Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Blue potatoes

Expand Messages
  • Peter Ellis
    Today I found something I d never heard of before, in a local supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results, which really surprised me. I
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 30, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Today I found something I'd never heard of before, in a local
      supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results,
      which really surprised me. I thought I'd come across most foods before,
      as I've travelled extensively, but I'd never heard of these, let alone
      seen them before.
      Since they were locally produced, I think I might try growing some,
      although they apparently aren't noted particularly for flavour. One
      source reckoned they were high in antioxidants though.
      I was a bit surprised at finding them, as food colour is controversial.
      I recollect one university experiment where researchers used food dyes
      to colour common foods unusual colours, then tested demand by offering
      them to members of the public. Things like green hamburgers went down
      like a lead balloon!
      Googling also brought up red (as in red fleshed) potatoes and things
      like Yellow Finn, with suggestions for patriotically coloured dishes.

      Has anyone any experience of these?

      Cheers

      Peter
    • Margi
      I ve been growing them for several years. They volunteer readily and i find them tasty. The blue color can be used to accent dishes for enhanced meal
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 30, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I've been growing them for several years. They volunteer readily and i
        find them tasty. The blue color can be used to accent dishes for
        enhanced meal presentation. I suggest you give them a try. I also grow
        yukon golds and pink fingerlings. I am in western oregon in a maritime
        growing climate.

        ~margi

        Peter Ellis wrote:
        >
        > Today I found something I'd never heard of before, in a local
        > supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results,
        > which really surprised me. I thought I'd come across most foods before,
        > as I've travelled extensively, but I'd never heard of these, let alone
        > seen them before.
        > Since they were locally produced, I think I might try growing some,
        > although they apparently aren't noted particularly for flavour. One
        > source reckoned they were high in antioxidants though.
        > I was a bit surprised at finding them, as food colour is controversial.
        > I recollect one university experiment where researchers used food dyes
        > to colour common foods unusual colours, then tested demand by offering
        > them to members of the public. Things like green hamburgers went down
        > like a lead balloon!
        > Googling also brought up red (as in red fleshed) potatoes and things
        > like Yellow Finn, with suggestions for patriotically coloured dishes.
        >
        > Has anyone any experience of these?
        >
        > Cheers
        >
        > Peter
        >


        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • mirakulu2003
        Are these GMO potatoes? Peter Ellis wrote: Today I found something I d never heard of before, in a local supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 30, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Are these GMO potatoes?

          Peter Ellis wrote:

          Today I found something I'd never heard of before, in a local
          supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results,
          which really surprised me. I thought I'd come across most foods before,
          as I've travelled extensively, but I'd never heard of these, let alone
          seen them before.
        • Johanna Knox
          These are heritage potatoes. Here in New Zealand, there are several varieties beginning to be grown commercially and also preserved through generations of
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 30, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            These are heritage potatoes. Here in New Zealand, there are several
            varieties beginning to be grown commercially and also preserved through
            generations of families.

            I'm not quite sure where they came from, but Maori have cultivated them and
            preserved them here for over two centuries I believe, and the blue potatoes,
            along with other heritage potatoes, are known here in NZ as Maori potatoes.

            (They were either brought over by early European whalers, sealers, etc., or
            Maori brought them back from their own trips overseas or both.)

            The most well known blue potato here is urenika.

            Best
            Johanna


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • howigetby
            Woops, my sister used my laptop while I was in Tucson, and forgot to logout of Yahoo. Sent my reply from her email by mistake. Don t know if it actually went
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 30, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Woops, my sister used my laptop while I was in Tucson, and forgot to
              logout of Yahoo. Sent my reply from her email by mistake. Don't know
              if it actually went thru or not since she isn't a member of this group.

              Anyway, in case it didn't, I am very familiar with the all blue (or
              purple) potatoes. I really enjoy them. They taste a little sweeter to
              me than the normal white fleshed ones.

              They make a really creamy mashed potato and they make a wonderful
              baked potato too because they never get mealy. Not so great for french
              fries because they are a soft potato (not mushy, just softer than the
              typical potato).

