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Re: [pfaf] perennial vegetables

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  • Teeter
    http://www.agroforestry.net/pubs/perennial_vegetables.html http://garden.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Perennial_Foods These two links should get you a good perennial
    Message 1 of 22 , Feb 28, 2008
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      http://www.agroforestry.net/pubs/perennial_vegetables.html
      http://garden.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Perennial_Foods

      These two links should get you a good perennial garden going.





      On Thu, Feb 28, 2008 at 10:14 AM, Pat Meadows <pat@...> wrote:

      > On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 13:50:25 +0100, you wrote:
      >
      > >There is a book, I have not read, but which is very promising. It's
      > >"Perennial Vegetables" by Eric Toensmeier, who co-authored the famous
      > >"Edible Forest Gardens" book. See
      > >http://www.chelseagreen.com/2007/items/perennialvegetables for
      > >detailed information.
      >
      > I've read it, in fact I bought it. It is a terrific book, very very
      > helpful.
      >
      > I bought it on Amazon, where it is significantly cheaper.
      >
      > Pat
      > -- Northern Pennsylvania
      > http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com/
      > 'Every one of us can do something to protect and care for our planet.
      > We should live in such a way that makes a future possible.'
      > - Thich Nhat Hanh
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mary Lloyd
      Hi and thanks Michael and Julie... I am in Wales UK. Lots of rain and milder winters than in the E. of Britain. I didn t realize Good King Henry was a
      Message 2 of 22 , Feb 28, 2008
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        Hi and thanks Michael and Julie...
        I am in Wales UK. Lots of rain and milder winters than in the E. of
        Britain.
        I didn't realize Good King Henry was a perennial. Artichokes, great! Is
        the globe type easy to grow? I have grown the jerusalem ones: they are
        pretty and I like the taste of the tubers. However they do have that
        particular side effect, you know the one I mean......(smile)
        Love, Whinnie
        Michael Porter wrote:
        >
        > If you live far enough south I would have some sugestions for you,
        > --what Zone do you garden in? Michael Porter
        >
        > Julie Bruton-Seal <herbalist@...
        > <mailto:herbalist%40onetel.com>> wrote: How about artichokes? Both
        > globe and Jerusalem. And rhubarb, oca
        > (Oxalis tuberosa), Good King Henry, and salad burnet. Then there's
        > edible 'weeds' like dandelion and nettles, and other salad plants like
        > primrose. I'm sure there're lots more too.
        > Julie
        > On 25 Feb 2008, at 21:03, Mary Lloyd wrote:
        > >
        > > What I would like to grow in my garden is a collection of
        > > perennial vegetables. All I can think of so far are Asparagus and
        > > Seakale. If anyone has info about others, please pass it on.
        > > Love, Whinnie
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • Travis Philp
        Grapes (the leaves are tasty too!) Perennial Arugula aka sylvetta New Zealand Spinach Perennial Kale(Brassica oleracea L. var. ramosa) Sorrel Eastern
        Message 3 of 22 , Feb 28, 2008
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          Grapes (the leaves are tasty too!)
          Perennial Arugula aka sylvetta
          New Zealand Spinach
          Perennial Kale(Brassica oleracea L. var. ramosa)
          Sorrel
          Eastern Cottonwood (tree with edible leaves high in protein-very fast growing)
          Comfrey (new leaves only-some people say they're toxic to the liver in high amounts, others, even my petersons wild edibles field guide says that its safe to eat)


          ...hmmm I'm drawing a blank now.
          Thats all I can come up with


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Michael Porter <michaels4gardens@...>
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2008 03:22:39 -0800 (PST)
          Subject: Re: [pfaf] perennial vegetables

          If you live far enough south I would have some sugestions for you, --what Zone do you garden in? Michael Porter

          Julie Bruton-Seal <herbalist@...> wrote: How about artichokes? Both globe and Jerusalem. And rhubarb, oca
          (Oxalis tuberosa), Good King Henry, and salad burnet. Then there's
          edible 'weeds' like dandelion and nettles, and other salad plants like
          primrose. I'm sure there're lots more too.
          Julie
          On 25 Feb 2008, at 21:03, Mary Lloyd wrote:
          >
          > What I would like to grow in my garden is a collection of
          > perennial vegetables. All I can think of so far are Asparagus and
          > Seakale. If anyone has info about others, please pass it on.
          > Love, Whinnie

