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potato blight in Wales

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  • Mary Lloyd
    Hi everyone, I want to grow potatoes next year but I am in Wales and we get a lot of rain which brings the potato blight. I have lost crops before to this
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 9, 2008
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      Hi everyone,
      I want to grow potatoes next year but I am in Wales and we get a lot of rain which brings the potato blight. I have lost crops before to this fungus and am wondering if anyone has tackled this problem with the organic herbal fungicides we discussed earlier with any success.
      I don't like using chemicals at all, but here with the rainfall there are two major problems hard to beat with gentle methods: slugs and snails, and blight. I have a pond with frogs and toads a-plenty. But this year the slugs and snails have been so bad it makes me feel really fed up and wondering whether there is any point in growing normal vegetables at all.
      My garden has changed towards perennial and unusual veg to some extent, but I am feeling disheartened and ready to change more radically, in what I grow and how. Glad of any comments.
      Love, Whinnie

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Geir Flatabø
      There are quite a few potato varieties that are +/- blight resistant, esp Sarpo Mira and other Sarpo varieties.... give great crops with very little
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 9, 2008
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        There are quite a few potato varieties that are +/- blight resistant,
        esp Sarpo Mira and other "Sarpo" varieties....
        give great crops with very little fertilizer..
        Thompson & Morgan is marketing some

        Geir Flatabø

        2008/9/9 Mary Lloyd <mary@...>

        > Hi everyone,
        > I want to grow potatoes next year but I am in Wales and we get a
        > lot of rain which brings the potato blight. I have lost crops before to this
        > fungus and am wondering if anyone has tackled this problem with the organic
        > herbal fungicides we discussed earlier with any success.
        > I don't like using chemicals at all, but here with the rainfall
        > there are two major problems hard to beat with gentle methods: slugs and
        > snails, and blight. I have a pond with frogs and toads a-plenty. But this
        > year the slugs and snails have been so bad it makes me feel really fed up
        > and wondering whether there is any point in growing normal vegetables at
        > all.
        > My garden has changed towards perennial and unusual veg to some
        > extent, but I am feeling disheartened and ready to change more radically, in
        > what I grow and how. Glad of any comments.
        > Love, Whinnie
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Erez Gur
        As far as I remember, the organism that causes potato blight stays in the soil virtually forever and there is no chemical (even industrial) that will destroy
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 9, 2008
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          As far as I remember, the organism that causes potato blight stays in the soil virtually forever and there is no chemical (even industrial) that will destroy it.

          It seems your only choice is to plant a blight-resistant potato cultivar.
        • Pat Meadows
          ... You can buy slug/snail bait in the UK now that is based on iron-phosphates, a natural substance in the soil. This is not harmful to wild life, not harmful
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 10, 2008
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            On Tue, 9 Sep 2008 08:13:06 +0100, you wrote:

            >Hi everyone,
            > I want to grow potatoes next year but I am in Wales and we get a lot of rain which brings the potato blight. I have lost crops before to this fungus and am wondering if anyone has tackled this problem with the organic herbal fungicides we discussed earlier with any success.
            > I don't like using chemicals at all, but here with the rainfall there are two major problems hard to beat with gentle methods: slugs and snails, and blight.

            You can buy slug/snail bait in the UK now that is based on iron-phosphates,
            a natural substance in the soil. This is not harmful to wild life, not
            harmful to pets, etc.

            It works *very well*. It is not instant: 'Poof, begone!' But if you use
            it, and sprinkle it around as directed, within a week or so, your problem
            should start to clear up.

            We're in the USA, but in a fairly comparatively cool and rainy area and
            trust me, we have slugs and snails here. I also know people in the UK who
            have said it works very well for them.

            One place that sells it in the UK is Garden Organic, the former Henry
            Doubleday Research Association, the primary promoter (I believe) of organic
            farming in the UK. This is what they say about it:

            "The slug pellets we've all been waiting for. Safe for children and pets,
            birds, hedgehogs and other wildlife - killing only slugs and snails.
            After remaining effective for several weeks in both wet and dry conditions,
            the pellets based on ferric phosphate will break down to iron and phosphate
            nutrients as part of garden soil."

            http://www.organiccatalog.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=2599

            There is at least one other online seller in the UK, and the other one is
            cheaper. I don't remember its name, however. You can find it by Googling
            on 'iron phosphate slug bait UK'.

