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Bender living - ecologically sound low impact dwellings that cost very little

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  • Jim
    Put some pictures up for people to have a look and have been meaning to do a bender appreciation page for a long while! Also a design for a tin can stove that
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 7, 2009
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      Put some pictures up for people to have a look and have been meaning
      to do a bender appreciation page for a long while! Also a design for
      a tin can stove that can be bashed together in no time. (credits to
      Jiffy):

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/photos/album/743612114/pic/list

      You just make the bender dome frame of bendy poles (try and just
      weave them together and not use any string!), cover with an inner
      tarp, I would say (which doesn't have to be waterproof.) Cover this
      with a layer of insulating material. People used to use old carpets,
      but I don't like the thought of all the crap from peoples floors
      dropping on top of me so I try and find something else...the brown
      fibre stuff, or new carpet offcuts, you can get as offcuts from
      carpet shop skips is good. Then arrange the canvas or part canvas
      (not 100% synthetic that can't breath) tarp/s as outer cover. The ex
      army tarps I recommend below are a touch small I would say, but the
      longlivity of the things outweighs the slight inconvinience of
      slightly awkward shape and the window holes. You then fit a stove
      with chimney going through a round hole in a tin rectangle set on the
      floor. Attach tarp to wooden slates fixed to edge of tin rectangle.
      Make sure the tarp is safely held away from the chinmey because these
      can get red hot. Get some 'flexipipe' for the chimney stack from
      metal breakers etc. I make the stoves myself out of old cooking oil
      cans from chip shops etc. Cut out a hole at the front. Then a hole at
      the back for the stove pipe. Make a bigger hole where the original
      can opening was - this will act as a cooking hole, which can be
      closed up when not needed by a slightly larger circle of tin cut to
      size or from somewhere)..When that is done you need to burn off the
      paint so bilod a fire outside filling the new stove with wood. You
      can tack doors to the front opening, but they will not make 100%
      sealing up stoves (which U need to have one 'stay in') Its like
      having an open fire in the tent! I like to leave the floor as bare
      earth, which can take a year or so to dry out fully. Make a bed from
      a futon or from wooden pallets. SORTED! Now kids find these dwellings
      the ultimate dens! Very very nice in summer (mossys and flies CAN be
      a problem, whats about the only disadvantage compared to a caravan
      say), extremely cosy and warm in winter.

      The Romans found the indigenous people of Britain living in dwellings
      of this essential design when they invaded. They promtly trashed and
      incinerated them inside there lovely homes. They they
      created 'untruth' saying that thats what the indigenous Celtic
      wiccans did for ritual. (Thesis)

      BLESSED BE

      Source of good quality tarps:

      I've found the ex army green 'rip stock' nylon reinforced tarps to be
      excellent for making long terms benders...and they recently improved
      the grade even further. The material is the best tarp you can get.
      Anchor Military Surplus Supplies in Nottingham quoted a price of £250
      for one new quality tent side peice of tarp. I didn't like that price
      so I source where they get them from which is this place:

      http://www.fieldtextiles.co.uk/

      You'll need to go to their warehouse in Essex. They did me a cubic
      metre of new quality ex army mess tent sides for £150, that would
      contain about 6 tent sides. They also do smaller pieces. Minimum
      order is suppost to be £250, but the manager there a guy called Mark
      was very nice and let me do an order for £150. These green rip stock
      tarps are VERY hard wearing and will last for years wheras ordinary
      tarp will rot very quickly if its outside all the time. This place
      also sells other useful stuff, so take a look at what else you might
      want to get at the same time. (Very cheap gortext bivy sacks, woolen
      socks, sleeping bags and the like).
    • ryborgryborg268
      Field textiles have a nice deal on blue gortex cagoules at the moment...worth going to the warehouse and picking out which sizes you want.
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 3, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Field textiles have a nice deal on blue gortex cagoules at the moment...worth going to the warehouse and picking out which sizes you want.

        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <cromlech108@...> wrote:
        >
        > Put some pictures up for people to have a look and have been meaning
        > to do a bender appreciation page for a long while! Also a design for
        > a tin can stove that can be bashed together in no time. (credits to
        > Jiffy):
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/photos/album/743612114/pic/list
        >
        > You just make the bender dome frame of bendy poles (try and just
        > weave them together and not use any string!), cover with an inner
        > tarp, I would say (which doesn't have to be waterproof.) Cover this
        > with a layer of insulating material. People used to use old carpets,
        > but I don't like the thought of all the crap from peoples floors
        > dropping on top of me so I try and find something else...the brown
        > fibre stuff, or new carpet offcuts, you can get as offcuts from
        > carpet shop skips is good. Then arrange the canvas or part canvas
        > (not 100% synthetic that can't breath) tarp/s as outer cover. The ex
        > army tarps I recommend below are a touch small I would say, but the
        > longlivity of the things outweighs the slight inconvinience of
        > slightly awkward shape and the window holes. You then fit a stove
        > with chimney going through a round hole in a tin rectangle set on the
        > floor. Attach tarp to wooden slates fixed to edge of tin rectangle.
        > Make sure the tarp is safely held away from the chinmey because these
        > can get red hot. Get some 'flexipipe' for the chimney stack from
        > metal breakers etc. I make the stoves myself out of old cooking oil
        > cans from chip shops etc. Cut out a hole at the front. Then a hole at
        > the back for the stove pipe. Make a bigger hole where the original
        > can opening was - this will act as a cooking hole, which can be
        > closed up when not needed by a slightly larger circle of tin cut to
        > size or from somewhere)..When that is done you need to burn off the
        > paint so bilod a fire outside filling the new stove with wood. You
        > can tack doors to the front opening, but they will not make 100%
        > sealing up stoves (which U need to have one 'stay in') Its like
        > having an open fire in the tent! I like to leave the floor as bare
        > earth, which can take a year or so to dry out fully. Make a bed from
        > a futon or from wooden pallets. SORTED! Now kids find these dwellings
        > the ultimate dens! Very very nice in summer (mossys and flies CAN be
        > a problem, whats about the only disadvantage compared to a caravan
        > say), extremely cosy and warm in winter.
        >
        > The Romans found the indigenous people of Britain living in dwellings
        > of this essential design when they invaded. They promtly trashed and
        > incinerated them inside there lovely homes. They they
        > created 'untruth' saying that thats what the indigenous Celtic
        > wiccans did for ritual. (Thesis)
        >
        > BLESSED BE
        >
        > Source of good quality tarps:
        >
        > I've found the ex army green 'rip stock' nylon reinforced tarps to be
        > excellent for making long terms benders...and they recently improved
        > the grade even further. The material is the best tarp you can get.
        > Anchor Military Surplus Supplies in Nottingham quoted a price of £250
        > for one new quality tent side peice of tarp. I didn't like that price
        > so I source where they get them from which is this place:
        >
        > http://www.fieldtextiles.co.uk/
        >
        > You'll need to go to their warehouse in Essex. They did me a cubic
        > metre of new quality ex army mess tent sides for £150, that would
        > contain about 6 tent sides. They also do smaller pieces. Minimum
        > order is suppost to be £250, but the manager there a guy called Mark
        > was very nice and let me do an order for £150. These green rip stock
        > tarps are VERY hard wearing and will last for years wheras ordinary
        > tarp will rot very quickly if its outside all the time. This place
        > also sells other useful stuff, so take a look at what else you might
        > want to get at the same time. (Very cheap gortext bivy sacks, woolen
        > socks, sleeping bags and the like).
        >
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