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Mary Lloyd
          Hi Stephen, Boris and all, Really useful responses, thank you very much. I am looking for a copy of that book Boris and looking up all the plants Stephen
          Message 4 of 22 , Feb 29, 2008
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            Hi Stephen, Boris and all,
            Really useful responses, thank you very much. I am looking for a copy of
            that book Boris and looking up all the plants Stephen listed below to
            see what grows near me or what I can get hold of to grow myself.
            There must be perennial plants that fall into all the recognized
            categories of vegetables: salads and greens, fruiting vegetables,
            shoots, stems, seeds, beans, peas, roots, tubers, fungi and flowers etc.
            I would love to have my garden full of them so I can just wander and
            pick whatever is in season.
            Are Bamboo shoots you get in Chinese restaurants real shoots of Bamboo?
            That grows like mad over here and it is a job to get rid of if anything.
            I can see this is going to turn into a real project.
            Thanks again
            Love, Whinnie

            stephen barstow wrote:
            > I posted the following on another forum recently. The list below covers
            > (mostly) salad plants, I use a number of other plants cooked. Hope it is of
            > some interest….
            >
            > ----------------------------
            >
            > Having been inspired some years ago by just how good perennial vegetables
            > can be through a Norwegian Society called the Useful Plants Society
            > (Nyttevekstforeningen), in particular some of the wild herbs which grow in
            > the wild and on the perimeters of my cultivated gardens - examples are
            > Ground Elder (Aegopodium podagraria) and Nettle (Urtica dioica) - I have
            > systematically collected and experimented with perennial vegetables suited
            > to my relatively cold climate here in mid-Norway (64.5N, with a minimum
            > temperature of about -23C) for the last 20-years. In fact I probably now
            > harvest more perennial green vegetables than cultivated.
            >
            > Perennial greens complement traditional greens as they are at their peak in
            > the spring time when little else is available, they are easy to grow needing
            > little maintenance (more important as one gets older ), pests aren’t a big
            > problem either in the springtime, and despite the fact that there aren’t
            > many perennial veggies that have been improved relative to their wild
            > relatives (most of them are effectively wild plants), yields from some of
            > them can be comparable to traditional veggies (my best and highest yielding
            > spinach plants are wild plants, in particular Caucasian Spinach, see below).
            > Although perennials peak in springtime, some are useful the whole summer
            > (e.g., Malva moschata, which is perennial here - needs a dry location to be
            > perennial I think) or can be cut down repeatedly to harvest the new growth.
            >
            > We regularly use plants from some 50 botanical families in springtime and
            > probably around 150-200 species, all perennials. First of all there is
            > nothing comparable to lettuce in what perennials can offer and, in my
            > opinion, perennial salads are best as mixed salads. A plain dandelion or
            > chicory (biannual, I know) salad would be too much (strong, bitter), but
            > mixed with a selection of other herbs can be very tasty (multiple taste
            > sensations).
            >
            > I’ve made a list below of some of my favourite spring perennial salad
            > vegetables:
            >
            > Aegopodium podagraria, Ground Elder (feared weed - I use this one regularly
            > in springtime, the young light green leaves are best for salads)
            >
            >
            > Agastache spp. (most are perennial and a little adds a pleasant sweet
            > licorice taste)
            >
            > Allium spp. (there are hundreds of species to choose from and many are in my
            > opinion are better than Chives; Try growing hardneck Garlic as a perennial
            > in a part of the garden and you can use the young shoots early every spring)
            >
            > Aralia spp. (I’ve only used the Japanese Aralia cordata or Udo so far –
            > excellent and very productive, it needs to be blanched before use – cover
            > with a very large bucket as the shoots can be 1m when harvested)
            >
            > Armoracia (Horseradish) – young spring shoots in moderation (can also be
            > blanched)
            >
            > Barbarea vulgaris (Common Wintercress) - early spring leaves
            >
            > Campanula latifolia, Giant Bellflower (and other Campanulas) - there’s a
            > long tradition of using this one here in Norway in spring soups
            >
            > Carum carvi, Caraway (although a biennial, when grown in the same place it
            > self-seeds and appears as a perennial); young spring shoots.
            >
            > Chrysanthemum vulgare – excellent in salads
            >
            > Diplotaxis spp. (Perennial Rockets) - although perennial they seem to be
            > short-lived although that could be my climate. Are sometimes grown and sold
            > in supermarkets as rocket (Arugula)
            >
            >
            >
            > Hablitzia tamnoides (Caucasian Spinach) - this is in my experience probably
            > the most underrated (or rather unknown) edible in the temperate world - a
            > fantastic productive spring spinach and salad plant. Read my article in
            > Permaculture Magazine here:
            > HYPERLINK
            > "http://www.hagegal.info/innlegg/media-diverse-store-filer/media-stephen-h.p
            > hp" \nhttp://www.hagegal.info/innlegg/medi...-stephen-h.php
            > (I would love to offer this one but unlike its close relatives (Chenopodium
            > spp.) it only produces a few seed).
            >
            > Humulus lupulus (Hops) - very young spring shoots before they get too
            > fibrous
            >
            > Hydrophyllum spp. (Indian Salad) - I tried this for the first time (H.
            > virginianum, I think) and was impressed.
            >
            > Malva moschata (Musk Mallow) - comes in white and pink flowered forms. This
            > is reliably perennial with me (needs a dry spot). I use this from early
            > spring to late summer (young leaves, fruits and flowers).
            >
            > Matteuccia struthiopteris (Ostrich Fern) – Excellent spring fiddleheads for
            > the woodland garden.
            >
            > Mentha, Melissa, Pycnanthemum, Osmorhiza and other aromatics
            >
            > Oxyria digyna (Mountain Sorrel)
            >
            > Rumex spp. (R. scutatus and R. acetosa) are excellent and productive
            >
            > Scorzonera (and the mostly biennial Tragopogons) - excellent spring greens,
            > flower buds and petals can all be used in salad.
            >
            > Taraxacum spp. (I have a collection of over 10 species, including
            > red-leaved, pink and white flowered, French cultivars etc.)
            >
            > Tilia cordata (Small-leaved lime)
            >
            > There are many more...can’t wait for spring...
            >
            > Sorry for the length of this but I really feel that Perennials are grossly
            > underused and probably as healthy as food comes...
            >
            >
            >
            > Stephen, Norway
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > No virus found in this outgoing message.
            > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
            > Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.21.1/1302 - Release Date: 27.02.2008
            > 16:34
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Michael Porter
            On the Daves Garden web site, --you may be able to find Baa , she is in the UK and very knowledgeable - and probly some others also, --Michael Mary Lloyd
            Message 5 of 22 , Mar 1, 2008
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              On the Daves Garden web site, --you may be able to find Baa , she is in the UK and very knowledgeable - and probly some others also, --Michael