            We've had this product in the States for a while, but it only began to be
            sold in the UK a little while ago, I believe.

            For the potato blight - which is also a problem here for both potatoes and
            tomatoes - I have found that an *organic* product called 'Serenade' gives
            very good control. We spray weekly from the time that we transplant the
            tomatoes outdoors or the time the potato foliage pokes up above the soil.
            It also gives good control of downy and powdery mildew, btw, on cucurbits.

            Serenade is accepted as organic by the OMRI (I forget exactly what the
            initials stand for, it's the board that certifies things as organic in the
            States).

            I do not know if this product is yet sold in the UK. But you could email
            them and ask if you want to. Here's the website: www.serenadegarden.com

            It's an excellent product, in my experience.

            Pat
            -- northern Pennsylvania
            Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html

            "Rats and roaches live by competition under the laws of
            supply and demand. It is the privilege of human beings to
            live under the laws of justice and mercy." - Wendell Berry
          • Peter Ellis
            The message ... What happened to the Henry Doubleday Research Association ? I used to recommend it to people but
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 10, 2008
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              The message <5r6gc4t45ldpnsa8j7l78uutu10g1r4deh@...>
              from Pat Meadows <pat@...> contains these words:

              > One place that sells it in the UK is Garden Organic, the former Henry
              > Doubleday Research Association, the primary promoter (I believe) of organic
              > farming in the UK.

              What happened to the Henry Doubleday Research Association ? I used to
              recommend it to people but it seems to have changed completely. You
              could formerly get seeds from them and more if you were willing to
              return seeds, for a vast selection of heritage vegetables. I couldn't
              work it out from the new site.

              Cheers

              Peter
            • Mary Lloyd
              Thanks Pat and all for all the info, especially the safe slug bait...which I will purchase by the ton, lol. Looking also for serenade and will be locating
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 11, 2008
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                Thanks Pat and all for all the info, especially the safe slug
                bait...which I will purchase by the ton, lol.
                Looking also for "serenade" and will be locating blight resistant
                potatoes, Thompson and Morgan seem to have them.

                When I had an allotment a few years back, I grew a variety of potato
                called Concorde. I think it was a second early but the tubers were
                large, great for baking and chipping, and kept fine for months. I
                seem to remember they had put on all their growth by the time that
                misty rain came in July, the stuff that brings the blight with it,
                but I never found that particular variety afterwards. If I can locate
                it, plus a blight-resistant maincrop, and a treatment like serenade,
                I ought to be on the winning side...will let you know!

                By the way, I only found this post by visiting the pfaf site itself:
                I never got it in my inbox. Worth a visit to check the messages from
                time to time in case we are missing replies.

                Thanks again!
                Much love from Whinnie
                --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Pat Meadows <pat@...> wrote:
                >
                > On Tue, 9 Sep 2008 08:13:06 +0100, you wrote:
                >
                > >Hi everyone,
                > > I want to grow potatoes next year but I am in Wales and
                we get a lot of rain which brings the potato blight. I have lost
                crops before to this fungus and am wondering if anyone has tackled
                this problem with the organic herbal fungicides we discussed earlier
                with any success.
                > > I don't like using chemicals at all, but here with the
                rainfall there are two major problems hard to beat with gentle
                methods: slugs and snails, and blight.
                >
                > You can buy slug/snail bait in the UK now that is based on iron-
                phosphates,
                > a natural substance in the soil. This is not harmful to wild life,
                not
                > harmful to pets, etc.
                >
                > It works *very well*. It is not instant: 'Poof, begone!' But if
                you use
                > it, and sprinkle it around as directed, within a week or so, your
                problem
                > should start to clear up.
                >
                > We're in the USA, but in a fairly comparatively cool and rainy area
                and
                > trust me, we have slugs and snails here. I also know people in the
                UK who
                > have said it works very well for them.
                >
                > One place that sells it in the UK is Garden Organic, the former
                Henry
                > Doubleday Research Association, the primary promoter (I believe) of
                organic
                > farming in the UK. This is what they say about it:
                >
                > "The slug pellets we've all been waiting for. Safe for children and
                pets,
                > birds, hedgehogs and other wildlife - killing only slugs and snails.
                > After remaining effective for several weeks in both wet and dry
                conditions,
                > the pellets based on ferric phosphate will break down to iron and
                phosphate
                > nutrients as part of garden soil."
                >
                > http://www.organiccatalog.com/catalog/product_info.php?
                products_id=2599
                >
                > There is at least one other online seller in the UK, and the other
                one is
                > cheaper. I don't remember its name, however. You can find it by
                Googling
                > on 'iron phosphate slug bait UK'.
                >
                > We've had this product in the States for a while, but it only began
                to be
                > sold in the UK a little while ago, I believe.
                >
                > For the potato blight - which is also a problem here for both
                potatoes and
                > tomatoes - I have found that an *organic* product called 'Serenade'
                gives
                > very good control. We spray weekly from the time that we
                transplant the
                > tomatoes outdoors or the time the potato foliage pokes up above the
                soil.
                > It also gives good control of downy and powdery mildew, btw, on
                cucurbits.
                >
                > Serenade is accepted as organic by the OMRI (I forget exactly what
                the
                > initials stand for, it's the board that certifies things as organic
                in the
                > States).
                >
                > I do not know if this product is yet sold in the UK. But you could
                email
                > them and ask if you want to. Here's the website:
                www.serenadegarden.com
                >
                > It's an excellent product, in my experience.
                >
                > Pat
                > -- northern Pennsylvania
                > Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html
                >
                > "Rats and roaches live by competition under the laws of
                > supply and demand. It is the privilege of human beings to
                > live under the laws of justice and mercy." - Wendell Berry
                >
              • bslark@aol.com
                Hi Pat and everyone. I am in West Wales near Cardigan and have been fighting the slugs for 6 years now.My veg plot is surrounded on 3 sides by my 4 acre?forest
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 11, 2008
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                  Hi Pat and everyone.

