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Re: Do you know it folks?

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  • v.scherrer
    Olá again, For those who didn t check out the Wikipedia link(s) I can only add the following (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_hip): Rose hips of some
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 24, 2008
      Olá again,

      For those who didn't check out the Wikipedia link(s) I can only add
      the following (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_hip):

      "Rose hips of some species, especially Rosa canina (Dog Rose) and R.
      majalis, have been used as a source of Vitamin C."

      Apparently a quite obvious problem with the generalisation of
      nutritional contents in fruits is that these vary significantly
      depending on their maturity level, the variety, whether the seeds and
      the skins are included, or just the juice, as well as the amount of
      light they received, the conditions of the climate and soil, including
      whether they grew wild or with which method they were cultivated and
      with which substances they were treated.
      Thus any such information, be it in Wikipedia or wherever, is most
      unlikely to be all correct, and needs to be classified with this in mind.
      This is likely to be much less a concern with seeds, especially dried
      ones, as there are considerably less variables.

      Cheerios

      Vital



      --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Geir Flatabø" <geirf@...> wrote:
      >
      > "Rose Hip" is not a species,
      > different rose hips contain different amounts of Vitamin C, Rosa
      rugosa, e
      > g does not contain too much Vitamin C,
      > and the measurements probably have not measured the contetn
      including tha
      > seeds / kernels..
      > The measures I have seen is max 1 % Vitamin C, and that is less than
      > Acerola...
      >
      > Geir Flatabø
      >
      >
      > 2008/7/22 v.scherrer <vital233@...>:
      >
      > > Dear Dr. Chiranjit Parmar and all,
      > >
      > > I'm afraid that this week's interesting fruit fact in Fruitipedia is
      > > outdated.
      > > See:
      > >
      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_C#Plant_sources
      > >
      > > where it reads that the Kakadu plum (currently the fruit with the
      > > highest levels of vitamin C ever measured) has nearly twice as much
      > > vitamin C as the Acerola, and that the latter ranks in fourth place
      > > behind Camu Camu (second) and Rose hip.
      > >
      > > Another interesting fruit fact may be the following
      > > (www.ncmuscadine.org/healthfacts.html):
      > >
      > > "Brunswick Biomedical Laboratories of Wareham, Massachusetts stated in
      > > 2003 that NutraGrape's Muscadine Grape Seed has the highest ORAC
      > > (Oxygen Radical Absorbing Capacity) of any natural substance they have
      > > yet to test."
      > >
      > > and (www.gfb.org/gfbnews/archives/2006/august_06/august2.htm):
      > >
      > > "... Recent research shows muscadine grape seeds and skins contain the
      > > highest levels of antioxidants and ellagic acids of any fruit
      tested ..."
      > >
      > > O.K. it's not exactly the whole fruit, but apparently the whole berry
      > > still may have the highest antioxidant levels of any whole fruit.
      > >
      > > Cheerios
      > >
      > > Vital
      > >
      > >
      > > 2000 BC--Here, eat this root.
      > > 1000 AD--That root is heathen; here, say this prayer.
      > > 1700 AD--That prayer is superstition. Here, drink this potion.
      > > 1900 AD--That potion is snake oil. Here, swallow this pill.
      > > 1985 AD--That pill is ineffective. Here, take this antibiotic.
      > > 2000 AD--That antibiotic doesn't work anymore. Here, eat this root.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > - In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Dr. Chiranjit Parmar" <parmarch_mnd@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Dear All,
      > > >
      > > > Do you know which cultivated fruit has the highest vitamin C
      content?
      > > >
      > > > If not, see this week's interesting fruit fact in Fruitipedia.
      > > >
      > > > Dr. Chiranjit Parmar
      > > > www.fruitipedia.com
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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