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Is amaranthus retroflexus edible?

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  • renugac
    Hello everybody.... I have a weed spreading quite well all over my backyard...once I bought a bunch of spinich kind of leaves from an Indian store and it
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 30, 2008
      Hello everybody....

      I have a weed spreading quite well all over my backyard...once I
      bought a bunch of spinich kind of leaves from an Indian store and it
      looked exactly like the weed in my backyard. I searched on the
      internet and found it to be "Amaranthus retroflexus" It has tiny black
      seeds. To make it short... have anyone heard about this? Is it edible?
      I dont use any fertilizers in my backyard. One more question....I
      would like to decorate my front porch in the winter with some winter
      plants that would tolerate extreme cold conditions while it is snowing
      outside...any suggestions please?Thanks
      -Renuga
    • Teeter
      Hello, I buy the amaranth seeds and am currently growing the amaranth for the leaves to eat. They can be cooked like spinach but are more healthy. Theresa ...
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 31, 2008
        Hello, I buy the amaranth seeds and am currently growing the amaranth for
        the leaves to eat. They can be cooked like spinach but are more healthy.

        Theresa

        On Wed, Jul 30, 2008 at 8:34 AM, renugac <renugac@...> wrote:

        > Hello everybody....
        >
        > I have a weed spreading quite well all over my backyard...once I
        > bought a bunch of spinich kind of leaves from an Indian store and it
        > looked exactly like the weed in my backyard. I searched on the
        > internet and found it to be "Amaranthus retroflexus" It has tiny black
        > seeds. To make it short... have anyone heard about this? Is it edible?
        > I dont use any fertilizers in my backyard. One more question....I
        > would like to decorate my front porch in the winter with some winter
        > plants that would tolerate extreme cold conditions while it is snowing
        > outside...any suggestions please?Thanks
        > -Renuga
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Torrens (lists)
        In article , ... http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Amaranthus+retroflexus As a group, most amaranths are edible . Some are
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 31, 2008
          In article <g6pn4e+4408@...>,
          renugac <renugac@...> wrote:
          > Hello everybody....

          > I have a weed spreading quite well all over my backyard...once I
          > bought a bunch of spinich kind of leaves from an Indian store and it
          > looked exactly like the weed in my backyard. I searched on the
          > internet and found it to be "Amaranthus retroflexus" It has tiny black
          > seeds. To make it short... have anyone heard about this? Is it edible?
          > I dont use any fertilizers in my backyard. One more question....I
          > would like to decorate my front porch in the winter with some winter
          > plants that would tolerate extreme cold conditions while it is snowing
          > outside...any suggestions please?Thanks
          > -Renuga

          http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Amaranthus+retroflexus

          As a group, most amaranths are 'edible'. Some are grown as cattle fodder
          commonly in France. Some are sold for use as baby leaf salad.

          --
          Richard Torrens, Cambridgeshire, England - Food For Free
          WWW site : http://www.Torrens.org.uk/FFF/
        • Geir Flatabø
          from www.pfaf.org : Edible Uses Edible Parts: Leaves ; Seed
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 31, 2008
            from www.pfaf.org :

            Edible Uses

            Edible Parts: Leaves<http://www.pfaf.org/database/search_use.php?K[]=Leaves>;
            Seed <http://www.pfaf.org/database/search_use.php?K[]=Seed>.

            Young leaves - raw or cooked as a spinach[2, 5, 62, 85, 159]. A mild
            flavour, it is often mixed with stronger flavoured leaves[183]. Very rich in
            iron, it is also a good source of vitamins A and C[201]. Seed - raw or
            cooked[2, 46, 61, 85]. Ground into a powder and used as a cereal
            substitute[5], it can also be sprouted and added to salads. The seed is very
            small, about 1mm in diameter[266], but easy to harvest and very nutritious.
            The flavour is greatly improved by roasting the seed before grinding
            it[183]. It is often added to maize meal[183]. The seed can be cooked whole,
            and becomes very gelatinous like this, but it is rather difficult to crush
            all of the small seeds in the mouth and thus some of the seed will pass
            right through the digestive system without being assimilated[K].

            Geir Flatabø


            2008/7/30 renugac <renugac@...>

            > Hello everybody....
            >
            > I have a weed spreading quite well all over my backyard...once I
            > bought a bunch of spinich kind of leaves from an Indian store and it
            > looked exactly like the weed in my backyard. I searched on the
            > internet and found it to be "Amaranthus retroflexus" It has tiny black
            > seeds. To make it short... have anyone heard about this? Is it edible?
            > I dont use any fertilizers in my backyard. One more question....I
            > would like to decorate my front porch in the winter with some winter
            > plants that would tolerate extreme cold conditions while it is snowing
            > outside...any suggestions please?Thanks
            > -Renuga
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Infowolf1@aol.com
            the seeds were eaten by the Aztec and are one of the few plants that are chemically equivalent to meat. In a message dated 8/3/2008 2:01:03 P.M. Pacific
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 3, 2008
              the seeds were eaten by the Aztec and are one of the few
              plants that are chemically equivalent to meat.


              In a message dated 8/3/2008 2:01:03 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
              brewertreesa@... writes:




              Hello, I buy the amaranth seeds and am currently growing the amaranth for
              the leaves to eat. They can be cooked like spinach but are more healthy.

              Theresa

              On Wed, Jul 30, 2008 at 8:34 AM, renugac <_renugac@..._
              (mailto:renugac@...) > wrote:

              > Hello everybody...
              >
              > I have a weed spreading quite well all over my backyard...once I
              > bought a bunch of spinich kind of leaves from an Indian store and it
              > looked exactly like the weed in my backyard. I searched on the
              > internet and found it to be "Amaranthus retroflexus" It has tiny black
              > seeds. To make it short... have anyone heard about this? Is it edible?
              > I dont use any fertilizers in my backyard. One more question....
              > would like to decorate my front porch in the winter with some winter
              > plants that would tolerate extreme cold conditions while it is snowing
              > outside...any suggestions please?Thanks
              > -Renuga
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







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