                  I am in West Wales near Cardigan and have been fighting the slugs for 6 years now.My veg plot is surrounded on 3 sides by my 4 acre?forest garden where apart from the trees which are mulched at least a metre all round and some narrow paths the habitat is natural and not cut more than once a year.So there are millions of slugs cueing up to taste any young green things I care to grow. I would need tons of slug bait to deal with that so this winter I intend to create a metre wide barrier around the veg plot filled with bark chippings,wood ash and seaweed and for extra alkalinity which slugs hate, sprinkle some epsom salts and just to be sure some organic slug?pellets.Then I can go to work on the beds knowing that I will have some sort of control over events using the iron posphate slug bait and manual picking.Until then I will only grow veg that can survive and?give me a crop such as:sweet corn,leek,turnip,chard,asparugus,rubarb,garlic&onion.

                  Re Potaoes:

                  I do like them like most folks,?but they are not a healthy food. They have a high GI value and especially when stored they develop myco toxins which buid up the longer a tuber is stored especially when bruised or when cropped after blight has attacked as the blight simply lives woithin the tuber. Then of course they are high on the acidic scale also.So why?not try an alternative?? go to http://www.realseeds.co.uk/unusualtubers.html? where there are 3 different tuberous plants that are not affected by the blight. I know this because I am growing Oca (also mentioned by Ken Fern)?for the first time this year and the slugs simly hate the foliage though I do have to wait until late autumn to see what kind of harvest I will get.Real Seeds are base at our local well known comunity (Tony Wrench of round house fame) and have a website packed with important information such as how to save seed (strange other seed suppliers don't do this) and you won't find any F1 hybrid varieties either).

                  Good luck with the battle

                  Bruce






                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Pat Meadows <pat@...>
                  To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 20:27
                  Subject: Re: [pfaf] potato blight in Wales






                  On Tue, 9 Sep 2008 08:13:06 +0100, you wrote:

                  >Hi everyone,
                  > I want to grow potatoes next year but I am in Wales and we get a lot of rain which brings the potato blight. I have lost crops before to this fungus and am wondering if anyone has tackled this problem with the organic herbal fungicides we discussed earlier with any success.
                  > I don't like using chemicals at all, but here with the rainfall there are two major problems hard to beat with gentle methods: slugs and snails, and blight.

                  You can buy slug/snail bait in the UK now that is based on iron-phosphates,
                  a natural substance in the soil. This is not harmful to wild life, not
                  harmful to pets, etc.

                  It works *very well*. It is not instant: 'Poof, begone!' But if you use
                  it, and sprinkle it around as directed, within a week or so, your problem
                  should start to clear up.

                  We're in the USA, but in a fairly comparatively cool and rainy area and
                  trust me, we have slugs and snails here. I also know people in the UK who
                  have said it works very well for them.

