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Plants For A Future - A pheonix from the ashes?

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  • Richard Morris
    Plants For A Future - A pheonix from the ashes? Its time for a big re think at the Blagdon site. The first three years of the planning planning has now
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 13, 2003
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      Plants For A Future - A pheonix from the ashes?

      Its time for a big re think at the Blagdon site. The
      first three years of the planning planning has now expired,
      and we are putting a new application together and are
      currently in discussion with the planners. Its now the perfect
      time to form a new group with a fresh out look and a number
      of new faces are already appearing. We will be holding
      regular meetings on the 3 weekend of each month starting on
      the 19th/20th July. If you want to get involved please
      come along to the meeting, ring 01208 872 963 for details.

      We've also come to the conclusion that we really have more
      land than we need. We would be happy to talk with groups
      and individuals looking for land.

      The immediate focus will be on making the site presentable
      and clear of tat. Good progress has been made in this direction:
      all the piles of hardcore have now been crushed and turned
      into a car park and big fun was had demolishing caravans.
      Theres still a few more to go if you fancy a bit of destruction!
      After that work will begin on planting around the entrance way.

      The Field in Cornwall is looking really vibrant at the moment,
      from a distance it really beginning to look like a woodland.
      Two new volunteers have been coming a couple of times a week
      and new volunteers are always welcome.

      Plans are afoot for getting the catalogue off the ground.
      We have already been in contact with a number of small nurseries
      who are growing plants for us. Together they can supply 175
      PFAF style plants.

      --
      Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
      Web: http://www.pfaf.org/ same as http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/pfaf/
      Post: 1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
      Tel: 01208 872 963 / 0845 458 4719
      Email: webmaster@...
      PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf
    • Rain Tenaqiya
      Does anyone know if it is possible to have Crataegus schraderiana shipped to the US? I would really like to introduce this species to the US West Coast food
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 18, 2003
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        Does anyone know if it is possible to have Crataegus schraderiana shipped to the US?  I would really like to introduce this species to the US West Coast food foresters.
         
        Thanks,
         
        Rain

        Richard Morris <webmaster@...> wrote:
        Plants For A Future - A pheonix from the ashes?

        Its time for a big re think at the Blagdon site. The
        first three years of the planning planning has now expired,
        and we are putting a new application together and are
        currently in discussion with the planners. Its now the perfect
        time to form a new group with a fresh out look and a number
        of new faces are already appearing. We will be holding
        regular meetings on the 3 weekend of each month starting on
        the 19th/20th July. If you want to get involved please
        come along to the meeting, ring 01208 872 963 for details.

        We've also come to the conclusion that we really have more
        land than we need. We would be happy to talk with groups
        and individuals looking for land.

        The immediate focus will be on making the site presentable
        and clear of tat. Good progress has been made in this direction:
        all the piles of hardcore have now been crushed and turned
        into a car park and big fun was had demolishing caravans.
        Theres still a few more to go if you fancy a bit of destruction!
        After that work will begin on planting around the entrance way.

        The Field in Cornwall is looking really vibrant at the moment,
        from a distance it really beginning to look like a woodland.
        Two new volunteers have been coming a couple of times a week
        and new volunteers are always welcome.

        Plans are afoot for getting the catalogue off the ground.
        We have already been in contact with a number of small nurseries
        who are growing plants for us. Together they can supply 175
        PFAF style plants.

        --
        Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
        Web:   http://www.pfaf.org/ same as http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/pfaf/
        Post:  1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
        Tel:      01208 872 963 / 0845 458 4719     
        Email: webmaster@...
        PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf





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      • Ken Fern
        Dear Rain, Yes, it is possible to ship plants to the United States, though you would have to contact your local Government Department of Agriculture to see if
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 18, 2003
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          Dear Rain,
           
          Yes, it is possible to ship plants to the United States, though you would have to contact your local Government Department of Agriculture to see if Crataegus can be imported. If so, then you would also need to obtain a phytosanitary certificate from the nursery sending you the plants, to ensure that they were free of any pests or diseases. If you do take this route, then I could send you details of nurseries in Britain that supply the plant.
           
          Alternatively, you could try importing the seed. This is likely to be a lot easier and cheaper than plants, though it will take considerably longer to produce fruiting trees. If you would like to try the seed route, then we could send some seed from our tree at PFAF in Cornwall. It is a very good fruiter with heavy yields most years and excellent quality fruit.
           
          Please let us know by late August if you want seed.
           
          Love
           
          Ken Fern
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2003 12:31 AM
          Subject: [pfaf] Crataegus schraderiana

          Does anyone know if it is possible to have Crataegus schraderiana shipped to the US?  I would really like to introduce this species to the US West Coast food foresters.
           
