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composting /skunk cabbage

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  • auroragarden2002
    Does anyone have Knowlege about using skunk cabbage as mulch, or in the compost pile.Also any info on what nutrients or toxins it may contain {pertaining to
    Message 1 of 7 , May 25, 2003
      Does anyone have Knowlege about using skunk cabbage as mulch, or in
      the compost pile.Also any info on what nutrients or toxins it may
      contain {pertaining to using it as mulch or in the compost pile} I`m
      not interested in eating it . Or where I could search for the
      info .
      THANX

      Bren
    • Rain Tenaqiya
      All I ve heard is that skunk cabbage is high in magnesium. I wouldn t assume that it is toxic. Rain auroragarden2002 wrote: Does
      Message 2 of 7 , May 25, 2003
        All I've heard is that skunk cabbage is high in magnesium.  I wouldn't assume that it is toxic.
         
        Rain

        auroragarden2002 <auroragarden2002@...> wrote:
        Does anyone have Knowlege about using skunk cabbage as mulch, or in 
        the compost pile.Also any info on what nutrients  or toxins it may
        contain {pertaining to using it as mulch or in the compost pile} I`m
        not interested in eating it . Or where I could search for the
        info .  
        THANX

        Bren



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      • Catherine Sweeney
        When I was learning from an herbalist we went to collect mullien and she made sure I knew the differece between that and skunk cabbage. I was told it was
        Message 3 of 7 , May 26, 2003
          When I was learning from an herbalist we went to collect mullien and she made sure I knew the differece between that and skunk cabbage. I was told it was highly toxic. So I would research to see if the toxicity would effect your mulch and plantings. Before putting a lot of work into it. It may be like deadly nightshade which has some health benifits but only if used correctly by someone who knows what they are doing.  Caat
           
           All I've heard is that skunk cabbage is high in magnesium.  I wouldn't assume that it is toxic.
           
        • Ken Fern
          Skunk cabbage is poisonous when eaten raw, but it was often used as a food when cooked (which destroys the poisonous principle). To quote from the PFAF
          Message 4 of 7 , May 26, 2003
            Skunk cabbage is poisonous when eaten raw, but it was often used as a food
            when cooked (which destroys the poisonous principle). To quote from the PFAF
            database:-

            The plant is rich in calcium oxalate, this is toxic and if consumed makes
            the mouth and digestive tract feel as though hundreds of needles are being
            stuck into it. However, calcium oxalate is easily destroyed by thoroughly
            cooking or drying the plant.

            As far as I know, the plant is perfectly safe to use as a mulch or in the
            compost heap, it certainly produces very humus-rich soil wherever it grows.
            There are surprisingly few leaves that have negative effects upon plant
            growth or the soil - some such as walnut leaves and cherry laurel leaves can
            inhibit the growth of seedlings but this can be very helpful when using them
            as a mulch under established plants. I would certainly have no problems
            either in composting skunk cabbage or using it as a mulch

            All the best

            Ken Fern

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "auroragarden2002" <auroragarden2002@...>
            To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, May 25, 2003 3:24 PM
            Subject: [pfaf] composting /skunk cabbage


            > Does anyone have Knowlege about using skunk cabbage as mulch, or in
            > the compost pile.Also any info on what nutrients or toxins it may
            > contain {pertaining to using it as mulch or in the compost pile} I`m
            > not interested in eating it . Or where I could search for the
            > info .
            > THANX
            >
            > Bren
            >
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • manofpeace32
            - drying or cooking skunk cabage is the way to go. (I don t have experience wuiht it yet. It has a chemical called oxalate acid. I call It fiberglass(I don t
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 12 12:07 PM
              -
              drying or cooking skunk cabage is the way to go.
              (I don't have experience wuiht it yet.

              It has a chemical called oxalate acid.
              I call It fiberglass(I don't know)
              (if you put a piece on your tongue of ____skunk cabage___ you will see
              but I've ate it,
              thats why I call green dragon fiber glass berries.


              while Im on the subect I was just reading about
              some one(who know's their stuff)
              who dryed it, and it still had trace amounts.

