Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

apple preservation

Expand Messages
  • Mary Lloyd
    Dear all, Late last Summer, an immature apple from one of my trees dropped into a bowl of rainwater which has remained there all winter. I have kept it there
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 27, 2009
      Dear all,
      Late last Summer, an immature apple from one of my trees dropped into a bowl of rainwater which has remained there all winter. I have kept it there because it didn't seem to be going off and I wanted to see how long it stayed fresh and firm.
      All the apples from my trees have long ago matured, and have either been eaten by now, or turned into cider, but there are no more keepers left. And yet this little apple is still bright looking and hard, despite going through a cold winter and a few times being half submerged in ice.
      I just cut it open, and the core is brown, but all the flesh is as white as if it had just fallen from the tree.
      It is making me wonder why this is, and whether I could keep my apples for longer by somehow floating them in rainwater. Logic says no, but my little apple argues with logic quite clearly.
      The apple has a small dent where it must have hit the side of the vessel, but even that hasn't deteriorated. There are maple leaves at the bottom of the water: whether that had anything to do with its preserving quality is something to ponder.
      Grateful of anyone's thoughts!
      Love, Whinnie

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • R. Dale Asberry
      This is where the scientific method comes in handy! There may be research already out there, but it could be a simple enough experiment and could be very
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 27, 2009
        This is where the scientific method comes in handy! There may be
        research already out there, but it could be a simple enough experiment
        and could be very insightful.

        Create a hypothesis, or, because you have a number of different
        possibilities, several. Make the hypothesis as specific as possible to
        isolate variables.

        Measure and record in a notebook. Keep all data whether it supports
        the hypothesis or not.

        Determine if the data matches the hypothesis.

        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Lloyd" <mary@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear all,
        > Late last Summer, an immature apple from one of my trees dropped
        into a bowl of rainwater which has remained there all winter. I have
        kept it there because it didn't seem to be going off and I wanted to
        see how long it stayed fresh and firm.
        > All the apples from my trees have long ago matured, and have
        either been eaten by now, or turned into cider, but there are no more
        keepers left. And yet this little apple is still bright looking and
        hard, despite going through a cold winter and a few times being half
        submerged in ice.
        > I just cut it open, and the core is brown, but all the flesh is
        as white as if it had just fallen from the tree.
        > It is making me wonder why this is, and whether I could keep my
        apples for longer by somehow floating them in rainwater. Logic says
        no, but my little apple argues with logic quite clearly.
        > The apple has a small dent where it must have hit the side of
        the vessel, but even that hasn't deteriorated. There are maple leaves
        at the bottom of the water: whether that had anything to do with its
        preserving quality is something to ponder.
        > Grateful of anyone's thoughts!
        > Love, Whinnie
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Rich Morris
        ... Interesting. Floating in water suggests a few hypothesises 1) The apple is quite isolated from the environment. This may protect it from attentions of
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 27, 2009
          Mary Lloyd wrote:
          >
          >
          > Dear all,
          > Late last Summer, an immature apple from one of my trees dropped into a
          > bowl of rainwater which has remained there all winter. ..
          > And yet this little apple is still bright looking and hard, despite
          > going through a cold winter and a few times being half submerged in ice.
          > I just cut it open, and the core is brown, but all the flesh is as white
          > as if it had just fallen from the tree.
          > It is making me wonder why this is, and whether I could keep my apples
          > for longer by somehow floating them in rainwater. Logic says no, but my
          > little apple argues with logic quite clearly.
          > The apple has a small dent where it must have hit the side of the
          > vessel, but even that hasn't deteriorated. There are maple leaves at the
          > bottom of the water: whether that had anything to do with its preserving
          > quality is something to ponder.
          > Grateful of anyone's thoughts!
          > Love, Whinnie

          Interesting. Floating in water suggests a few hypothesises

          1) The apple is quite isolated from the environment. This may protect it
          from attentions of insects and other animals. A bird will not be able to
          peck at it which could allow other critters in. Likewise crawling
          creatures will not be able to get at it.

          2) The water may provide some refrigerating properties. Keeping the
          temperature low will slow rotting.

          3) The maple leaves may have some preservative properties. From the
          database:
          http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Acer+campestre
          "The leaves are packed around apples, rootcrops etc to help preserve
          them[18, 20]."

          4) As it fell it wont have hit the ground hard so will not have been
          bruised.

          5) If the dent is below the water line then it will no be exposed to air
          born bacteria.

          These are all just hypothesise and are most likly nonsense.

          Rich
          --
          Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
          Web: http://www.pfaf.org/
          Post: 1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
          Tel: 01208 872 963
          Email: webweaver@...
          PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf
        • maartendeprez
          ... ice. ... white ... Maybe the immaturity also has to do with it. You told the apple is (or was) still hard. Has it softened a little, is it edible now? If
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 27, 2009
            Whinnie wrote:
            >> And yet this little apple is still bright looking and hard, despite
            >> going through a cold winter and a few times being half submerged in
            ice.
            >> I just cut it open, and the core is brown, but all the flesh is as
            white
            >> as if it had just fallen from the tree.

            Rich wrote:
            > [5 hypotheses]

            Maybe the immaturity also has to do with it. You told the apple is (or
            was) still hard. Has it softened a little, is it edible now? If the
            method works only for immature apples, it would be not useful for
            eating apples; maybe for cider it would work. (But that could already
            count as a kind of preservation method, i guess.) Anyway, i agree it
            is worth researching this. There are also the apple varieties that
            naturally keep quite well; what would be their advantage?