              Saved a few in the fridge from this summer to plant in the spring so I
              can have a many as I want in 2009. I have a hard time finding them in
              the grocery stores.

              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "mirakulu2003" <mirakulu2003@...> wrote:
              >
              > Are these GMO potatoes?
              >
              > Peter Ellis wrote:
              >
              > Today I found something I'd never heard of before, in a local
              > supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results,
              > which really surprised me. I thought I'd come across most foods before,
              > as I've travelled extensively, but I'd never heard of these, let alone
              > seen them before.
              >
            • howigetby
              No, not GMO. They are actually an heirloom variety.
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 30, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                No, not GMO. They are actually an heirloom variety.

                --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "mirakulu2003" <mirakulu2003@...> wrote:
                >
                > Are these GMO potatoes?
                >
                > Peter Ellis wrote:
                >
                > Today I found something I'd never heard of before, in a local
                > supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results,
                > which really surprised me. I thought I'd come across most foods before,
                > as I've travelled extensively, but I'd never heard of these, let alone
                > seen them before.
                >
              • Margi
                Heck no. They are not GMO. I don t do GMO. There are all sorts of colorful potatoes that originated in Peru including these. ~margi
                Message 7 of 11 , Nov 30, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Heck no. They are not GMO. I don't "do" GMO. There are all sorts of
                  colorful potatoes that originated in Peru including these.

                  ~margi

                  mirakulu2003 wrote:
                  >
                  > Are these GMO potatoes?
                  >
                  > Peter Ellis wrote:
                  >
                  > Today I found something I'd never heard of before, in a local
                  > supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results,
                  > which really surprised me. I thought I'd come across most foods before,
                  > as I've travelled extensively, but I'd never heard of these, let alone
                  > seen them before.
                  >
                  >
                • Peter Ellis
                  The message ... I don t thinks so. They seem to originate in Peru. Cheers Peter
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 1, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The message <ggva5v+p097@...>
                    from "mirakulu2003" <mirakulu2003@...> contains these words:

                    > Are these GMO potatoes?

                    I don't thinks so. They seem to originate in Peru.

                    Cheers

                    Peter
                  • Griselda Mussett
                    Yes, they are quite tasty. Some are quite old varieties like Edzell (sp?) which has been around for about 100 years I think, named after a place in Scotland.
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 1, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Yes, they are quite tasty. Some are quite old varieties like Edzell
                      (sp?) which has been around for about 100 years I think, named after
                      a place in Scotland. You can get black, blue and purple spuds as
                      well as red and white of course. We've been eating and growing these
                      for several years.
                      Griselda


                      On 30 Nov 2008, at 22:29, Peter Ellis wrote:

                      > Today I found something I'd never heard of before, in a local
                      > supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results,
                      > which really surprised me. I thought I'd come across most foods
                      > before,
                      > as I've travelled extensively, but I'd never heard of these, let alone
                      > seen them before.
                      > Since they were locally produced, I think I might try growing some,
                      > although they apparently aren't noted particularly for flavour. One
                      > source reckoned they were high in antioxidants though.
                      > I was a bit surprised at finding them, as food colour is
                      > controversial.
                      > I recollect one university experiment where researchers used food dyes
                      > to colour common foods unusual colours, then tested demand by offering
                      > them to members of the public. Things like green hamburgers went down
                      > like a lead balloon!
                      > Googling also brought up red (as in red fleshed) potatoes and things
                      > like Yellow Finn, with suggestions for patriotically coloured dishes.
                      >
                      > Has anyone any experience of these?
                      >
                      > Cheers
                      >
                      > Peter
                      >
                      >

                      The news isn't that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it's
                      that they are so good for you they could save your life.
                      By David Bjerklie, TIME Magazine, October 20,
                      2003
                      Juice PLUS+ Capsules contain 17 fruits, vegetables, oats and grains.
                      The ingredients are apples, cranberries, dates, oranges, papaya,
                      peaches, pineapples, beets, broccoli, carrots, cabbage, kale,
                      tomatoes, parsley, garlic, spinach, rice bran (no gluten), and oats
                      (no gluten).
                      and ~ NEW - Juice PLUS+ Vineyard Blend adds Blueberries, Cranberries,
                      Concorde Grape, Blackberries, Bilberries, Grape Seed, Raspberry,
                      Elderberries, Red Currants, and Black Currants.
                      Check it out www.juiceplus.co.uk/+gm027255






