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Re: Anybody Using Commercial Hydro/Aero-ponic Systems?

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  • Traveler in Thyme
    Personally, I am wary of using any growing system that depends on electricity...........one power failure and you are out of business. Plus, since we are all
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 7, 2008
      Personally, I am wary of using any growing system that depends on
      electricity...........one power failure and you are out of business. Plus,
      since we are all trying to cut back on high energy use, and not spend a lot
      of money on techno-gadgets in the organic style, I'll stick to digging in
      the dirt outdoors.

      Marcia Cash
      ~Traveler in Thyme~


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Martin Naylor
      Check these dudes out barrelponics@ yahoogroups.com Anybody using commercial hydro/aero-ponic systems? martin John Lennon describes his first acid trip
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 7, 2008
        Check these dudes out

        barrelponics@ yahoogroups.com

        Anybody using commercial hydro/aero-ponic systems?
        martin




        John Lennon describes his first acid trip
        http://www.youtube com/v/7IaPtrmGCH A

        martin



        ---------------------------------
        Get the name you always wanted with the new y7mail email address.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dan Culbertson
        Of course some of us have problems with good old dirt - like notorious-nematodes-from-hell and vicious-voracious-vandalizing-voles eating our sweet taters and
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 7, 2008
          Of course some of us have problems with good old dirt - like
          notorious-nematodes-from-hell and vicious-voracious-vandalizing-voles eating
          our sweet taters and such. There are a few hydroponics systems and
          quasi-hydroponics systems that do not use electricity. See ECHO's Technical
          Note on "Aboveground Gardens" available at
          http://www.echotech.org/mambo/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=89&Itemid=122 .
          The Shallow Bed garden and Shallow Pool garden are pretty close to
          hydroponics if not exactly pure -- and they are definitely not commercial
          systems.

          The Shallow Bed garden can even be made sans plastic on an impervious
          concrete slab or roof. Personally, with regard to the other post on
          avoiding plastics, I'm rather more concerned about plastics leaching nasty
          stuff into my food from the plastic linings in steel (tin) cans and from
          some plastic food containers than from what might go into the soil and
          thence into the food from plastic planting bins. In the soil I'm more
          concerned with what happens when so-called organic additives are used - like
          chemical-laden manures, blood meal, bone meal, cardboard, commercial hay and
          straw, etc. At least when I grow my own I don't have to worry about all
          that stuff getting into the produce *plus* what gets into it from cans, bags
          and boxes on the way from the processing plant to my table. Even most
          "organic" store-bought canned produce suffers from tin-can pollution! Guess
          we all pretty much choose our own poisons, so to speak. Maybe I'll find
          gardening paradise next year. :-)

          Dan

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Traveler in Thyme" <marcia@...>
          To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, March 07, 2008 13:39
          Subject: [pfaf] Re: Anybody Using Commercial Hydro/Aero-ponic Systems?


          > Personally, I am wary of using any growing system that depends on
          > electricity...........one power failure and you are out of business.
          > Plus,
          > since we are all trying to cut back on high energy use, and not spend a
          > lot
          > of money on techno-gadgets in the organic style, I'll stick to digging in
          > the dirt outdoors.
          >
          > Marcia Cash
          > ~Traveler in Thyme~
        • sustain_ability@123mail.org
          Thanks, Dan. That s the ticket, along with barrel hydroponics (I remember a commercial site for raising fish in a barrel, also) mentioned earlier. Locally, I
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 8, 2008
            Thanks, Dan. That's the ticket, along with barrel hydroponics (I
            remember a commercial site for raising fish in a barrel, also) mentioned
            earlier.

            Locally, I don't have any substantial amount of soil to play with. What
            there is, is saturated with root systems all fighting for survival in
            extremely rocky conditions, an average 60 day growing season between
            killer frosts, uncertain rainfall, foraging animals both tiny and huge
            and, of course, myself.

            Anybody with similar experience is asked to please contact me here or
            off list. My retirement is pending and I need to get a head start.

