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Re: Fermentation of Gerasole Artichoke

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  • maartendeprez
    ... This doesn t sound like it right to me. I think it s safer to toss it and try again. I agree with Geir on adding cabbage for bacteria supply. Also, for
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 3, 2009
      > dipped in water, and added a little bit of natural vinegar in it. Now
      > after about 15 days, I found a grey fungus deposit on the surface of
      > the contents, all noddes of artichoke rising up from the bottom of the
      > water, and the water turned to creamish yellow color.

      This doesn't sound like it right to me. I think it's safer to toss it
      and try again. I agree with Geir on adding cabbage for bacteria
      supply. Also, for this kind of fermentation, make sure the fermenting
      stuff remains below water level. Placing a plastic bag filled with
      water on top is an easy solution. Anything coming in contact with the
      air will usually turn bad, at least if there's not a lot of salt in.


      Good luck,
      Maarten
    • matthew@b-and-t-world-seeds.com
      Funny, I ve never had excessive flatulence from eating Helianthus tuberosus, I probably mostly have it as soup and with parsley - maybe that makes a
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 4, 2009
        Funny, I've never had excessive flatulence from eating Helianthus tuberosus, I probably mostly have it as soup and with parsley - maybe that makes a difference. Also, I eat a very varied diet, so perhaps my internal flora and fauna are pretty diverse too.

        Good luck :)
        Matt

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: maarten.deprez@...: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: 2/4/09 2:49 AM
        Subject: [pfaf] Re: Fermentation of Gerasole Artichoke

        > dipped in water, and added a little bit of natural vinegar in it. Now
        > after about 15 days, I found a grey fungus deposit on the surface of
        > the contents, all noddes of artichoke rising up from the bottom of the
        > water, and the water turned to creamish yellow color.

        This doesn't sound like it right to me. I think it's safer to toss it
        and try again. I agree with Geir on adding cabbage for bacteria
        supply. Also, for this kind of fermentation, make sure the fermenting
        stuff remains below water level. Placing a plastic bag filled with
        water on top is an easy solution. Anything coming in contact with the
        air will usually turn bad, at least if there's not a lot of salt in.


        Good luck,
        Maarten


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      • Steve
        Hi everyone, Adding on to Maarten s and Geir s comments, a plate with something heavy on it (like a brick in a bag) will work, too, to keep the ingredients
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 5, 2009
          Hi everyone,

          Adding on to Maarten's and Geir's comments, a plate with something heavy on
          it (like a brick in a bag) will work, too, to keep the ingredients below the
          brine (or whatever your solution is). Make sure your plate is slightly
          smaller than your crock (container) beforehand.

          Also, I said this once earlier in the thread, but grape (or oak) leaves are
          used in some recipes to keep pickles crisp. This may also have some effect
          on the properties of the ingredients.

          Take care,

          Steve.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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