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Re: [pfaf] Of all the plants that should be in pfaf... where's the moringa tree?

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  • The Organic Fanatic
    I was wondering if moringa can be planted in zone 5b. I use the leaf for tea. It s really good for you but I would like to have my own supply.
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 7, 2009
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      I was wondering if moringa can be planted in zone 5b. I use the leaf
      for tea. It's really good for you but I would like to have my own
      supply.

      On 3/7/09, Mary <hawk.mistress@...> wrote:
      > I live in central Florida and we've had a couple of freezes, my
      > moringa's survived. Trying to get more going. I put the leaves in any
      > green veggie dish to up the nutrition. They tend to dissolve so you
      > really don't taste them. Some people I know dry the leaves and use in
      > soups & stews as a thickner. One lady who raises goats grow them for
      > fodder.
      >
      > Whole heartedly agree, they are wonderful plants.
      >
      > Mary
      >
      > eptenke wrote:
      >> Hi all,
      >>
      >> I've just learned about moringa trees and am starting to grow some myself.
      >> I was surprised to see that they weren't in the pfaf database, and that
      >> they haven't been discussed on this list.
      >>
      >> Do your own research, but to put it simply, these things are nutritional
      >> powerhouses. There are charitable organizations that revolve around
      >> planting these trees for third-world villages to combat malnutrition.
      >> This tree would, in my opinion, deserve a place on the top 20 list, if not
      >> the top 5. Much of the plant is edible, and medicinal. The leaves have
      >> so many minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, essential oils, etc... that one
      >> wonders how so much could be in this one plant.
      >>
      >
      >
    • Michael Porter
      Orange Springs FL is too cold,- this years freezes has killed all of mine, -- but it is a wonderful tree, --I may see how it will do in my greenhouse,
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 7, 2009
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        Orange Springs FL is too cold,- this years freezes has killed all of mine, -- but it is a wonderful tree, --I may see how it will do in my greenhouse, --Michael Porter

        --- On Sat, 3/7/09, Mary <hawk.mistress@...> wrote:

        From: Mary <hawk.mistress@...>
        Subject: Re: [pfaf] Of all the plants that should be in pfaf... where's the moringa tree?
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, March 7, 2009, 4:07 PM






        I live in central Florida and we've had a couple of freezes, my
        moringa's survived. Trying to get more going. I put the leaves in any
        green veggie dish to up the nutrition. They tend to dissolve so you
        really don't taste them. Some people I know dry the leaves and use in
        soups & stews as a thickner. One lady who raises goats grow them for
        fodder.

        Whole heartedly agree, they are wonderful plants.

        Mary

        eptenke wrote:
        > Hi all,
        >
        > I've just learned about moringa trees and am starting to grow some myself. I was surprised to see that they weren't in the pfaf database, and that they haven't been discussed on this list.
        >
        > Do your own research, but to put it simply, these things are nutritional powerhouses. There are charitable organizations that revolve around planting these trees for third-world villages to combat malnutrition. This tree would, in my opinion, deserve a place on the top 20 list, if not the top 5. Much of the plant is edible, and medicinal. The leaves have so many minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, essential oils, etc... that one wonders how so much could be in this one plant.
        >
















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
        ... http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/message/3691 http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/carth.asp?species=Moringa%20oleifera&sref=29274 ... From:
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 7, 2009
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          >I've just learned about moringa trees and am starting to grow some myself. I was surprised to see that they weren't in the pfaf database, and that they haven't been discussed on this list.<

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/message/3691

          http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/carth.asp?species=Moringa%20oleifera&sref=29274

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: erich.enke@...
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: 3/7/09 1:32 PM
          Subject: [pfaf] Of all the plants that should be in pfaf... where's the moringa tree?

          Hi all,

          I've just learned about moringa trees and am starting to grow some myself. I was surprised to see that they weren't in the pfaf database, and that they haven't been discussed on this list.

          Do your own research, but to put it simply, these things are nutritional powerhouses. There are charitable organizations that revolve around planting these trees for third-world villages to combat malnutrition. This tree would, in my opinion, deserve a place on the top 20 list, if not the top 5. Much of the plant is edible, and medicinal. The leaves have so many minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, essential oils, etc... that one wonders how so much could be in this one plant.

          But I won't give away all the fun. Look it up yourself. :-)

          Cheers,
          Erich



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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael Porter
          Moringa trees are very sensitive to frost, --1 or 2 deg of frost will kill the part affected, -- ... From: The Organic Fanatic
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 8, 2009
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            Moringa trees are very sensitive to frost, --1 or 2 deg of frost will kill the part affected, --

            --- On Sat, 3/7/09, The Organic Fanatic <theorganicfanatic@...> wrote:

            From: The Organic Fanatic <theorganicfanatic@...>
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Of all the plants that should be in pfaf... where's the moringa tree?
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, March 7, 2009, 6:44 PM






            I was wondering if moringa can be planted in zone 5b. I use the leaf
            for tea. It's really good for you but I would like to have my own
            supply.

            On 3/7/09, Mary <hawk.mistress@ verizon.net> wrote:
            > I live in central Florida and we've had a couple of freezes, my
            > moringa's survived. Trying to get more going. I put the leaves in any
            > green veggie dish to up the nutrition. They tend to dissolve so you
            > really don't taste them. Some people I know dry the leaves and use in
            > soups & stews as a thickner. One lady who raises goats grow them for
            > fodder.
            >
            > Whole heartedly agree, they are wonderful plants.
            >
            > Mary
            >
            > eptenke wrote:
            >> Hi all,
            >>
            >> I've just learned about moringa trees and am starting to grow some myself.
            >> I was surprised to see that they weren't in the pfaf database, and that
            >> they haven't been discussed on this list.
            >>
            >> Do your own research, but to put it simply, these things are nutritional
            >> powerhouses. There are charitable organizations that revolve around
            >> planting these trees for third-world villages to combat malnutrition.
            >> This tree would, in my opinion, deserve a place on the top 20 list, if not
            >> the top 5. Much of the plant is edible, and medicinal. The leaves have
            >> so many minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, essential oils, etc... that one
            >> wonders how so much could be in this one plant.
            >>
            >
            >















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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