 19 of 30 , Oct 12, 2016
                                          Stevia is 100% safe unlike sugar, Aspartame, etc.



                                          Frank



                                          On 12 Oct 2016, at 11:21 PM, manofpeace32@... [pfaf] <pfaf@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                          What is your opinion of it? Some sweeteners (maybe artificial) can trick your brain thinking you've had sugar , and sends signals from the brain to release insulin , building to diabetes over long term us.


                                          (I saw it about other types of sweeteners !!!
                                           so I am not trying to scare anyone 
                                          Just am Asking if there are any bad effects using in large doses 
                                          or over a period of time .

                                          (I sold a bunch for cheap I also learned after selling it Agave (sugar what's makes  Tequlia ) is easier to handle if people have problems with sugar
                                          or diabetes.


                                        • kali dasan
                                          Hi please. Thank you very much your mail. Am grower and supplier of exotic vegetables and herbs. Can you possible some sample stiva please. Best regards
                                          Message 20 of 30 , Oct 12, 2016
                                            Hi please.
                                            Thank you very much your mail. Am grower and supplier of exotic
                                            vegetables and herbs. Can you possible some sample stiva please.
                                            Best regards
                                            kalidasan


                                            On 10/13/16, 'frank@...' frank@... [pfaf]
                                            <pfaf@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                                            > Stevia is 100% safe unlike sugar, Aspartame, etc.
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Frank
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >> On 12 Oct 2016, at 11:21 PM, manofpeace32@... [pfaf]
                                            >> <pfaf@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                                            >>
                                            >> What is your opinion of it? Some sweeteners (maybe artificial) can trick
                                            >> your brain thinking you've had sugar , and sends signals from the brain to
                                            >> release insulin , building to diabetes over long term us.
                                            >>
                                            >>
                                            >> (I saw it about other types of sweeteners !!!
                                            >> so I am not trying to scare anyone
                                            >> Just am Asking if there are any bad effects using in large doses
                                            >> or over a period of time .
                                            >>
                                            >> (I sold a bunch for cheap I also learned after selling it Agave (sugar
                                            >> what's makes Tequlia ) is easier to handle if people have problems with
                                            >> sugar
                                            >> or diabetes.
                                            >>
                                            >>
                                            >
                                            >
                                          • manofpeace32
                                            Well I can t argue if you grow it yourself if you look into commercial stevia some of the brands are not good Some deceptive labeling. read up on (google)
                                            Message 21 of 30 , Oct 13, 2016
                                              Well I can't argue if you grow it yourself 
                                              if you look into commercial stevia some of the brands are not good
                                              Some deceptive labeling.
                                               read up on (google) those brands you buy at least.

                                              Unrelated , to stevia , but about labeling 
                                              Even Birch Sugar Xylitol can be mass produced from GM corn.
                                              and mention how it's a sugar that comes from birch tree's
                                              (that's half true their sugar isn't from Birch)
                                            • Annalisa Balestrino
                                              I grow it on my porch, I tried to use it in leaves, broken down into small bits, on my daughter s not so sweet strawberries but it did not work well as
                                              Message 22 of 30 , Oct 13, 2016

                                                I grow it on my porch, I tried to use it in leaves, broken down into small bits, on my daughter's not so sweet strawberries but it did not work well as sweetener. I will try to prepare a tea as suggested by the South American contributor. It must work better. My daughter eats a leaf (fresh or dried) as  a candy sometimes.


                                                Il 13/ott/2016 12:17, "manofpeace32@... [pfaf]" <pfaf@yahoogroups.com> ha scritto:
                                                 

                                                Well I can't argue if you grow it yourself 

                                                if you look into commercial stevia some of the brands are not good
                                                Some deceptive labeling.
                                                 read up on (google) those brands you buy at least.

                                                Unrelated , to stevia , but about labeling 
                                                Even Birch Sugar Xylitol can be mass produced from GM corn.
                                                and mention how it's a sugar that comes from birch tree's
                                                (that's half true their sugar isn't from Birch)
                                              • manofpeace32
                                                jenniferpittet I wonder If yuor related on My Moms side (Moors) In Anyway I think you will be fine getting a harvest Some Herbal store people just threw some
                                                Message 23 of 30 , Oct 18, 2016
                                                  jenniferpittet I wonder If yuor related on My Moms side (Moors) In Anyway 
                                                  I think you will be fine getting a harvest Some Herbal store people just threw some on the ground, and covered with straw to suppress the weeds with their Tomatoes No work, Near (Chiago(land)  (and  the dreary UK member here)I harvested some Early Just ate it Whole In my eggs (I was On a bike ride) --(and also ate the entire seed top)

                                                  I know if I grow some (a completely different type of plants) Now in October
                                                  They might grow big at the end of this season to force the plant to flower
                                                  I think for that (different) species the days getting Shorter 
                                                  it would force it to go to seed as well 
                                                  (but at least started at the beginning of your season)

                                                  (if you get the Pig weed type that may become invasive
                                                  I may post some experimenting cooking with that ... Chickens would like it) 
                                                  I also like the Amaranth that the leaves are sour as a (snack) Vegetable.. 
                                                • manofpeace32
                                                  Anyone seen the cultivar Amaranth tricolor known as tampala, tandaljo or tandalja bhaji in India Amaranthus tricolor - Wikipedia
                                                  Message 24 of 30 , Oct 19, 2016
                                                    Anyone seen the cultivar Amaranth tricolor known as tampalatandaljo or tandalja  bhaji in India
                                                    Amaranthus tricolor - Wikipedia

                                                     



                                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.