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Re: Lotus edulis

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  • v.scherrer
    Thanks a lot! This should help. Although I m pretty well off with nitrogen fixing shrubs, but this plant sounds just so irresistibly desirable - tolerant of
    Message 1 of 26 , Aug 5 2:16 AM
      Thanks a lot! This should help.
      Although I'm pretty well off with nitrogen fixing shrubs, but this
      plant sounds just so irresistibly desirable - tolerant of drought, of
      acid and poor soil - I've got more than I could wish for of that - and
      a size which is not likely to demand any effort - definitely a must
      have for my collection. Though it may not fruit due to low chill
      winters, but I wouldn't expect it suffer otherwise from lack of cold.

      Re rhyzobia, I read once that such plants may nodulate anyway, but
      that one can tell whether they are actually fixing nitrogen, if the
      nodules are brownish inside, rather than white.
      According to some sources of information, even within the family of
      the Fabaceae, there are many different species or genera which require
      different rhyzobia.


      --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "sjalge" <sjalge@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > > http://ecocrop.fao.org/ecocrop/srv/en/dataSheet?id=7412
      > >
      > > For a comparison with the asparagus pea see:
      > >
      > > http://ecocrop.fao.org/ecocrop/srv/en/dataSheet?id=1807
      >
      > vital - Great links! For acid soil (if it is also sandy/rocky) and if
      > you live somewhere cool enough you might consider Comptonia peregrina.
      > It makes great tea, fixes nitrogen (symbiotically of course) and it
      > is clonal so it will spread without having to seed. The Fabaceae form
      > symbioses with rhyzobia which are common in many soils, so I would be
      > surprised if the lack of their symbiont was the reason for the species
      > failing. The way to be more confident in that assessment is to dig
      > them up and see if the roots are nodulating. If they are then they
      > have most likely found the rhyzobia and are failing due to other
      > causes. Hope this helps.
      >
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