            Greetings,
            Maarten
          • Mary Lloyd
            Thanks all for wonderful info and inspiration! I tasted some of the apple today and it is not at all sweet, but not unpleasant, which you might expect from an
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 28, 2009
              Thanks all for wonderful info and inspiration!

              I tasted some of the apple today and it is not at all sweet, but not unpleasant, which you might expect from an immature apple. If I am going to experiment with mature ones, there will be a higher sugar content, so I guess there will be fermentation if the weather is any warmer next year ....yeasts+sugar+warmth etc.

              I also think I should find some little "cells" to put the apples in so that they don't touch each other, and float them in clean water which can be easily displaced and refilled from the hosepipe to freshen it up through the winter.

              I should choose perfect apples: the skin has a waxy substance which gives it natural protection: that would keep out the bugs and rule out fermentation of contents if it can remain intact.

              I am thinking that the wax plus the cold water makes a doubly protective layer against all kinds of invaders. It will be interesting to see how long the apples can be kept like this. Hopefully longer than normal: some of mine are Laxton Fortune and they are never so nice as when they are straight off the tree.

              Any suggestions for the cells or anything else relevant please say on. Interesting about the maple leaves! My wonderful tree! to think the neighbours want me to do slaughter on it...lol...another story

              I am saving all your posts. I will take it all into consideration and document my findings.

              Thanks again!
              Love, Whinnie
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: maartendeprez
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2009 6:18 PM
              Subject: [pfaf] Re: apple preservation


              Whinnie wrote:
              >> And yet this little apple is still bright looking and hard, despite
              >> going through a cold winter and a few times being half submerged in
              ice.
              >> I just cut it open, and the core is brown, but all the flesh is as
              white
              >> as if it had just fallen from the tree.

              Rich wrote:
              > [5 hypotheses]

              Maybe the immaturity also has to do with it. You told the apple is (or
              was) still hard. Has it softened a little, is it edible now? If the
              method works only for immature apples, it would be not useful for
              eating apples; maybe for cider it would work. (But that could already
              count as a kind of preservation method, i guess.) Anyway, i agree it
              is worth researching this. There are also the apple varieties that
              naturally keep quite well; what would be their advantage?

              Greetings,
              Maarten





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ian
              Had a few thoughts regarding this. I have observed the preservation of floating apples before but I never investigated it as you have. At low temperatures,
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 28, 2009
                Had a few thoughts regarding this.

                I have observed the preservation of floating apples before but I
                never investigated it as you have.

                At low temperatures, apples keep quite well. I believe they
                are refrigerated commercially, Certainly apples I collected
                last year kept in a cold dry room until christmas.

                One of the ways that stored apples deteriorate is, they dehydrate.
                Your floating apples are not going to suffer that way.

                Being a bit of a pond watcher, I know that life there midwater,
                decreases significantly during the winter, on the pond bottom
                there is more going on. Your free floating apple will be mainly
                left alone.

                Apples left on the ground will not only be attacked by animal
                life but also vegetable, moulds etc. These are not likely to
                thrive on a bobbing apple.

                I seem to remember that leaves that fall into a pond, release
                tannins into the water. Small quantities but its a class of
                compounds akin to the tannic acid which is used to make leather.
                A mild preservative possibly.

                Not sure about your cell idea. Probably best to keep the apples
                mobile and Id prefer rain water to tap water. The fish we keep,
                certainly do.
                Might be a good idea to keep them away from the side though.


                Ian.


                "Mary Lloyd" writes:
                > Thanks all for wonderful info and inspiration!
                >
                > I tasted some of the apple today and it is not at all sweet, but not unpleasant, which you might expect from an immature apple. If I am going to experiment with mature ones, there will be a higher sugar content, so I guess there will be fermentation if the weather is any warmer next year ....yeasts+sugar+warmth etc.
                >
                > I also think I should find some little "cells" to put the apples in so that they don't touch each other, and float them in clean water which can be easily displaced and refilled from the hosepipe to freshen it up through the winter.
                >
                > I should choose perfect apples: the skin has a waxy substance which gives it natural protection: that would keep out the bugs and rule out fermentation of contents if it can remain intact.
                >
                > I am thinking that the wax plus the cold water makes a doubly protective layer against all kinds of invaders. It will be interesting to see how long the apples can be kept like this. Hopefully longer than normal: some of mine are Laxton Fortune and they are never so nice as when they are straight off the tree.
                >
                > Any suggestions for the cells or anything else relevant please say on. Interesting about the maple leaves! My wonderful tree! to think the neighbours want me to do slaughter on it...lol...another story
                >
                > I am saving all your posts. I will take it all into consideration and document my findings.
                >
                > Thanks again!
                > Love, Whinnie

                --
                Bye now,
                Ian.
              • Steve
                Hi Mary, One pickling recipe I have uses oak or grape leaves (for tannins) to keep the vegetables crisp. Peace, Steve. [Non-text portions of this message have
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 30, 2009
                  Hi Mary,

                  One pickling recipe I have uses oak or grape leaves (for tannins) to keep
                  the vegetables crisp.

                  Peace,

                  Steve.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.