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Re: Grow an apple tree from seed

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  • vic_doyle
    I woul;d very much like to hear from anyone who has experience of apple tree cuttings grafted onto aother stock such as ROWAN which grow in massive abundance
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 3, 2008
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      I woul;d very much like to hear from anyone who has experience of
      apple tree cuttings grafted onto aother stock such as ROWAN which
      grow in massive abundance on the hills where I live (Due to the
      collapse of hillside sheep farming), The sheep would nip anything
      that grows and now they don't the Rowan is regenerating faster than
      anything else, would'nt it be superb if they could be grafted and
      become food producing, also I believe that it would be in the coming
      months that thjis would happen. Any ideas out there?


      --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Jack P. Brooks" <jackpbrooks@...> wrote:
      >
      > I don't know about apple, but I've started many orange, lemon and
      grapefruit plants from the seed of the fruit bough from my local
      grocery store. The trick I learned was to soak the seeds in water for
      24 hours to get rid of all the acid and then just plant them in clay
      pots, I find all my plants do much better in clay.
      >
      >
      > I'd risk all to be remembered as "humbly and honourably correct".
      God forbid, never as politically correct!
      >
      >
      > God Bless!
      >
      > Jack P. Brooks
      > http://www.angelfire.com/me2/whynot
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Sara Elbrai
      The chances of an apple seedling being good for eating are far better than 50/50. You can wander all over North America trying seedling apples and well over
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 4, 2008
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        The chances of an apple seedling being good for eating are far better than 50/50.

        You can wander all over North America trying seedling apples and well over 50% are fine for eating. The flavors are sometimes not what you are familiar with and the sugar levels are often low, but the fruit is still more often than not good for eating. After all, almost anything tastes better than Red Delicious.

        The problems with apple seedlings often have nothing to do with the edibility of the fruit.The problems often involve small size fruit, over bearing, branches that break either with too much fruit or too much ice, under bearing, and lack of disease or insect resistance.

        Sara


        --- On Wed, 10/1/08, Mathew Waehner <waehner@...> wrote:

        > From: Mathew Waehner <waehner@...>
        > Subject: Re: [pfaf] Grow an apple tree from seed
        > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 9:45 AM
        > I've read that the chances of the seedling apple being
        > good for eating raw
        > (rather than cider) are about one in thirty thousand. If
        > you plant the five
        > seeds from the Granny Smith apple, you could get five
        > radically different
        > trees with very different fruits.
        >
        > If you're looking for a good eating apple, it is
        > probably worth buying a
        > tree; cider apples are extremly useful for producing hard
        > cider or vinegar.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On Tue, Sep 30, 2008 at 5:35 PM, Dee Harris
        > <corbywolf13@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Griselda, thank you so much for that little piece of
        > inspiration. I just
        > > happen to have some granny smith apples. Wonder what I
        > can do with the
        > > seeds? Hmm
        > > Grinning,
        > > Wolf
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- On Tue, 9/30/08, Griselda Mussett
        > <griselda1@...<griselda1%40btopenworld.com>>
        > > wrote:
        > >
        > > From: Griselda Mussett
        > <griselda1@...<griselda1%40btopenworld.com>
        > > >
        > > Subject: Re: [pfaf] Grow an apple tree from seed
        > > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        > <pfaf%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 3:40 PM
        > >
        > > Ah, just plant the seed in some earth, keep coolish
        > till it
        > > germinates.. .
        > >
        > > Apples do not come true from seed, they always create
        > a new variety.
        > > That is how many famous and useful kinds of apples
        > were discovered,
        > > from chance seedlings. They are v easy to grow, but
        > you have to wait a
        > > few years to see if the fruit and other
        > characteristics of your apple
        > > seedlings is of any use.
        > >
        > > Lovely task!
        > >
        > > Griselda
        > >
        > > On 30 Sep 2008, at 21:28, charfair fairchar wrote:
        > >
        > > > I just received a dehydrator in the mail as a
        > present from my sister. I
        > > > don't know if I need to dehydrate the lemon
        > seeds before mailing to
        > > > other
        > > > places?
        > > > These lemons look like yellow ping pong's and
        > they are fuzzy.
        > > >
        > > > I would like to trade for something. How do I
        > grow an apple tree from
        > > > seed?
        > > >
        > > > --
        > > > Charlotte Fairchild Liphart
        > > > Georgia, USA
        > > > www.IonWays. com/Liphart
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > removed]
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Geir Flatabø
        To my knowledge apples will not take - ie cannot be grafted on Rowan - Sorbus spp. But pears can / will, and you can of course graft the sweet Rowans -
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 7, 2008
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          To my knowledge
          apples will not "take" - ie cannot be grafted on Rowan - Sorbus spp.

          But pears can / will,
          and you can of course graft the sweet Rowans - Sorbus aucuparia "Edulis"
          that makes nice fruits. And so do the XSorbopyrus auricularis with nice
          fruits..
          Pears on ROwan will most often be a bit acrid - literature says so, and
          that is also my experience, better for grafting then are other whitebeams
          like
          Sorbus hybrida, Sorbus meinichii, S. rupicola etc... those have been
          extensively used for grafting rootstock in Norway.

          Geir Flatabø


          2008/10/3, vic_doyle <vic_doyle@...>:
          >
          > I woul;d very much like to hear from anyone who has experience of
          > apple tree cuttings grafted onto aother stock such as ROWAN which
          > grow in massive abundance on the hills where I live (Due to the
          > collapse of hillside sheep farming), The sheep would nip anything
          > that grows and now they don't the Rowan is regenerating faster than
          > anything else, would'nt it be superb if they could be grafted and
          > become food producing, also I believe that it would be in the coming
          > months that thjis would happen. Any ideas out there?
          >
          >
          > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Jack P. Brooks" <jackpbrooks@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I don't know about apple, but I've started many orange, lemon and
          > grapefruit plants from the seed of the fruit bough from my local
          > grocery store. The trick I learned was to soak the seeds in water for
          > 24 hours to get rid of all the acid and then just plant them in clay
          > pots, I find all my plants do much better in clay.
          > >
          > >
          > > I'd risk all to be remembered as "humbly and honourably correct".
          > God forbid, never as politically correct!
          > >
          > >
          > > God Bless!
          > >
          > > Jack P. Brooks
          > > http://www.angelfire.com/me2/whynot
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


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