                  One place that sells it in the UK is Garden Organic, the former Henry
                  Doubleday Research Association, the primary promoter (I believe) of organic
                  farming in the UK. This is what they say about it:

                  "The slug pellets we've all been waiting for. Safe for children and pets,
                  birds, hedgehogs and other wildlife - killing only slugs and snails.
                  After remaining effective for several weeks in both wet and dry conditions,
                  the pellets based on ferric phosphate will break down to iron and phosphate
                  nutrients as part of garden soil."

                  http://www.organiccatalog.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=2599

                  There is at least one other online seller in the UK, and the other one is
                  cheaper. I don't remember its name, however. You can find it by Googling
                  on 'iron phosphate slug bait UK'.

                  We've had this product in the States for a while, but it only began to be
                  sold in the UK a little while ago, I believe.

                  For the potato blight - which is also a problem here for both potatoes and
                  tomatoes - I have found that an *organic* product called 'Serenade' gives
                  very good control. We spray weekly from the time that we transplant the
                  tomatoes outdoors or the time the potato foliage pokes up above the soil.
                  It also gives good control of downy and powdery mildew, btw, on cucurbits.

                  Serenade is accepted as organic by the OMRI (I forget exactly what the
                  initials stand for, it's the board that certifies things as organic in the
                  States).

                  I do not know if this product is yet sold in the UK. But you could email
                  them and ask if you want to. Here's the website: www.serenadegarden.com

                  It's an excellent product, in my experience.

                  Pat
                  -- northern Pennsylvania
                  Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html

                  "Rats and roaches live by competition under the laws of
                  supply and demand. It is the privilege of human beings to
                  live under the laws of justice and mercy." - Wendell Berry




                  ________________________________________________________________________
                  AOL Email goes Mobile! You can now read your AOL Emails whilst on the move. Sign up for a free AOL Email account with unlimited storage today.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Geir Flatabø
                  2008/9/11 bslark@aol.com ... In fact a Norwegian scientist states the opposite. He says that one of the main reasons for increasing human health and
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 11, 2008
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                    2008/9/11 bslark@...

                    > Potaoes:
                    >
                    > I do like them like most folks,?but they are not a healthy food. They have
                    > a high GI value and especially when stored they develop myco toxins which
                    > buid up the longer a tuber is stored especially when bruised or when cropped
                    > after blight has attacked as the blight simply lives woithin the tuber.

                    In fact a Norwegian scientist states the opposite.
                    He says that one of the main reasons for increasing human health and
                    reproduction that came with growing and eating potatoes in Europe ( and esp
                    Ireland)
                    was because according to him the very much lower content of mycotoxins in
                    potato crops , than in the alternative cereal crops....
                    To my knowledge Potato Blight is not a fungus , and is not producing
                    mycotoxins, so should not be a problem even if there was some in the
                    tubers. But then in resistant varieties there is no or nearly no bligt ,
                    neither above nor below ground.

                    The health aspect is of course a matter of how much potatoes you eat, and
                    cold (cooked)potatoes have lower index than warm potatoes.

                    Oca is absolutely no alternative to potatoes here, as the crop is rather a
                    percent of the potato crop (short day crop) , still it is nice to grow. If
                    it is more healthy I`m not sure, maybe not cause the high oxalic acid
                    content, and less vitamin C (?)....