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Geir Flatabø
                      They are not GMO, they are old varieties, and since fruiting might give new seedling offsprings. In Norway we have at least 4 varieties differing in the degree
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 1, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        They are not GMO, they are old varieties,
                        and since fruiting might give new seedling offsprings.
                        In Norway we have at least 4 varieties differing in the degree of coloring
                        through the tuber,
                        being the "blackest one" "Svart Valdres" also yealding the least, looking
                        most primitive - elongated tubers with lots of deep eyes.
                        The one grown commercially Blå Congo, is an early variety, also grown in
                        Sweden.
                        THey are blight susceptible, not easy to grow, but tasting OK.
                        Especially OK to serve as "Mashed potatoes" in a childrens party...

                        Ive tried a few red varieties without luck, much too disease sensitive...

                        Geir Flatabø


                        2008/12/1 Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...>

                        > Yes, they are quite tasty. Some are quite old varieties like Edzell
                        > (sp?) which has been around for about 100 years I think, named after
                        > a place in Scotland. You can get black, blue and purple spuds as
                        > well as red and white of course. We've been eating and growing these
                        > for several years.
                        > Griselda
                        >
                        >
                        > On 30 Nov 2008, at 22:29, Peter Ellis wrote:
                        >
                        > > Today I found something I'd never heard of before, in a local
                        > > supermarket, blue potatoes. Googling them produced lots of results,
                        > > which really surprised me. I thought I'd come across most foods
                        > > before,
                        > > as I've travelled extensively, but I'd never heard of these, let alone
                        > > seen them before.
                        > > Since they were locally produced, I think I might try growing some,
                        > > although they apparently aren't noted particularly for flavour. One
                        > > source reckoned they were high in antioxidants though.
                        > > I was a bit surprised at finding them, as food colour is
                        > > controversial.
                        > > I recollect one university experiment where researchers used food dyes
                        > > to colour common foods unusual colours, then tested demand by offering
                        > > them to members of the public. Things like green hamburgers went down
                        > > like a lead balloon!
                        > > Googling also brought up red (as in red fleshed) potatoes and things
                        > > like Yellow Finn, with suggestions for patriotically coloured dishes.
                        > >
                        > > Has anyone any experience of these?
                        > >
                        > > Cheers
                        > >
                        > > Peter
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > The news isn't that fruits and vegetables are good for you ~ it's
                        > that they are so good for you they could save your life.
                        > By David Bjerklie, TIME Magazine, October 20,
                        > 2003
                        > Juice PLUS+ Capsules contain 17 fruits, vegetables, oats and grains.
                        > The ingredients are apples, cranberries, dates, oranges, papaya,
                        > peaches, pineapples, beets, broccoli, carrots, cabbage, kale,
                        > tomatoes, parsley, garlic, spinach, rice bran (no gluten), and oats
                        > (no gluten).
                        > and ~ NEW - Juice PLUS+ Vineyard Blend adds Blueberries, Cranberries,
                        > Concorde Grape, Blackberries, Bilberries, Grape Seed, Raspberry,
                        > Elderberries, Red Currants, and Black Currants.
                        > Check it out www.juiceplus.co.uk/+gm027255
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Mat Coward
                        I find some of the blue spuds very tasty - especially small ones, cooked whole in pies, where they hold their texture very well. Here in the UK you can buy
                        Message 11 of 11 , Dec 2, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I find some of the blue spuds very tasty - especially small ones, cooked whole in pies, where they hold their texture very well. Here in the UK you can buy "seed" of them very easily from several mail order sources. The colour does take a bit of getting used to, especially if you have them as mash - and of course, it's a bit tricky to tell when they've gone green!
                          - Mat
                          http://homepages.phonecoop.coop/matcoward/

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.