              I have read on pfaf that 6 months it should be dryed for.
              (The topic I was reading was about coco flavor from the root,
              the guy that knew what HE was talking about said
              He thinks he needed to roast it, since he didn't have good sucess.
              with the coco flavor ,

              -- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Catherine Sweeney" <starwolfdreamer@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > When I was learning from an herbalist we went to collect mullien
              and she made sure I knew the differece between that and skunk
              cabbage. I was told it was highly toxic. So I would research to see
              if the toxicity would effect your mulch and plantings. Before putting
              a lot of work into it. It may be like deadly nightshade which has
              some health benifits but only if used correctly by someone who knows
              what they are doing. Caat
              >
              > All I've heard is that skunk cabbage is high in magnesium. I
              wouldn't assume that it is toxic.
              >
            • Hilary Robinson
              Plant material can be toxic to people and yet not be harmful in compost or mulches. Would you not put rhubarb leaves in your compost bin? Regards, Hilary
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 12 1:30 PM
                Plant material can be toxic to people and yet not be harmful in compost or mulches. Would you not put rhubarb leaves in your compost bin?
                Regards, Hilary (Cheshire)



                To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                From: manofpeace32@...
                Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2008 19:07:17 +0000
                Subject: [pfaf] Re: composting /skunk cabbage




















                -

                drying or cooking skunk cabage is the way to go.

                (I don't have experience wuiht it yet.



                It has a chemical called oxalate acid.

                I call It fiberglass(I don't know)

                (if you put a piece on your tongue of ____skunk cabage___ you will see

                but I've ate it,

                thats why I call green dragon fiber glass berries.



                while Im on the subect I was just reading about

                some one(who know's their stuff)

                who dryed it, and it still had trace amounts.



                I have read on pfaf that 6 months it should be dryed for.

                (The topic I was reading was about coco flavor from the root,

                the guy that knew what HE was talking about said

                He thinks he needed to roast it, since he didn't have good sucess.

                with the coco flavor ,



                -- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Catherine Sweeney" <starwolfdreamer@...>

                wrote:

                >

                > When I was learning from an herbalist we went to collect mullien

                and she made sure I knew the differece between that and skunk

                cabbage. I was told it was highly toxic. So I would research to see

                if the toxicity would effect your mulch and plantings. Before putting

                a lot of work into it. It may be like deadly nightshade which has

                some health benifits but only if used correctly by someone who knows

                what they are doing. Caat

                >

                > All I've heard is that skunk cabbage is high in magnesium. I

                wouldn't assume that it is toxic.

                >

























                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • ossi
                Hi, Just a note, that soluble oxalic acid of rhubarb and insoluble calcium oxalate crystals of water arum, taro and other plants of araceae family are
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 12 4:06 PM
                  Hi,

                  Just a note, that soluble oxalic acid of rhubarb and insoluble calcium
                  oxalate crystals of water arum, taro and other plants of araceae family
                  are different in the way they are poisonous to humans.

                  Irritation caused by calcium oxalate present in plants can be increased
                  due to proteolytic enzymes, which surround the crystals. In case of water
                  arum, there are also other poisonous substances present which are not as
                  far as I know fully chemically identified, but include aroine alkaloid
                  (which resembles konine of hemlock), saponins and prussic acid.

                  Traditional treatment for water arum roots in Fennoscandia is through
                  careful preparation by cutting them into small pieces, boiling them (for
                  half an hour), leaving them to dry for a few days and then grinding into a
                  powder, which was used in baking (traditional baking meant usually
                  fermented sour dough)... I wonder is it that cooking and discarding the
                  water gets rid of the other toxic substances, but drying (and
                  fermentation) is needed to remove rest of the oxalates ?

                  ossi (fennoscandia)

                  > Plant material can be toxic to people and yet not be harmful in compost or
                  > mulches. Would you not put rhubarb leaves in your compost bin?
                  > Regards, Hilary (Cheshire)
                  >
                  > From: manofpeace32@...
                  > Subject: [pfaf] Re: composting /skunk cabbage
                  >
                  > drying or cooking skunk cabage is the way to go.
                  >
                  > (I don't have experience wuiht it yet.
                  >
                  > It has a chemical called oxalate acid.
                  >
                  > while Im on the subect I was just reading about
                  >
                  > some one(who know's their stuff)
                  >
                  > who dryed it, and it still had trace amounts.
                  >
                  > I have read on pfaf that 6 months it should be dryed for.
                  >
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