          Thanks,
           
          Rain

        • Boomverzorging VZW
          When you want to produce plants by seed, there is always a risk of cross-pollination. It could lead to a hybrid that does not have good fruit. So maybe it
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 19, 2003
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            When you want to produce plants by seed, there is always a risk of cross-pollination. It could lead to a hybrid that does not have good fruit. So maybe it could be more interesting to send cuttings from the plant.
            For cuttings you must be able to get a phytosantary rapport more easily than for plants, and you can be sure the plant is going to be a good fruiting plant.
             
            Wim peeters
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Ken Fern
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2003 8:58 AM
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Crataegus schraderiana

            Dear Rain,
             
            Yes, it is possible to ship plants to the United States, though you would have to contact your local Government Department of Agriculture to see if Crataegus can be imported. If so, then you would also need to obtain a phytosanitary certificate from the nursery sending you the plants, to ensure that they were free of any pests or diseases. If you do take this route, then I could send you details of nurseries in Britain that supply the plant.
             
            Alternatively, you could try importing the seed. This is likely to be a lot easier and cheaper than plants, though it will take considerably longer to produce fruiting trees. If you would like to try the seed route, then we could send some seed from our tree at PFAF in Cornwall. It is a very good fruiter with heavy yields most years and excellent quality fruit.
             
            Please let us know by late August if you want seed.
             
            Love
             
            Ken Fern
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2003 12:31 AM
            Subject: [pfaf] Crataegus schraderiana

            Does anyone know if it is possible to have Crataegus schraderiana shipped to the US?  I would really like to introduce this species to the US West Coast food foresters.
             
            Thanks,
             
            Rain



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          • Ken Fern
            I ve never had any luck striking cuttings of Crataegus species, though you can use winter cuttings to graft onto rootstocks. Our tree is fairly well isolated
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 19, 2003
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              I've never had any luck striking cuttings of Crataegus species, though you can use winter cuttings to graft onto rootstocks.
               
              Our tree is fairly well isolated from other Crataegus species that are likely to hybridise with it, though as you say hybridisation is always a possibility.
               
              By the way, if anyone out there has succeeded with striking cuttings of Crataegus, please let me know your methods.
               
              Love 
               
              Ken Fern
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2003 9:34 AM
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] Crataegus schraderiana

              When you want to produce plants by seed, there is always a risk of cross-pollination. It could lead to a hybrid that does not have good fruit. So maybe it could be more interesting to send cuttings from the plant.
              For cuttings you must be able to get a phytosantary rapport more easily than for plants, and you can be sure the plant is going to be a good fruiting plant.
               
              Wim peeters
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Ken Fern
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2003 8:58 AM
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] Crataegus schraderiana

              Dear Rain,
               
              Yes, it is possible to ship plants to the United States, though you would have to contact your local Government Department of Agriculture to see if Crataegus can be imported. If so, then you would also need to obtain a phytosanitary certificate from the nursery sending you the plants, to ensure that they were free of any pests or diseases. If you do take this route, then I could send you details of nurseries in Britain that supply the plant.
               
              Alternatively, you could try importing the seed. This is likely to be a lot easier and cheaper than plants, though it will take considerably longer to produce fruiting trees. If you would like to try the seed route, then we could send some seed from our tree at PFAF in Cornwall. It is a very good fruiter with heavy yields most years and excellent quality fruit.
               
              Please let us know by late August if you want seed.
               
              Love
               
              Ken Fern
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2003 12:31 AM
              Subject: [pfaf] Crataegus schraderiana

              Does anyone know if it is possible to have Crataegus schraderiana shipped to the US?  I would really like to introduce this species to the US West Coast food foresters.
               
              Thanks,
               
              Rain



              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            • James M. Cheshire
              Hello, everyone. I m new here; allow me to introduce myself. My name is James, I m 18 and I hope to earn a masters in horticulture and open a nursery. I am
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 24, 2003
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                Hello, everyone. I'm new here; allow me to introduce
                myself. My name is James, I'm 18 and I hope to earn a
                masters in horticulture and open a nursery. I am very
                interested in 'new' crops, especially those native to
                the USA; I have studied, to some extent, the pawpaw
                (Asimina triloba) and the groundnut (Apios americana).
                Currently, however, I have a pet interest in the
                hawthorns (Crataegus). I am mostly concerned with
                their ornamental value, but after recently sampling
                the pome of a highly endemic Florida species, C.
                lacrimata, I became interested in fruit production.
                Which brings me to my question; where can I obtain
                that gem called Crataegus schraderiana? I was planning
                to try and hybridise it with American species of
                superior fruit quality, such as C. mollis, C.
                succulenta, C. flava, etc. And of course I want the
                fruit themselves! I'm looking for a source of either
                seeds or plants; it doesn't matter.

                Thanks!

                Sincerely,
                James

                =====
                James M. Cheshire, horticulture student
                Location: Central Ohio, USA
                Climate: Humid Continental, Zone 6a
                Webpage: http://members.gardenweb.com/members/lamiaceae

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