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Re: [pfaf] hypericum flowers - are they edible?

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  • ossi
    ho, i have eaten some flowers of hypericum maculatum, but think one shouldn t eat em in summertime as the whole plant makes eyes very sensitive to light (and
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 5, 2008
      ho,

      i have eaten some flowers of hypericum maculatum, but think one shouldn't
      eat 'em in summertime as the whole plant makes eyes very sensitive to
      light (and that's why hypericum sp. are great here in the dark months of
      mid winter) ... but regular continuous consumption results one to
      hallucinate. I'm not sure what causes that. At least species native here
      in fennoscandia have purple liquid in the flowers and are are useful as a
      dye. i would be cautious to eat them in quantity.

      ossi

      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_of_Sharon
      > "Different scholars have suggested that the biblical "Rose of Sharon" may
      > be one of the following plants:
      > * A "kind of crocus" ("Sharon", Harper's Bible Dictionary) or a "crocus
      > that grows in the coastal plain of Sharon" (New Oxford Annotated Bible);
      > * Tulipa montana, "a bright red tulip-like flower . . . today prolific in
      > the hills of Sharon" ("rose", Harper's Bible Dictionary);
      > * Tulipa agenensis, the Sharon tulip, a species of tulip suggested by a
      > few botanists; or
      > * Lilium candidum, more commonly known as the Madonna lily, a species of
      > lily suggested by some botanists, though likely in reference to the "lily
      > of the valleys" mentioned in the second part of Song of Solomon 2.1."
      > "Today, the name is also commonly applied to two different plants, neither
      > of which is likely to have been the plant from the Bible:
      > * Hypericum calycinum, an evergreen flowering shrub native to southeast
      > Europe and southwest Asia, and the plant generally referred to in British
      > and Australian English as "Rose of Sharon"; and
      > * Hibiscus syriacus, a deciduous flowering shrub native to east Asia, the
      > plant generally referred to in American English as "Rose of Sharon" and
      > the national flower of South Korea. The flower's name in Korean is
      > mugunghwa"
      > More information about Rose of Sharon an other edible flowers:
      > http://oldfashionedliving.com/edibleflowers.html
      > Hibiscus and Rose of Sharon are mentioned as 2 differant flowers
      >
      > ----- Original Message ----
      > From: mikeandgem <harrisgemma@...>
      > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Saturday, July 5, 2008 4:19:22 PM
      > Subject: [pfaf] hypericum flowers - are they edible?
      >
      >
      > i just read a leaflet that said rose of sharon flowers are edible, but
      > it doesnt say much about it on the pfaf database. i always think of
      > this as hypericum, but perhaps they mean a different plant. does anyone
      > know about the edibility of hypericum flowers in general?
      > thanks,
      > gemma
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
    • Hilary Robinson
      Fascinating web page you ve mentioned (see below) but what on earth are Johnny Jump Ups ?? Regards, Hilary (in Cheshire)
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 6, 2008
        Fascinating web page you've mentioned (see below) but what on earth
        are "Johnny Jump Ups"??

        Regards, Hilary (in Cheshire)

        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, daniel wildman <spiderman18102@...> wrote:
        >
        > More information about Rose of Sharon an other edible flowers:
        > http://oldfashionedliving.com/edibleflowers.html
        > Hibiscus and Rose of Sharon are mentioned as 2 differant flowers
        >
      • Pat Meadows
        ... Maybe you know them as violas ; they are _Viola cornuta_ . Or maybe _Viola tricolor_. (It s unclear to me which name is correct.) They are a relative of
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 6, 2008
          On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 07:51:00 -0000, you wrote:

          >Fascinating web page you've mentioned (see below) but what on earth
          >are "Johnny Jump Ups"??
          >

          Maybe you know them as 'violas'; they are _Viola cornuta_ . Or maybe
          _Viola tricolor_. (It's unclear to me which name is correct.)

