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Huckleberry question

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  • sue4698
    Hello everybody, I just sowed some huckleberry seeds (not well known in here in the UK) and I was looking forward to making lots of preserves later this
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 9, 2008
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      Hello everybody,

      I just sowed some huckleberry seeds (not well known in here in the UK)
      and I was looking forward to making lots of preserves later this
      year....that was until I looked them up on the PFAF database. It gives
      conflicting advice. It says they are edible and poisonous.

      Can anyone tell me whether they are safe to eat? The two varieties that
      I am growing are Solanum nigrum and Solanum melanocerasum.

      Sue
    • Geir Flatabø
      I have been eating S. nigrum wild provenience - for years , - I like them, no observation on ill efects. Also tried seeds from S. burbanckii - looked nearly
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 10, 2008
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        I have been eating S. nigrum wild provenience - "for years",

        - I like them, no observation on ill efects.
        Also tried seeds from S. burbanckii - looked nearly identical to my
        S. nigrum, but ripening at least 1 month later, and not any larger
        berries, same taste, so no reason for me to prefer the burbanckii
        selection...

        By the way anyone got seeds from the real american Huckleberries -
        Gaylussacia`s ???

        Geir Flatabø

        Norway

        2008/4/9, sue4698 <sue@...>:
        > Hello everybody,
        >
        > I just sowed some huckleberry seeds (not well known in here in the UK)
        > and I was looking forward to making lots of preserves later this
        > year....that was until I looked them up on the PFAF database. It gives
        > conflicting advice. It says they are edible and poisonous.
        >
        > Can anyone tell me whether they are safe to eat? The two varieties that
        > I am growing are Solanum nigrum and Solanum melanocerasum.
        >
        > Sue
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Vikas Malik
        Hey, I have also been eating the Solanum nigrum since childhood. They are delicious. Are they poisonous, I am still here. But that is just S. nigrum, I can say
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 10, 2008
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          Hey, I have also been eating the Solanum nigrum since childhood. They are delicious. Are they poisonous, I am still here. But that is just S. nigrum, I can say for sure. See other sources for that.

          Vikas
          India.

          On Thu, 10 Apr 2008 Geir Flatabø wrote :
          >I have been eating S. nigrum wild provenience - "for years",
          >
          >- I like them, no observation on ill efects.
          >Also tried seeds from S. burbanckii - looked nearly identical to my
          >S. nigrum, but ripening at least 1 month later, and not any larger
          >berries, same taste, so no reason for me to prefer the burbanckii
          >selection...
          >
          >By the way anyone got seeds from the real american Huckleberries -
          >Gaylussacia`s ???
          >
          >Geir Flatabø
          >
          >Norway
          >
          >2008/4/9, sue4698 <sue@...>:
          > > Hello everybody,
          > >
          > > I just sowed some huckleberry seeds (not well known in here in the UK)
          > > and I was looking forward to making lots of preserves later this
          > > year....that was until I looked them up on the PFAF database. It gives
          > > conflicting advice. It says they are edible and poisonous.
          > >
          > > Can anyone tell me whether they are safe to eat? The two varieties that
          > > I am growing are Solanum nigrum and Solanum melanocerasum.
          > >
          > > Sue
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >


          Vikas Malik,Ph.D.
          318 W 12th Ave,
          Room 274, Aronoff Laboratory,
          Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology,
          Ohio State University, Columbus OH 43210


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Steve Sainsbury
          Hi Sue, I don t know Huckleberries very well, but I can say that Solanaceae is often listed as both poisonous and edible due to the often toxic foliage and the
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 11, 2008
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            Hi Sue,

            I don't know Huckleberries very well, but I can say that Solanaceae is often
            listed as both poisonous and edible due to the often toxic foliage and the
            sometimes edible fruits - exceptions include the poisonous nightshade fruits
            (Belladonna, etc); don't eat those.
            There seems to be agreement on the idea that "The unripe fruit contains the
            highest concentration of toxins."

            Peace,

            Steve.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • sue4698
            ... Thanks Steve - and to everyone else that responded. This makes sense to me now - I am no longer confused! Sue ... is often ... and the ... nightshade
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 11, 2008
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              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Sainsbury" <permalove@...> wrote:
              >
              Thanks Steve - and to everyone else that responded. This makes sense
              to me now - I am no longer confused!

              Sue

              > Hi Sue,
              >
              > I don't know Huckleberries very well, but I can say that Solanaceae
              is often
              > listed as both poisonous and edible due to the often toxic foliage
              and the
              > sometimes edible fruits - exceptions include the poisonous
              nightshade fruits
              > (Belladonna, etc); don't eat those.
              > There seems to be agreement on the idea that "The unripe fruit
              contains the
              > highest concentration of toxins."
              >
              > Peace,
              >
              > Steve.
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Travis Philp
              Hi Sue. I m no authority on the subject but I believe they are about as poisonous as tomatoes. Both plants are in the same family and contain the same toxin in
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 11, 2008
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                Hi Sue. I'm no authority on the subject but I believe they are about as poisonous as tomatoes. Both plants are in the same family and contain the same toxin in small amounts. Most plant foods have some amount of toxin in them as a defence mechanism to try and ward off those who would try to eat them. Huckleberry is sold here in Canada as an edible in local markets, and by seed suppliers as an edible, which leads me to believe it is safe.

                Travis

                -----Original Message-----
                From: "sue4698" <sue@...>
                To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wed, 09 Apr 2008 21:08:26 -0000
                Subject: [pfaf] Huckleberry question

                Hello everybody,

                I just sowed some huckleberry seeds (not well known in here in the UK)
                and I was looking forward to making lots of preserves later this
                year....that was until I looked them up on the PFAF database. It gives
                conflicting advice. It says they are edible and poisonous.

                Can anyone tell me whether they are safe to eat? The two varieties that
                I am growing are Solanum nigrum and Solanum melanocerasum.

                Sue
              • Pat Meadows
                ... The word huckleberry is also, I believe, used for an entirely different fruit. Pat -- Northern Pennsylvania http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com/
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 12, 2008
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                  On Fri, 11 Apr 2008 17:50:45 -0400, you wrote:

                  >Hi Sue. I'm no authority on the subject but I believe they are about as poisonous as tomatoes. Both plants are in the same family and contain the same toxin in small amounts. Most plant foods have some amount of toxin in them as a defence mechanism to try and ward off those who would try to eat them. Huckleberry is sold here in Canada as an edible in local markets, and by seed suppliers as an edible, which leads me to believe it is safe.
                  >

                  The word 'huckleberry' is also, I believe, used for an entirely different
                  fruit.

                  Pat
                  -- Northern Pennsylvania
                  http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com/
                  'Every one of us can do something to protect and care for our planet.
                  We should live in such a way that makes a future possible.'
                  - Thich Nhat Hanh
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