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Old Uk apple varieties

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  • Jim
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/nov/04/apples-orchards- national-trust-cotehele
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 4, 2008
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    • Mary Lloyd
      Hi Jim and everyone who replied on the apple topic. This link doesn t seem to work Jim btw. Many thanks for comments. I now have seed, AND a little plantlet
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 4, 2008
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        Hi Jim and everyone who replied on the apple topic. This link doesn't seem to work Jim btw.
        Many thanks for comments. I now have seed, AND a little plantlet from the root, plus I will be taking pieces for grafting onto an existing apple in the garden. I might just as well go for it.
        The apple itself is supremely aromatic, very tasty and sharp enough for cooking. I wondered if it might be an apple crossed with a quince because it is yellow and the shape is very similar, but the flesh is juicy, with all the characteristics of a cooking apple except it has a fragrance 10 times more powerful than Bramley.
        Who knows, I may have seedlings next year!
        Much love from Whinnie
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Jim
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2008 11:54 PM
        Subject: [pfaf] Old Uk apple varieties


        http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/nov/04/apples-orchards-
        national-trust-cotehele





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jim
        OOO sounds lovly. You ll have to cut and paste the entire link into the browser - it does that sometimes (I mean not having the entire link address so that it
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 5, 2008
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          OOO sounds lovly. You'll have to cut and paste the entire link into
          the browser - it does that sometimes (I mean not having the entire
          link address so that it doesn't automatically).

          Jim

          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Lloyd" <mary@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jim and everyone who replied on the apple topic. This link
          doesn't seem to work Jim btw.
          > Many thanks for comments. I now have seed, AND a little
          plantlet from the root, plus I will be taking pieces for grafting
          onto an existing apple in the garden. I might just as well go for it.
          > The apple itself is supremely aromatic, very tasty and sharp
          enough for cooking. I wondered if it might be an apple crossed with a
          quince because it is yellow and the shape is very similar, but the
          flesh is juicy, with all the characteristics of a cooking apple
          except it has a fragrance 10 times more powerful than Bramley.
          > Who knows, I may have seedlings next year!
          > Much love from Whinnie
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Jim
          > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2008 11:54 PM
          > Subject: [pfaf] Old Uk apple varieties
          >
          >
          > http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/nov/04/apples-
          orchards-
          > national-trust-cotehele
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Ute Bohnsack
          Hi, The Irish Seedsavers Association irishseedsavers.ie have done some work on self-rooting apple varieties. http://irishseedsavers.ie/article.php?artid=242
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 5, 2008
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            Hi,
            The Irish Seedsavers Association irishseedsavers.ie have done some work on
            self-rooting apple varieties.
            http://irishseedsavers.ie/article.php?artid=242

            There aren't many that can be propagated in this way.
            As to seeds, yes, some superb varieties are chance seedlings. However, I
            understand that chances of getting a good chance seedling are about 14,000 to 1.
            It really is a lottery.
            As a propagation method, i.e. to get the same good apple from which the seed was
            taken, the tree needs to be self-fertile and not many apple trees are. Plus
            there must not be another apple tree or crabapple tree within a considerable radius
            (bee range) that could cross-pollinate the tree.
            Most apples need one (diploid varieties), if not two (triploid varieties)
            pollination partner(s) of another compatible variety to set fruit (and thus seed)
            so by default the seed are "mixed breed".
            This is why apples are normally propagated by grafting and IMHO it's the only
            way you can propagate that lovely tree you found. If you are very lucky
            self-rooting will work but it's a gamble.

            HTH
            Ute
          • Richard Morris
            Has anyone mentioned Cool Temperate Permaculture, the chap there is very into own-root fruit trees http://www.cooltemperate.co.uk/own_root.shtml his
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 5, 2008
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              Has anyone mentioned Cool Temperate Permaculture, the chap there is
              very into "own-root" fruit trees
              http://www.cooltemperate.co.uk/own_root.shtml
              his catalogue has a number of varities which do well on their own roots.

              Rich
            • Marshall and Endemann
              ... Hi Jim, I did that and there s still something wrong. It won t open for me. Chris [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 5, 2008
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                > You'll have to cut and paste the entire link into
                > the browser - it does that sometimes (I mean not having the entire
                > link address so that it doesn't automatically).

                Hi Jim, I did that and there's still something wrong. It won't open for
                me.

                Chris


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Bryn Thomas
                there s a sussex apple variety called tinsley quince cos its fruit are quince like. Are you in sussex? Bryn
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 6, 2008
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                  there's a sussex apple variety called tinsley quince cos its fruit are quince like. Are you in sussex?
                  Bryn
                • Mary Lloyd
                  Hi Bryn, I was born in Kent, lived in Surrey and worked a while in Sussex....lol...but I moved to Wales in my late teens and stayed here. Thanks for the info,
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 8, 2008
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                    Hi Bryn,
                    I was born in Kent, lived in Surrey and worked a while in Sussex....lol...but I moved to Wales in my late teens and stayed here.
                    Thanks for the info, I will look that up!
                    Blessings
                    Whinnie
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Bryn Thomas
                    To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, November 06, 2008 10:47 PM
                    Subject: [pfaf] Re: Old Uk apple varieties


                    there's a sussex apple variety called tinsley quince cos its fruit are quince like. Are you in sussex?
                    Bryn





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