                    Geir Flatabø

                    > Then of course they are high on the acidic scale also.So why?not try an
                    > alternative?? go to http://www.realseeds.co.uk/unusualtubers.html? where
                    > there are 3 different tuberous plants that are not affected by the blight. I
                    > know this because I am growing Oca (also mentioned by Ken Fern)?for the
                    > first time this year and the slugs simly hate the foliage though I do have
                    > to wait until late autumn to see what kind of harvest I will get.Real Seeds
                    > are base at our local well known comunity (Tony Wrench of round house fame)
                    > and have a website packed with important information such as how to save
                    > seed (strange other seed suppliers don't do this) and you won't find any F1
                    > hybrid varieties eith!
                    > er).
                    >
                    > Good luck with the battle
                    >
                    > Bruce
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Pat Meadows <pat@...>
                    > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 20:27
                    > Subject: Re: [pfaf] potato blight in Wales
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > On Tue, 9 Sep 2008 08:13:06 +0100, you wrote:
                    >
                    > >Hi everyone,
                    > > I want to grow potatoes next year but I am in Wales and we get a lot of
                    > rain which brings the potato blight. I have lost crops before to this fungus
                    > and am wondering if anyone has tackled this problem with the organic herbal
                    > fungicides we discussed earlier with any success.
                    > > I don't like using chemicals at all, but here with the rainfall there are
                    > two major problems hard to beat with gentle methods: slugs and snails, and
                    > blight.
                    >
                    > You can buy slug/snail bait in the UK now that is based on iron-phosphates,
                    > a natural substance in the soil. This is not harmful to wild life, not
                    > harmful to pets, etc.
                    >
                    > It works *very well*. It is not instant: 'Poof, begone!' But if you use
                    > it, and sprinkle it around as directed, within a week or so, your problem
                    > should start to clear up.
                    >
                    > We're in the USA, but in a fairly comparatively cool and rainy area and
                    > trust me, we have slugs and snails here. I also know people in the UK who
                    > have said it works very well for them.
                    >
                    > One place that sells it in the UK is Garden Organic, the former Henry
                    > Doubleday Research Association, the primary promoter (I believe) of organic
                    > farming in the UK. This is what they say about it:
                    >
                    > "The slug pellets we've all been waiting for. Safe for children and pets,
                    > birds, hedgehogs and other wildlife - killing only slugs and snails.
                    > After remaining effective for several weeks in both wet and dry conditions,
                    > the pellets based on ferric phosphate will break down to iron and phosphate
                    > nutrients as part of garden soil."
                    >
                    > http://www.organiccatalog.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=2599
                    >
                    > There is at least one other online seller in the UK, and the other one is
                    > cheaper. I don't remember its name, however. You can find it by Googling
                    > on 'iron phosphate slug bait UK'.
                    >
                    > We've had this product in the States for a while, but it only began to be
                    > sold in the UK a little while ago, I believe.
                    >
                    > For the potato blight - which is also a problem here for both potatoes and
                    > tomatoes - I have found that an *organic* product called 'Serenade' gives
                    > very good control. We spray weekly from the time that we transplant the
                    > tomatoes outdoors or the time the potato foliage pokes up above the soil.
                    > It also gives good control of downy and powdery mildew, btw, on cucurbits.
                    >
                    > Serenade is accepted as organic by the OMRI (I forget exactly what the
                    > initials stand for, it's the board that certifies things as organic in the
                    > States).
                    >
                    > I do not know if this product is yet sold in the UK. But you could email
                    > them and ask if you want to. Here's the website: www.serenadegarden.com
                    >
                    > It's an excellent product, in my experience.
                    >
                    > Pat
                    > -- northern Pennsylvania
                    > Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html
                    >
                    > "Rats and roaches live by competition under the laws of
                    > supply and demand. It is the privilege of human beings to
                    > live under the laws of justice and mercy." - Wendell Berry
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________________________________________________
                    > AOL Email goes Mobile! You can now read your AOL Emails whilst on the move.
                    > Sign up for a free AOL Email account with unlimited storage today.
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Pat Meadows
                    ... I don t know; I m in the USA. So far as I know, they just changed their name, and they still do that. But maybe they ran afoul of EU regulations on seeds,
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 12, 2008
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                      On Wed, 10 Sep 2008 22:29:15 +0200, you wrote:

                      >The message <5r6gc4t45ldpnsa8j7l78uutu10g1r4deh@...>
                      >from Pat Meadows <pat@...> contains these words:
                      >
                      >> One place that sells it in the UK is Garden Organic, the former Henry
                      >> Doubleday Research Association, the primary promoter (I believe) of organic
                      >> farming in the UK.
                      >
                      >What happened to the Henry Doubleday Research Association ? I used to
                      >recommend it to people but it seems to have changed completely. You
                      >could formerly get seeds from them and more if you were willing to
                      >return seeds, for a vast selection of heritage vegetables. I couldn't
                      >work it out from the new site.

                      I don't know; I'm in the USA. So far as I know, they just changed their
                      name, and they still do that.

                      But maybe they ran afoul of EU regulations on seeds, which I have read are
                      ferocious, and totally slanted against seed exchanges and small seed
                      sellers. (I.e., the equivalent of several thousand dollars being required
                      to 'register' a seed before it can be legally sold.)

                      You could probably email them and ask.

                      Pat
                      -- northern Pennsylvania
                      Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html

                      "Rats and roaches live by competition under the laws of
                      supply and demand. It is the privilege of human beings to
                      live under the laws of justice and mercy." - Wendell Berry
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