            Originally, I hoped aquaponics ( a
            "using-fish-waste-to-fertilize-plant-growth-to-feed-the-fish" cycle)
            would also feed people. The water volume used would also be useful in
            moderating temperatures inside a habitat or dwelling year-round. While
            that may or, in fact, has been proven successful on a huge scale (e.g.
            the size of a city block), the physical obstacles where I plan to live
            would likely require both resources and population density that won't
            exist in the near future.

            In my case, small is beautiful. Later, one can dream of using one's
            newly acquired experience to expand to several orders of magnitude and
            complexity.

            Best Wishes
            George
            http://transitions.stumbleupon.com


            On Fri, 7 Mar 2008 17:33:57 -0500, "Dan Culbertson"
            <danculb@...> said:
            > Of course some of us have problems with good old dirt - like
            > notorious-nematodes-from-hell and vicious-voracious-vandalizing-voles
            > eating
            > our sweet taters and such. There are a few hydroponics systems and
            > quasi-hydroponics systems that do not use electricity. See ECHO's
            > Technical
            > Note on "Aboveground Gardens" available at
            > http://www.echotech.org/mambo/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=89&Itemid=122
            >

            --
            http://www.fastmail.fm - Does exactly what it says on the tin
          • Dan Culbertson
            That is also a problem I face along with the soil critters. Most of my best possible garden sites are problematic with respect to tree roots and structures.
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 9, 2008
              That is also a problem I face along with the soil critters. Most of my best
              possible garden sites are problematic with respect to tree roots and
              structures. The ECHO shallow bed system, plastic barrier covered with a
              little mulch and debris and fertilized with 10-10-10 seems to work pretty
              good - just started one for taro. My best systems to date are basically
              container gardens made from 8 inch deep cement tubs raised to waist level on
              landscpe timbers and blocks. "Soil" for them is well-rotted compost and
              perlite with cypress sawdust initially fertilized with ozmocote and top
              dressed with 10-10-10 as needed later in the growing season. For deep
              rooted crops, like daikon radish and tomatoes, I put down a sheet of black
              plastic then a 4 foot diameter hoop of 3 foot tall, 2x4 welded wire mesh and
              line it with landscape fabric. That becomes a 2 cubic yard compost pile for
              about half a year or less then I plant veggies in it as an elevated planter.
              After a year or longer I use the compost from the hoop planters (well rotted
              muck by now) as the source of the compost for the cemenct tub gardens and
              also around my fruit trees and a few things that are happy in the tree roots
              like ginger. All the systems are drip irrigated and the runoff waters and
              fertilizes the fruit trees and things like bananas planted on the north side
              of the hoop planters. I don't use a recycling nutrient solution but I do
              try to make sure it is used at least twice to make sure all the nutrients
              are used up.

              Some day I will probably get one of those barrelponics systems going. I
              once had a lot of home-made conventional flood and drain hydroponic systems
              but the nutrient solution costs and electricity costs made the veggies
              rather expensive. Then a couple of power outages did in the crops one year.
              So, if I do any nutrient solution system now I think I'd use the one that
              gets the nutrients from fish pond effluent and the electricty from solar
              powered pumps. But the gadget cost on some of that high and my compost bin
              and tubs gardens are doing real well so I'm not in a hurry to add any more
              complexity just now. But gadgets are fun to play with ! (I'm a retired
              engineer and unrepentent gadget geek).

              Dan

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <sustain_ability@...>


              > Thanks, Dan. That's the ticket, along with barrel hydroponics (I
              > remember a commercial site for raising fish in a barrel, also) mentioned
              > earlier.
              >
              > Locally, I don't have any substantial amount of soil to play with. What
              > there is, is saturated with root systems all fighting for survival in
              > extremely rocky conditions, an average 60 day growing season between
              > killer frosts, uncertain rainfall, foraging animals both tiny and huge
              > and, of course, myself.
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