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pictures of the plum in Istria

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  • charfair fairchar
    I don t know why I am thinking it might be a persimmon, but if you took a picture, that might help some people with experience with wild fruits. -- Charlotte
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 9, 2008
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      I don't know why I am thinking it might be a persimmon, but if you took a
      picture, that might help some people with experience with wild fruits.


      --
      Charlotte
      www.IonWays.com/Liphart


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Peter Ellis
      Hi Charlotte I ll try tomorrow. It s not a persimmon, though. We have those also and they are much bigger. The locals call it zizula. Googling that isn t much
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 10, 2008
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        Hi Charlotte

        I'll try tomorrow. It's not a persimmon, though. We have those also and
        they are much bigger.
        The locals call it zizula. Googling that isn't much help though as the
        name is more commonly used for a type of butterfly.

        Cheers

        Peter



        The message <cdce5c9f0810091332i352b35fdkdd8600a6276a16e8@...>
        from "charfair fairchar" <FertilityFair@...> contains these words:

        > I don't know why I am thinking it might be a persimmon, but if you took a
        > picture, that might help some people with experience with wild fruits.


        > --
        > Charlotte
        > www.IonWays.com/Liphart
      • maartendeprez
        ... the name is more commonly used for a type of butterfly. Hm, could it be Zizyphus (jujube)? Look at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Ziziphus_zizyphus . I
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 10, 2008
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          > The locals call it zizula. Googling that isn't much help though as
          the name is more commonly used for a type of butterfly.

          Hm, could it be Zizyphus (jujube)? Look at
          http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Ziziphus_zizyphus . I googled for
          "zizula fruit -butterfly Istria" and the first match says:

          "Zizula
          .i.ula, Zizyphus jujube, or jujube, growing wild and requiring no
          special care, is greatly appreciated by people living in the Zadar and
          Šibenik areas. It would probably be just as popular among tourists,
          except for the fact that it arrives on the markets after the summer
          season, and almost the entire crop is consumed fresh, thus giving
          diligent housewives no opportunity to turn them into a more permanent
          preserve, such as jam. In Istria the fruit are immersed in rakia, with
          the addition of a small amount of sugar, and left for two weeks in the
          sun, a process which transforms the rakia into a delicious liqueur."


          Maarten
        • Peter Ellis
          The message ... Hi Maarten I think you have it exactly. I must have put it badly into Google as I didn t get this. I have a jar of
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 11, 2008
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            The message <gcoliu+7f4t@...>
            from "maartendeprez" <maarten.deprez@...> contains these words:

            > > The locals call it zizula. Googling that isn't much help though as
            > the name is more commonly used for a type of butterfly.

            > Hm, could it be Zizyphus (jujube)? Look at
            > http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Ziziphus_zizyphus . I googled for
            > "zizula fruit -butterfly Istria" and the first match says:

            > "Zizula
            > .i.ula, Zizyphus jujube, or jujube, growing wild and requiring no
            > special care, is greatly appreciated by people living in the Zadar and
            > �ibenik areas. It would probably be just as popular among tourists,
            > except for the fact that it arrives on the markets after the summer
            > season, and almost the entire crop is consumed fresh, thus giving
            > diligent housewives no opportunity to turn them into a more permanent
            > preserve, such as jam. In Istria the fruit are immersed in rakia, with
            > the addition of a small amount of sugar, and left for two weeks in the
            > sun, a process which transforms the rakia into a delicious liqueur."


            > Maarten

            Hi Maarten

            I think you have it exactly. I must have put it badly into Google as I
            didn't get this. I have a jar of the rakija that I was given a couple of
            years ago and haven't yet opened. I'd always assumed they were nuts in
            it, as they do with honey. I hadn't made the connection with this week's
            fruit.

            I must check now on the actual tree, to see if the other suggestion of
            Christ's Thorn is something else, or if the two are the same thing.

            Kindest regards

            Peter
          • maartendeprez
            ... The point is, i added -butterfly so it won t show any page having butterfly in it, and fruit to make it even more specific. It is often useful to
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 11, 2008
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              > I think you have it exactly. I must have put it badly into Google as I
              > didn't get this.

              The point is, i added "-butterfly" so it won't show any page having
              "butterfly" in it, and "fruit" to make it even more specific. It is
              often useful to experiment a bit.


              I think this jujube is the kind of fruit i bought at a Chinese
              supermarket and used in fruit Kefir. They have them dried or smoked.
              Smoked gives, not surprizingly, a smoky flavour, with i somewhat odd
              in Kefir, but can be nice with rice or so.

              Never got a seed from the store-bought fruits to germinate though. I
              can't remember if i used the smoked ones (probably not good) or the
              other. They may need a knife to speed up germination. Good look
              identifying the trees!


              Maarten
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