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Re: [pfaf] Introducing garter snakes to eat slugs?

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  • Spidra Webster
    No native snakes? Yay! Another country to put on my love list . As for slugs, you might want to try nematodes. Wiggly Wigglers sell them. I haven t gotten
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 1, 2008
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      No native snakes? Yay! Another country to put on my "love list".

      As for slugs, you might want to try nematodes. Wiggly Wigglers sell
      them. I haven't gotten any myself because I haven't been able to
      tell whether the nematodes used are also native in the US and I don't
      want to introduce anything.

      http://wigglywigglers.co.uk/shop/product.html?product_id=218


      On Aug 31, 2008, at 12:18 PM, maartendeprez wrote:

      > Hello.
      >
      > Because of a slug plague, i'm tempted to introduce garter snakes into
      > the garden to control the slug population. Some species can survive in
      > temperate climate and they are harmless to humans. But i'm unsure
      > about their effects on the ecosystem, so i need advice. There are no
      > native snakes here (Belgium).


      Megan Lynch

      Berkeley, CA

      CRFG, NAFEX: I'm in USDA Zone 9b

      Garden with me on Folia: http://myfolia.com/gardener/spidra/invite
      Golden Gate Chapter Blog: http://crfggoldengate.blogspot.com/

      CRFG Flickr Pool: http://www.flickr.com/groups/crfg/

      Chapter Events on Upcoming.org: http://upcoming.yahoo.com/group/3429/



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • vic_doyle
      The life cycle of a slug is that the parent of slug eggs coats the said slug eggs with slime everyday, the hormone in the slime stops the eggs hatching, if the
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 2, 2008
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        The life cycle of a slug is that the parent of slug eggs coats the
        said slug eggs with slime everyday, the hormone in the slime stops
        the eggs hatching, if the parent is killed by nematodes or anything
        else, the eggs hatch and the parent slug is replaced by lots of
        little baby slugs, cunning eh?
        Nematodes only last a short while, handy to time them as your
        seedlings pop up out of the ground if you time it JUST right eh?
        Khaki Campbell ducks are the best sustainable cure for slug problems,
        they eat them all year round.


        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Spidra Webster <spidra@...> wrote:
        >
        > No native snakes? Yay! Another country to put on my "love list".
        >
        > As for slugs, you might want to try nematodes. Wiggly Wigglers
        sell
        > them. I haven't gotten any myself because I haven't been able to
        > tell whether the nematodes used are also native in the US and I
        don't
        > want to introduce anything.
        >
        > http://wigglywigglers.co.uk/shop/product.html?product_id=218
        >
        >
        > On Aug 31, 2008, at 12:18 PM, maartendeprez wrote:
        >
        > > Hello.
        > >
        > > Because of a slug plague, i'm tempted to introduce garter snakes
        into
        > > the garden to control the slug population. Some species can
        survive in
        > > temperate climate and they are harmless to humans. But i'm unsure
        > > about their effects on the ecosystem, so i need advice. There are
        no
        > > native snakes here (Belgium).
        >
        >
        > Megan Lynch
        >
        > Berkeley, CA
        >
        > CRFG, NAFEX: I'm in USDA Zone 9b
        >
        > Garden with me on Folia: http://myfolia.com/gardener/spidra/invite
        > Golden Gate Chapter Blog: http://crfggoldengate.blogspot.com/
        >
        > CRFG Flickr Pool: http://www.flickr.com/groups/crfg/
        >
        > Chapter Events on Upcoming.org:
        http://upcoming.yahoo.com/group/3429/
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • n_udoh
        It is unlikely that they would survive in the long term. It is true that they can survive low temperatures, but they require a longer summer period (due to the
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 2, 2008
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          It is unlikely that they would survive in the long term. It is true
          that they can survive low temperatures, but they require a longer
          summer period (due to the snake's UV, feeding and metabolic
          requirements) than you have in Belgium. Put simply; they need a longer
          warm period to get enough sun and food to survive the winter. You don't
          have a long enough or hot enough summer in Belgium
          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "maartendeprez" <maarten.deprez@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello.
          >
          > Because of a slug plague, i'm tempted to introduce garter snakes into
          > the garden to control the slug population. Some species can survive in
          > temperate climate and they are harmless to humans. But i'm unsure
          > about their effects on the ecosystem, so i need advice. There are no
          > native snakes here (Belgium).
          >
          >
          > Greetings,
          > Maarten
          >
        • n_udoh
          Native toads would do the job much better. Create toad-friendly areas and shelters and introduce one or more toads.
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 2, 2008
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            Native toads would do the job much better. Create toad-friendly areas
            and shelters and introduce one or more toads.

            --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "maartendeprez" <maarten.deprez@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello.
            >
            > Because of a slug plague, i'm tempted to introduce garter snakes into
            > the garden to control the slug population. Some species can survive in
            > temperate climate and they are harmless to humans. But i'm unsure
            > about their effects on the ecosystem, so i need advice. There are no
            > native snakes here (Belgium).
            >
            >
            > Greetings,
            > Maarten
            >
          • Pat Meadows
            ... They d have an awful time trying to find slugs through a couple of feet snow, which we re apt to have for most of the winter. I think the slugs themselves
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 7, 2008
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              On Tue, 02 Sep 2008 09:44:54 -0000, you wrote:

              >The life cycle of a slug is that the parent of slug eggs coats the
              >said slug eggs with slime everyday, the hormone in the slime stops
              >the eggs hatching, if the parent is killed by nematodes or anything
              >else, the eggs hatch and the parent slug is replaced by lots of
              >little baby slugs, cunning eh?
              >Nematodes only last a short while, handy to time them as your
              >seedlings pop up out of the ground if you time it JUST right eh?
              >Khaki Campbell ducks are the best sustainable cure for slug problems,
              >they eat them all year round.

              They'd have an awful time trying to find slugs through a couple of feet
              snow, which we're apt to have for most of the winter.

              I think the slugs themselves must hibernate or die, to be replaced by eggs
              in spring or something along those lines. We have six months of
              below-freezing temperatures. (Northeastern USA).

              So I think maybe ducks eat slugs all year round in some places, but not in
              others.

              Pat
              -- northern Pennsylvania
              Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html

              "Rats and roaches live by competition under the laws of
              supply and demand. It is the privilege of human beings to
              live under the laws of justice and mercy." - Wendell Berry
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