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Companion planting

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  • Traveler in Thyme
    Our gardens are not in rows at all, just areas you can walk between like paths thru the jungle. There are permanent trellises set up which rotate between
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 19, 2008
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      Our gardens are not in rows at all, just areas you can walk between like
      paths thru the jungle. There are permanent trellises set up which rotate
      between beans, tomatoes, and squash/cucumbers from season to season, with
      all the companion plants jumbled in between, surrounded by borders of
      perennials where they won't get stepped on.

      Last year, the growth was too rank and crowded so we had stink bugs and
      squash bugs, so this year I'm keeping the mulch thicker and the spacing a
      bit wider, but nothing is tidy or lined up.....there's a tomatoe plant here,
      another one over there, with beans in between the cucumbers and zucchini,
      marigolds, carrots and basil everywhere, peppers and heat-tender herbs on
      the shady side, and lovely weeds (oops, I mean wildflowers and native
      grasses) all around the outside borders.

      The back yard is even more of a jungle, with dead nettles, henbit, and other
      groundcovers shading the soil between rampant parsley, lambs quarters,
      borage, lemon balm, chives, safflowers, and dandelions. My husband mulches
      the front garden with leaves, but we just mow a narrow path thru the
      grouncovers in the back so you don't get wet ankles going from the kitchen
      door the the gate.

      Lots of strange plants came up in back this year, I'm researching their
      useful properties. Heliotrope, some sort of artemisia, three kinds of
      morning glory, wild grapes, and a big patch of poison ivy away at the back
      where it does no harm. Since I take Rhus Toxicondron for my arthritis,
      maybe I'll learn how to process poison ivy berries for another of my
      homegrown meds. The birds eat them with not harm, why not me?

      Does henbit have any uses?

      Marcia Cash
      ~Traveler in Thyme~


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rup Vij
      Dear Marcia Would be good to see some pictures of your gardens. Obviously you have the luxury of large amounts of space. Mine is a very small garden with
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 21, 2008
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        Dear Marcia

        Would be good to see some pictures of your gardens. Obviously you have the luxury of large amounts of space. Mine is a very small garden with very little space.

        Regarding your artemisia, I would be very interested in knowing which species you have. I am currently working with A. annu and looking for A. apiacea/cruifolia and eventually will be wanting to study all of them.

        Warm regards

        Rupi Vij

        Traveler in Thyme <marcia@...> wrote:
        Our gardens are not in rows at all, just areas you can walk between like
        paths thru the jungle. There are permanent trellises set up which rotate
        between beans, tomatoes, and squash/cucumbers from season to season, with
        all the companion plants jumbled in between, surrounded by borders of
        perennials where they won't get stepped on.

        Last year, the growth was too rank and crowded so we had stink bugs and
        squash bugs, so this year I'm keeping the mulch thicker and the spacing a
        bit wider, but nothing is tidy or lined up.....there's a tomatoe plant here,
        another one over there, with beans in between the cucumbers and zucchini,
        marigolds, carrots and basil everywhere, peppers and heat-tender herbs on
        the shady side, and lovely weeds (oops, I mean wildflowers and native
        grasses) all around the outside borders.

        The back yard is even more of a jungle, with dead nettles, henbit, and other
        groundcovers shading the soil between rampant parsley, lambs quarters,
        borage, lemon balm, chives, safflowers, and dandelions. My husband mulches
        the front garden with leaves, but we just mow a narrow path thru the
        grouncovers in the back so you don't get wet ankles going from the kitchen
        door the the gate.

        Lots of strange plants came up in back this year, I'm researching their
        useful properties. Heliotrope, some sort of artemisia, three kinds of
        morning glory, wild grapes, and a big patch of poison ivy away at the back
        where it does no harm. Since I take Rhus Toxicondron for my arthritis,
        maybe I'll learn how to process poison ivy berries for another of my
        homegrown meds. The birds eat them with not harm, why not me?

        Does henbit have any uses?

