Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Foxes

Expand Messages
  • richardandmarina@aol.com
    Sorry if this seems an odd post but wondered if anyone had any effective ways to deter foxes from marking their territory on garden produce. Most people won t
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 17, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Sorry if this seems an odd post but wondered if anyone had any effective
      ways to deter foxes from marking their territory on garden produce.

      Most people won't know what fox urine smells like but once identified never
      forgotten! You see, once we had milk delivered on our doorstep and Mr fox
      graced it with his 'gift'. Unbeknown to me, I picked it up and put it in the
      fridge. The dripping urine covered my hands and the smell did not leave the
      fridge for several weeks despite numerous cleans. After that - I recognise
      fox markings anywhere!

      I now find, my parsley bed is a favourite place for the fox (probably not
      the same one) to spray - he also does other areas of the garden including
      chives. It's all very well having a food producing forest garden, but if you want
      fresh food without the pungent odour of fox, how do you achieve this?

      Products like "get off my garden", "foxwatch" "brush off" don't seem to work
      and I returned the "water scarecrow' before using it as it did not inspire
      confidence. None of these products are very sustainable but I'm quite happy
      to use commercial products if they work - I'm that keen.

      Any ideas - or must I just learn to tolerate the smell of fox?

      Thanks Marina


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dee Harris
      Quite honestly, a good dog is the best way to handle a fox. Collies are the best to have around children and a fox doesn t like having a dog around. Your
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 17, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Quite honestly, a good dog is the best way to handle a fox. Collies are the best to have around children and a fox doesn't like having a dog around. Your little guy sounds like he has made himself right to home with you. Not a very good idea especially with rabies season on us.
        Wolf


         




        --- On Tue, 3/17/09, richardandmarina@... <richardandmarina@...> wrote:

        From: richardandmarina@... <richardandmarina@...>
        Subject: [pfaf] Foxes
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, March 17, 2009, 3:40 PM






        Sorry if this seems an odd post but wondered if anyone had any effective
        ways to deter foxes from marking their territory on garden produce.

        Most people won't know what fox urine smells like but once identified never
        forgotten! You see, once we had milk delivered on our doorstep and Mr fox
        graced it with his 'gift'. Unbeknown to me, I picked it up and put it in the
        fridge. The dripping urine covered my hands and the smell did not leave the
        fridge for several weeks despite numerous cleans. After that - I recognise
        fox markings anywhere!

        I now find, my parsley bed is a favourite place for the fox (probably not
        the same one) to spray - he also does other areas of the garden including
        chives. It's all very well having a food producing forest garden, but if you want
        fresh food without the pungent odour of fox, how do you achieve this?

        Products like "get off my garden", "foxwatch" "brush off" don't seem to work
        and I returned the "water scarecrow' before using it as it did not inspire
        confidence. None of these products are very sustainable but I'm quite happy
        to use commercial products if they work - I'm that keen.

        Any ideas - or must I just learn to tolerate the smell of fox?

        Thanks Marina

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
        Big cat dung (like lion or tiger), placed along boundaries, is said to be effective. Llama keepers are united in the view that llamas will drive off foxes.
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 17, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Big cat dung (like lion or tiger), placed along boundaries, is said to be effective. Llama keepers are united in the view that llamas will drive off foxes.

          Foxes will get used to any deterrent that does not change, if you use solar charged lights with sensors (for example), move them every few days.

          You can also grow more chives and parsley in places less accessible to foxes - hanging baskets, window boxes, and near fox-repugnant herbs ( Ricinus communis, maybe - said to keep moles away, Hyacinth, Iris, Daffodil, Atropa, Oleander )

          Aren't chives and parsley toxic to foxes ? Maybe an older fox is marking fox toxic plants as a warning to younger foxes : ) Parsley is diuretic and contains furanocoumarins. It is also possible that the fox/es consider these herbs medicinal.

          Matt

          After-thought, at least the fox will be keeping cats off your parsley and chives :)

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: corbywolf13@...
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: 3/17/09 5:05 PM
          Subject: Re: [pfaf] Foxes

          Quite honestly, a good dog is the best way to handle a fox. Collies are the best to have around children and a fox doesn't like having a dog around. Your little guy sounds like he has made himself right to home with you. Not a very good idea especially with rabies season on us.
          Wolf




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jan Langford
          Interesting that there are plants to deter foxes - we grow all of those listed except atropa. ... From: matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com To:
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 18, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Interesting that there are plants to deter foxes - we grow all of those listed except atropa.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: matthew@...
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 12:28 AM
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Foxes


            Big cat dung (like lion or tiger), placed along boundaries, is said to be effective. Llama keepers are united in the view that llamas will drive off foxes.

            Foxes will get used to any deterrent that does not change, if you use solar charged lights with sensors (for example), move them every few days.

            You can also grow more chives and parsley in places less accessible to foxes - hanging baskets, window boxes, and near fox-repugnant herbs ( Ricinus communis, maybe - said to keep moles away, Hyacinth, Iris, Daffodil, Atropa, Oleander )

            Aren't chives and parsley toxic to foxes ? Maybe an older fox is marking fox toxic plants as a warning to younger foxes : ) Parsley is diuretic and contains furanocoumarins. It is also possible that the fox/es consider these herbs medicinal.

            Matt

            After-thought, at least the fox will be keeping cats off your parsley and chives :)

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: corbywolf13@...
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: 3/17/09 5:05 PM
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Foxes

            Quite honestly, a good dog is the best way to handle a fox. Collies are the best to have around children and a fox doesn't like having a dog around. Your little guy sounds like he has made himself right to home with you. Not a very good idea especially with rabies season on us.
            Wolf

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.