              Mary Lloyd <mary@...> wrote: Hi and thanks Michael and Julie...
              I am in Wales UK. Lots of rain and milder winters than in the E. of
              Britain.
              I didn't realize Good King Henry was a perennial. Artichokes, great! Is
              the globe type easy to grow? I have grown the jerusalem ones: they are
              pretty and I like the taste of the tubers. However they do have that
              particular side effect, you know the one I mean......(smile)
              Love, Whinnie
              Michael Porter wrote:
              >
              > If you live far enough south I would have some sugestions for you,
              > --what Zone do you garden in? Michael Porter
              >
              > Julie Bruton-Seal <herbalist@...
              > <mailto:herbalist%40onetel.com>> wrote: How about artichokes? Both
              > globe and Jerusalem. And rhubarb, oca
              > (Oxalis tuberosa), Good King Henry, and salad burnet. Then there's
              > edible 'weeds' like dandelion and nettles, and other salad plants like
              > primrose. I'm sure there're lots more too.
              > Julie
              > On 25 Feb 2008, at 21:03, Mary Lloyd wrote:
              > >
              > > What I would like to grow in my garden is a collection of
              > > perennial vegetables. All I can think of so far are Asparagus and
              > > Seakale. If anyone has info about others, please pass it on.
              > > Love, Whinnie
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Infowolf1@aol.com
              is it big bamboo or the little skinny ones? There is more than one bamboo species, you might want to find out about edibility of all of them. In a message
              Message 6 of 22 , Mar 1, 2008
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                is it big bamboo or the little skinny ones? There is more than one
                bamboo species, you might want to find out about edibility of all
                of them.