        Marcia Cash
        ~Traveler in Thyme~

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        ---------------------------------
        Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • fworldproject
        ... you have the luxury of large amounts of space. Mine is a very small garden with very little space. ... which species you have. I am currently working
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 21, 2008
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          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Rup Vij <rupivij@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear Marcia
          >
          > Would be good to see some pictures of your gardens. Obviously
          you have the luxury of large amounts of space. Mine is a very
          small garden with very little space.
          >
          > Regarding your artemisia, I would be very interested in knowing
          which species you have. I am currently working with A. annu and
          looking for A. apiacea/cruifolia and eventually will be wanting to
          study all of them.
          >
          > Warm regards
          >
          > Rupi Vij
          >
          Dear Marcia,
          I had in past used Artemisia Annua to treat malaria here in
          Africa, i got the idea fro Dr keith of ANAMED organisation in
          Germany , and it was agood experience helping kids who die of
          malaria everyday in Africa. Maybe step one would be knowing what
          species are available in your garden , then the next steps would be
          exploring on their uses.
          I loved your explanation and illustration of the rows and paths in
          your farm your farm should be agood one thanks.
          Evance odula
          > Traveler in Thyme <marcia@...> wrote:
          > Our gardens are not in rows at all, just areas you can
          walk between like
          > paths thru the jungle. There are permanent trellises set up which
          rotate
          > between beans, tomatoes, and squash/cucumbers from season to
          season, with
          > all the companion plants jumbled in between, surrounded by borders
          of
          > perennials where they won't get stepped on.
          >
          > Last year, the growth was too rank and crowded so we had stink
          bugs and
          > squash bugs, so this year I'm keeping the mulch thicker and the
          spacing a
          > bit wider, but nothing is tidy or lined up.....there's a tomatoe
          plant here,
          > another one over there, with beans in between the cucumbers and
          zucchini,
          > marigolds, carrots and basil everywhere, peppers and heat-tender
          herbs on
          > the shady side, and lovely weeds (oops, I mean wildflowers and
          native
          > grasses) all around the outside borders.
          >
          > The back yard is even more of a jungle, with dead nettles, henbit,
          and other
          > groundcovers shading the soil between rampant parsley, lambs
          quarters,
          > borage, lemon balm, chives, safflowers, and dandelions. My husband
          mulches
          > the front garden with leaves, but we just mow a narrow path thru
          the
          > grouncovers in the back so you don't get wet ankles going from the
          kitchen
          > door the the gate.
          >
          > Lots of strange plants came up in back this year, I'm researching
          their
          > useful properties. Heliotrope, some sort of artemisia, three kinds
          of
          > morning glory, wild grapes, and a big patch of poison ivy away at
          the back
          > where it does no harm. Since I take Rhus Toxicondron for my
          arthritis,
          > maybe I'll learn how to process poison ivy berries for another of
          my
          > homegrown meds. The birds eat them with not harm, why not me?
          >
          > Does henbit have any uses?
          >
          > Marcia Cash
          > ~Traveler in Thyme~
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo!
          Mobile. Try it now.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Traveler in Thyme
          I have no idea what this artemisia looking weed really is, maybe sweet annie ? It may be something else altogether, I have not found it in any weed nor
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 22, 2008
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            I have no idea what this artemisia looking weed really is, maybe "sweet
            annie"? It may be something else altogether, I have not found it in any
            weed nor wildflower books. Will try to get a pic, though it's already
            going to seed.

            Marcia Cash
            ~Traveler in Thyme~


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Rup Vij
            Dear Marcia I would be grateful if you could send me a picture, also if it is going to seed then I would love to have some of the seed to grow it myself. I
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 24, 2008
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              Dear Marcia

              I would be grateful if you could send me a picture, also if it is going to seed then I would love to have some of the seed to grow it myself. I need as many specimens of different artemisias as possible. Attached picture of sweet annie

              Thanks

              Rupi


              Traveler in Thyme <marcia@...> wrote:
              I have no idea what this artemisia looking weed really is, maybe "sweet
              annie"? It may be something else altogether, I have not found it in any
              weed nor wildflower books. Will try to get a pic, though it's already
              going to seed.

              Marcia Cash
              ~Traveler in Thyme~

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              ---------------------------------
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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