Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

New Year's Resolution

Expand Messages
  • sustain_ability@123mail.org
    Hello and Happy New Year to all Celebrants, Because I will be in a unique position of considering retirement this coming year, I will again ask my question. Is
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 2, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello and Happy New Year to all Celebrants,

      Because I will be in a unique position of considering retirement this
      coming year, I will again ask my question.

      Is anyone familiar with permaculture or similar methods of growing food
      producing plants in poor soils? In my case, this means acidic soil,
      shallow, more rock per volume than actual organic debris (9:1 ratio,
      roughly), root systems of fiercely competing vegetation produce an
      almost undiggable tangle, short growing season (as short as two months,
      possibility of killer frost in both early June (budding period for
      apples, etc.) and early August (e.g. tomatoes not ripe enough to pick).

      Possible solutions: man-made growing domes, greenhouses and such with
      trucked-in soil, aquaponics (digging water trenches beside and around
      the rock formations as opposed to moving heaven and earth with
      mechanical shovels, blasting), storing heat in earth and rock berms for
      gradual release during cool nights or days to even out temperature
      swings.

      No telling how the plants or fish will respond to any of this. The land
      parcel is situated in a valley of sorts between two ridges, so water in
      spring run-off is always adequate. Late summer may see a water shortage,
      so some water 'banking' is a valid precaution. Wind and solar power will
      be necessary if going off grid, with slight chance of micro hydro; think
      'payback'.

      Finally, tree gardening (lost the link to a U.K. based website that
      details this) - allowing plants in containers to catch the sun both
      earlier and later in the day might be worthwhile. I have some southern
      exposure on one ridge, but the recently produced GPS-based land survey
      leaves me with far less than I previously thought.

      Best Wishes
      Sustain



      --
      http://www.fastmail.fm - The professional email service
    • sustain_ability@123mail.org
      Hello Griselda, The area is the pre-Cambrian Canadian shield, geologically speaking, in Central Canada (Quebec). The existing vegetation is mainly conifers
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 3, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Griselda,

        The area is the pre-Cambrian Canadian shield, geologically speaking, in
        Central Canada (Quebec). The existing vegetation is mainly conifers with
        deciduous trees favouring the southern slopes.

        The surface area is about 14 acres. The arable land is about 2.8 acres.
        The original settlers (over 60 years ago) had small livestock, chickens
        and ducks. I'm guessing there was one family of five people in the
        pre-Permaculture era.

        The location has also become increasingly 'closer' to the growing urban
        areas of the region. One good side to this is that there are more people
        with which to barter/trade. On the negative, the downstream water might
        not be as clean as before.

        (There's a closely guarded 'secretive' aquaponics commercial enterprise
        located in the region. It specializes in greenhouse raised cold water
        trout. These are served fresh-broiled in the adjacent restaurant or sold
        as a smoked delicacy to bussed-in tourists. I mention this also because
        the owners spent 10 years developing this enterprise before it became
        viable.)

        Hope that helps,
        Sustain


        On Sat, 3 Jan 2009 15:41:33 +0000, "Griselda Mussett"
        <griselda1@...> said:
        > What an interesting request. Very graphic descriptions.
        >
        > Can you tell me/us where in the world you are, and how much land is
        > involved? How many people to be sustained on this site?
        >
        > Griselda

        --
        http://www.fastmail.fm - mmm... Fastmail...
      • Jim
        I do know that arid climate permaculture is a well researched, widely practiced and successful field. ... this ... food ... months, ... pick). ... with ...
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 3, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          I do know that arid climate permaculture is a well researched, widely
          practiced and successful field.

          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, sustain_ability@... wrote:
          >
          > Hello and Happy New Year to all Celebrants,
          >
          > Because I will be in a unique position of considering retirement
          this
          > coming year, I will again ask my question.
          >
          > Is anyone familiar with permaculture or similar methods of growing
          food
          > producing plants in poor soils? In my case, this means acidic soil,
          > shallow, more rock per volume than actual organic debris (9:1 ratio,
          > roughly), root systems of fiercely competing vegetation produce an
          > almost undiggable tangle, short growing season (as short as two
          months,
          > possibility of killer frost in both early June (budding period for
          > apples, etc.) and early August (e.g. tomatoes not ripe enough to
          pick).
          >
          > Possible solutions: man-made growing domes, greenhouses and such
          with
          > trucked-in soil, aquaponics (digging water trenches beside and
          around
          > the rock formations as opposed to moving heaven and earth with
          > mechanical shovels, blasting), storing heat in earth and rock berms
          for
          > gradual release during cool nights or days to even out temperature
          > swings.
          >
          > No telling how the plants or fish will respond to any of this. The
          land
          > parcel is situated in a valley of sorts between two ridges, so
          water in
          > spring run-off is always adequate. Late summer may see a water
          shortage,
          > so some water 'banking' is a valid precaution. Wind and solar power
          will
          > be necessary if going off grid, with slight chance of micro hydro;
          think
          > 'payback'.
          >
          > Finally, tree gardening (lost the link to a U.K. based website that
          > details this) - allowing plants in containers to catch the sun both
          > earlier and later in the day might be worthwhile. I have some
          southern
          > exposure on one ridge, but the recently produced GPS-based land
          survey
          > leaves me with far less than I previously thought.
          >
          > Best Wishes
          > Sustain
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > http://www.fastmail.fm - The professional email service
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.