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Re: [pfaf] leaf miners

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  • Pat Meadows
    ... I m in the USA, not the UK but I m having a real struggle with leaf miners this year as well. I grow a lot of Swiss chard and they have really devastated
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 11, 2008
      On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 13:34:39 +0100, you wrote:

      >Hi all,
      > Has anyone else noticed an invasion of leaf miners in the UK? My beetroot is infested, but I notice also lots of other plants in the garden have them, and I thought they were specific to particular plants. I have them on Snowberry leaves, nasturtium and now I have discovered them on ox eye daisy and marguerite, same family. Since the grubs are between the plant tissues, they don't respond to the only safe pesticide that I am willing to use. My beetroot has gone for a burton this year but I would like to know an eco friendly way of stopping this pest, if anyone knows of one.

      I'm in the USA, not the UK but I'm having a real struggle with leaf miners
      this year as well. I grow a lot of Swiss chard and they have really
      devastated it. I also grow beets, and would like to eat the beet greens
      too.

      I'm replanting the Swiss chard, and I will cover it with floating row cover
      as soon as I've planted the seeds. (I think the UK calls floating row
      cover 'fleece'??) That's the only way I know to cope with them.

      Anyway, here's an example of floating row cover:

      http://www.gardensalive.com/product.asp?pn=2001

      I put hoops over the plants, then fasten the row cover to the hoops. You're
      supposed to be able to put the row cover directly on the plants, but I find
      that just encourages mold and fungus, and the plants don't grow well
      either.

      It's really a nuisance to have to do this. But I suppose it cannot be
      helped.

      I have not noticed their tracks on any other plants.

      Pat
      --
      Northern Pennsylvania

      CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
      http://www.thehungersite.com/
    • Mary Lloyd
      Thanks Pat, I was wondering if leaf miners attack things like Garlic or anything else with a strong odour: if they don t, perhaps we could disuade the flies
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 12, 2008
        Thanks Pat,
        I was wondering if leaf miners attack things like Garlic or anything else with a strong odour: if they don't, perhaps we could disuade the flies from laying their eggs by spraying the plants with garlic juice or something, prevention being better than cure.
        The wee beasties are well protected once they have invaded plant tissue, except against systemic insecticide which I don't want to use, obviously.
        Sorry to hear you have had problems with it too. The fleece looks good, but a bit of a hassle as you say. If I discover any other way to get rid of the problem I will let you know.
        Love, Whinnie
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Pat Meadows
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, July 11, 2008 4:58 PM
        Subject: Re: [pfaf] leaf miners


        On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 13:34:39 +0100, you wrote:

        >Hi all,
        > Has anyone else noticed an invasion of leaf miners in the UK? My beetroot is infested, but I notice also lots of other plants in the garden have them, and I thought they were specific to particular plants. I have them on Snowberry leaves, nasturtium and now I have discovered them on ox eye daisy and marguerite, same family. Since the grubs are between the plant tissues, they don't respond to the only safe pesticide that I am willing to use. My beetroot has gone for a burton this year but I would like to know an eco friendly way of stopping this pest, if anyone knows of one.

        I'm in the USA, not the UK but I'm having a real struggle with leaf miners
        this year as well. I grow a lot of Swiss chard and they have really
        devastated it. I also grow beets, and would like to eat the beet greens
        too.

        I'm replanting the Swiss chard, and I will cover it with floating row cover
        as soon as I've planted the seeds. (I think the UK calls floating row
        cover 'fleece'??) That's the only way I know to cope with them.

        Anyway, here's an example of floating row cover:

        http://www.gardensalive.com/product.asp?pn=2001

        I put hoops over the plants, then fasten the row cover to the hoops. You're
        supposed to be able to put the row cover directly on the plants, but I find
        that just encourages mold and fungus, and the plants don't grow well
        either.

        It's really a nuisance to have to do this. But I suppose it cannot be
        helped.

        I have not noticed their tracks on any other plants.

        Pat
        --
        Northern Pennsylvania

        CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
        http://www.thehungersite.com/




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Pat Meadows
        ... Yes, we could try it; in fact, it s a good idea. We would presumably have to re-spray after each rain. The only things they have attacked here have been
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 13, 2008
          On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 16:51:29 +0100, you wrote:

          >Thanks Pat,
          > I was wondering if leaf miners attack things like Garlic or anything else with a strong odour: if they don't, perhaps we could disuade the flies from laying their eggs by spraying the plants with garlic juice or something, prevention being better than cure.

          Yes, we could try it; in fact, it's a good idea. We would presumably have
          to re-spray after each rain.

          The only things they have attacked here have been my chard and beets. But
          they sure are merciless on those two plants.

          Yes, if I find anything that works, I'll let you know.

          Cheers,
          Pat
          --
          Northern Pennsylvania

          CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
          http://www.thehungersite.com/
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