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re: Lycium barbarum

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  • Steve Sainsbury
    Hi Vital, Are you asking if Gojis will grow in cool climates? Or were you asking how many hours of sun they require? Geir seems to have answered the first one
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 30, 2008
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      Hi Vital,

      Are you asking if Gojis will grow in cool climates? Or were you asking how
      many hours of sun they require?
      Geir seems to have answered the first one (and since the berries are known
      as Himalayan Goji Berries) I'd say they're tolerant of cool climates. Also,
      for the record, they seemed to be going great here in Bermuda until the
      slugs got mine.

      As for the length of sulight hours, Tibet (where Gojis are grown for
      production) is a very sunny place. It apaprently gets as much as 3600 hours
      of sunlight a year - Lhasa is nicknamed the "sunlight city." One
      description states: "low temperature, long-day sunshine, strong sunlight,
      predictable rainfall (mostly) and thin air"...

      Hope that helped.. sorry no L. barbarum experts in my contact list - just
      Google search.

      Peace.

      Steve.


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    • Vital Scherrer
      Thanks Geir and Steve! ... So I guess that means, for one thing, that most berries usually ripen in a low heat summer/climate? Certainly the information that
      Message 2 of 4 , May 2 2:38 AM
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        Thanks Geir and Steve!

        Geir Flatabø wrote:
        > Lycium barbarum grows easily i Oslo area - Norway, also some Lycium chinensis variety. Some clones do not ripen the berries fully..

        So I guess that means, for one thing, that most berries usually ripen in a low heat summer/climate? Certainly the information that they are naturalized in Britain would confirm this supposition.

        The other question about the chill requirement remains, i.e. whether they need a relatively cold winter to produce a good crop of fruits.

        Steve, did you see the barbarum species bearing regularly abundant fruit on Bermuda?

        Apparently this species and the chinensis are similar and often confused. I would expect, as in China and Tibet the chinensis species is the common one that it is therefore more likely the one which is cultivated - as well as possibly more demanding as far as heat, chill and hours of sunshine may go. At least according to the Sunset Western Garden Book, the latter is not recommended for mild coastal locations - the former is unfortunately and oddly enough not even listed there. But then again, in the PFAF database it is also written that the chinensis species is "naturalized in Britain, especially by the sea". Obviously in some cases not even the use of scientific names can prevent confusions.

        Vital




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      • Steve Sainsbury
        Hi Vital, Nope, I m the only one I know who grows in Bermuda.. Let you know how it goes.. Peace, Steve [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 4 , May 2 8:11 PM
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          Hi Vital,

          Nope, I'm the only one I know who grows in Bermuda..
          Let you know how it goes..

          Peace,

          Steve


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        • Steve
          Hi Vital, Did you try germinating some of the seeds indoors? It might be helpful to have an artificially warm start early in the year. I just do mine right
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 18, 2009
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            Hi Vital,

            Did you try germinating some of the seeds indoors? It might be helpful to
            have an artificially warm start early in the year. I just do mine right on
            the window ledge.

            I must mention that I didn't come up with the method of
            soaking/hydro-sprouting the gojis on the mesh. That was the folks at the
            Goji vineyard.. they even send a piece of mesh in the envelope with their
            seeds.

            I'll take a photo of it, so you can see what I mean..
            Ok, so I took four photos.
            In the first is the envelope I got from the Fountain of Youth Goji Vineyard
            (in Iowa) with diverse informational material (germination, planting
            instructions, etc), the packet of seeds on the right, and the fine mesh
            plastic screen.
            In the photos titled "Goji sprouter 1, 2 & 3" you see the little dish I
            use and the way that the screen becomes wet, but still remains floating. I
            just sprinkle 10 or 20 seeds on the saturated mesh and leave it, refilling
            the dish as the water evaporates.

            I have also heard of people planting straight into soil, but I tried the
            water method first and it worked, so I've stuck with it.

            One thing which should be said is that Goji seeds lose more of their
            viability the longer they have been out of the fruit. Therefore two
            advantages of just buying a bag of dried berries from the store are 1) the
            seeds are still contained in their fruits, and 2) you get probably more
            seeds than you could ever use in one plot - even after eating some
            berries..
            The amount of seeds I got via mail were from about ten or twenty berries at
            the most (not more than a handful), whereas you'll get hundreds of berries
            in a bag for the same cost.

            Happy growing,

            Peace,

            Steve.





            On Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 9:48 AM, Vital Scherrer <vital233@...>wrote:

            > Hello Steve,
            >
            > Many thanks for these informations.
            > Your germination method sounds innovative. Did you also try to germinate
            > them in soil directly? Do you think that they might need to be surface sown,
            > so they get some light for their germination?
            > Anyway, I'll try again - could be that the temperatures here were too low
            > in February/March (somewhere between 50ºF and 60ºF) - I may give your method
            > a try as well.
            >
            > Best wishes
            >
            > Vital
            >
            >
            >
            > *PERMACULTURE **
            > living in consensual communion with a resilient nature
            > ** WAYS TO CREATE PARADISAIC ECOSYSTEMS*
            > ------------------------------
            > Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2009 19:21:51 -0300
            > Subject: Re: Lycium barbarum
            > From: permalove@...
            > To: vital233@...
            >
            >
            > Hello Vital,
            >
            > I do indeed grow my Goji plants from seed..
            >
            > I have one surviving second-year youngster I grew from seed that I got
            > through "The Fountain of Youth Goji Vineyard"
            > their address is:
            > 2478 State Hwy. 92
            > Winterset, Iowa 50273
            > USA
            >
            > tel. (515) 462 - 2352
            > gojiseed@...
            > www.fountainofyouth-gojiseed.com
            >
            > Check out the plants on this page of their site.
            > http://www.fountainofyouth-gojiseed.com/GojiPlants.html
            >
            > I have also grown (this year) several plants from seed scraped from fruits
            > I get in very expensive little bags at the grocery store. The largest of
            > that batch is about 3 months old and six inches high. I don't push the
            > fertilizer, just organic residues and natural derivatives, so they're slow
            > and steady. The slugs LOVE my gojis here, so I don't actually want
            > luxuriant growth.
            >
            > With both sources, I start the seed on a little piece of very fine art mesh
            > suspended on a cup of water (my mesh floats, but if yours sinks, you'll need
            > to keep it at the surface somehow - perhaps use a container with a smaller
            > diameter than the widest parts of the mesh and keep the cup filled.
            > Basically it's like sprouting. At any rate, they all pretty much go at the
            > same time, with a few stragglers.
            > The rootlets grow down into the water throught the mesh, and when the
            > seedlings are one to two inches above the mesh, I gently pull them out and
            > transplant them into soil. Keep the soil moist at first, and then gradually
            > back off when the seedlings really catch.
            >
            > Ok, my son's awake, so must go.. (photos later)
            >
            > Peace,
            >
            > Steve.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On Wed, Jun 17, 2009 at 1:54 PM, v.scherrer <vital233@...> wrote:
            >
            > Olá Steve,
            >
            > I just wanted to ask how your Lyciums are doing.
            > BTW I tried to grow them several times from seed of two different origins
            > without any success. Did you grow them from seed? If so, can you give me any
            > advice for their germination?
            > Cheerios
            > Vital
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > "The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force."
            >
            > - Thomas Jefferson
            >
            > ------------------------------
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            >



            --
            "The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force."

            - Thomas Jefferson


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