          They are a relative of pansies and of violets. Or maybe all three are the
          same species?

          Nice photo: http://tinyurl.com/5wmfdb

          Pat
          --
          Northern Pennsylvania

          CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
          http://www.thehungersite.com/
        • Hilary Robinson
          Looking at the photo, I think these are what we would just call violas in the UK. There are various named varieties, and they tend to cross and seed
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 6, 2008
            Looking at the photo, I think these are what we would just call
            "violas" in the UK. There are various named varieties, and they tend
            to cross and seed themselves, and yes, the flowers are great to eat.
            V tricolor is the wild flower called Heartsease here, and V cornuta is
            another kind of garden viola here, Horned Violet, which is more of a
            rock-garden perennial.
            Regards, Hilary (Cheshire)

            --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Pat Meadows <pat@...> wrote:
            >
            > On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 07:51:00 -0000, you wrote:
            >
            > >Fascinating web page you've mentioned (see below) but what on earth
            > >are "Johnny Jump Ups"??
            > >
            >
            > Maybe you know them as 'violas'; they are _Viola cornuta_ . Or maybe
            > _Viola tricolor_. (It's unclear to me which name is correct.)
            >
            > They are a relative of pansies and of violets. Or maybe all three
            are the
            > same species?
            >
            > Nice photo: http://tinyurl.com/5wmfdb
            >
            > Pat
            > --
            > Northern Pennsylvania
            >
            > CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
            > http://www.thehungersite.com/
            >
          • daniel wildman
            Hi Hilary: In another post you asked what on earth are Johnny Jump Ups ?? Here in PA/US it is one of the first flowering plant to jump up in Spring,
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 6, 2008
              Hi Hilary: In another post you asked "what on earth are "Johnny Jump Ups"?? Here in PA/US it is one of the first flowering plant to "jump up" in Spring, But " It has been introduced into North America,"
              For more infromation about "Jonny Jump Ups" for (Medical use):
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viola_tricolor
              "Heartsease (Viola tricolor) is a common European wild flower, growing as an annual or short-lived perennial. It has been introduced into North America, where it has spread widely, and is known as the Johnny Jump Up (though this name is also applied to similar species such as the Yellow Pansy). It is the progenitor of the cultivated Pansy, and is therefore sometimes called Wild Pansy; before the cultivated Pansies were developed, "Pansy" was an alternative name for the wild form."
              "As its name implies, Heartsease has a long history of use in herbalism. It has been recommended, among other uses, as a treatment for epilepsy, asthma, skin diseases and eczema. It has expectorant properties, and so has been used in the treatment of chest complaints such as bronchitis and whooping cough. It is also a diuretic, leading to its use in treating rheumatism and cystitis."




              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Hilary Robinson <hilrobinson@...>
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, July 6, 2008 5:03:58 PM
              Subject: [pfaf] Re: hypericum flowers - are they edible?


              Looking at the photo, I think these are what we would just call
              "violas" in the UK. There are various named varieties, and they tend
              to cross and seed themselves, and yes, the flowers are great to eat.
              V tricolor is the wild flower called Heartsease here, and V cornuta is
              another kind of garden viola here, Horned Violet, which is more of a
              rock-garden perennial.
              Regards, Hilary (Cheshire)

              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups. com, Pat Meadows <pat@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 07:51:00 -0000, you wrote:
              >
              > >Fascinating web page you've mentioned (see below) but what on earth
              > >are "Johnny Jump Ups"??
              > >
              >
              > Maybe you know them as 'violas'; they are _Viola cornuta_ . Or maybe
              > _Viola tricolor_. (It's unclear to me which name is correct.)
              >
              > They are a relative of pansies and of violets. Or maybe all three
              are the
              > same species?
              >
              > Nice photo: http://tinyurl. com/5wmfdb
              >
              > Pat
              > --
              > Northern Pennsylvania
              >
              > CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
              > http://www.thehunge rsite.com/
              >



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