                In a message dated 3/1/2008 7:14:09 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
                mary@... writes:

                Are Bamboo shoots you get in Chinese restaurants real shoots of Bamboo?
                That grows like mad over here and it is a job to get rid of if anything.
                I can see this is going to turn into a real project.





                **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
                (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
                2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Infowolf1@aol.com
                diarrhea or aphrodisiac? In a message dated 3/1/2008 7:14:01 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, mary@latter-rain.com writes: I have grown the jerusalem ones: they
                Message 7 of 22 , Mar 1, 2008
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                  diarrhea or aphrodisiac?


                  In a message dated 3/1/2008 7:14:01 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
                  mary@... writes:

                  I have grown the jerusalem ones: they are
                  pretty and I like the taste of the tubers. However they do have that
                  particular side effect, you know the one I mean......(smile)





                  **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
                  (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
                  2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • edibleforests
                  hello all, i m new to the group but have been a follower of pfaf for many years... just wanted to chime in... for a great resource on perennial vegetables i
                  Message 8 of 22 , Mar 1, 2008
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                    hello all,

                    i'm new to the group but have been a follower of pfaf for many
                    years... just wanted to chime in... for a great resource on perennial
                    vegetables i highly recommend reading the book Perennial Vegetables by
                    Eric Toensmeier. Check it out of your local library or order it from
                    the publisher. have fun reading... if you would like to check out a
                    Toensmeier co-created project go to www.communitysupportedforestry.com

                    be well,
                    jonathan
                  • Michael Porter
                    Gas Infowolf1@aol.com wrote: diarrhea or aphrodisiac? In a message dated 3/1/2008 7:14:01 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, mary@latter-rain.com writes: I
                    Message 9 of 22 , Mar 1, 2008
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                      Gas

                      Infowolf1@... wrote: diarrhea or aphrodisiac?


                      In a message dated 3/1/2008 7:14:01 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
                      mary@... writes:

                      I have grown the jerusalem ones: they are
                      pretty and I like the taste of the tubers. However they do have that
                      particular side effect, you know the one I mean......(smile)

                      **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
                      (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
                      2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Mary Lloyd
                      Yep, thats the one...GAS. I hadn t heard Jerusalem artichokes were aphrodisiac, could be a musical experience! hehe
                      Message 10 of 22 , Mar 2, 2008
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                        Yep, thats the one...GAS. I hadn't heard Jerusalem artichokes were
                        aphrodisiac, could be a musical experience! hehe
                        Michael Porter wrote:
                        >
                        > Gas
                        >
                        > Infowolf1@... <mailto:Infowolf1%40aol.com> wrote: diarrhea or
                        > aphrodisiac?
                        >
                        > In a message dated 3/1/2008 7:14:01 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
                        > mary@... <mailto:mary%40latter-rain.com> writes:
                        >
                        > I have grown the jerusalem ones: they are
                        > pretty and I like the taste of the tubers. However they do have that
                        > particular side effect, you know the one I mean......(smile)
                        >
                        > **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
                        > (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
                        > <http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/>
                        > 2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                      • Clinton McDowell
                        Hello, ALL bamboo shoots are edible ...tho some are far tastier than others. generally they are boiled twice(throw out the boiled water each time). that
                        Message 11 of 22 , Mar 2, 2008
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                          Hello,
                          ALL bamboo shoots are edible ...tho some are far tastier than others. generally they are boiled twice(throw out the boiled water each time). that boiling process gets rid of some of the bitter taste. None-the-less bamboo shoots ARE considered bitter in the chinese way of looking at food. Write me personally if you are more interested in specifis shoots.
                          The most common shoots from china are ¨Moso¨(Phyllostachys pubescens) also good are Ph. dulcis,Ph. aurea,Dendrocalamus asper, Bambusa oldhamii a certain cultivar w/a ¨weeping¨grass like habit as opposed to the more common very straight species.

                          Infowolf1@... escribió:
                          is it big bamboo or the little skinny ones? There is more than one
                          bamboo species, you might want to find out about edibility of all
                          of them.


                          In a message dated 3/1/2008 7:14:09 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
                          mary@... writes:

                          Are Bamboo shoots you get in Chinese restaurants real shoots of Bamboo?
                          That grows like mad over here and it is a job to get rid of if anything.
                          I can see this is going to turn into a real project.

                          **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
                          (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
                          2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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