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Re: [pfaf] Edible Hibiscus

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  • Dan Culbertson
    There is apparently a great deal of variation in the species. I ve bought the seeds before and got something sort of okra-like with small hairy leaves that
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 2, 2008
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      There is apparently a great deal of variation in the species. I've bought
      the seeds before and got something sort of okra-like with small hairy leaves
      that were, if edible, not at all tasty. The "Edible Hibiscus" with nice
      glossy leaves the size of dinner plates is supposedly the same species
      according to a biologist friend but you could have fooled me. Anyhow, I
      had some of the glossy leaf ones growing well until the recent freeze up
      here in Gainesville Florida when they froze to the ground. I'm hoping they
      will come back in the spring. I work with a group called "The Edible Plant
      Project" and we sell the plants rooted in pots at the Farmer's Market but we
      haven't got many left and none are large enough to take cuttings from.
      Whenever mine come back (or if I replace them with new clones in the spring)
      I can send you a cutting.

      If you don't want to wait until my plants recover, ECHO down in Fort Myers
      Florida has the plant at their nursery. I don't think they send plants
      through the mail so you'd have to drive down there. They are on-line at
      http://www.echonet.org/nursery.htm . The edible leaf hibiscus is listed at
      their link Index of all the species in the catalog and there are a lot of
      other plants that grow well in subtropical Florida listed there so it is
      well worth the visit.

      Dan

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "marshall_composer" <vaiaata@...>
      To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, February 01, 2008 20:05
      Subject: [pfaf] Edible Hibiscus


      > Greetings from Orlando, Florida,
      >
      > I'm a new member of this list - and a new Floridian ex-Auckland New
      > Zealand, (and a while before that, Samoa).
      >
      > I bought seeds of Abelmoschus Manihot from an online seed catalogue
      > but was disappointed to find the plants they produced bore resemblance
      > to the delicious 'laupele' plant I used to grow in Samoa. That plant's
      > leaves were about 1 foot in diameter, very tender, smooth and quite
      > 'slimy' like okra. We rarely saw them flower but the branches could be
      > broken off and stuck in the ground where they started growing
      > immediately - sometimes hardly even wilting. It was a perennial up to
      > about 8 feet tall. Does anyone on this list have this plant?
      >
      > What I received from the catalogue had hairy scrawny leaves and is
      > definitely very annual!
      >
      > Thanks for the information,
      >
      > Chris
    • Marshall and Endemann
      Thanks a lot for that Dan ... That s exactly what I ve got! Pretty extreme for a variation! And it was cold here too but those plants were clearly on the way
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 2, 2008
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        Thanks a lot for that Dan

        > sort of okra-like with small hairy leaves that were, if edible, not
        > at all tasty.

        That's exactly what I've got! Pretty extreme for a variation! And it
        was cold here too but those plants were clearly on the way out
        beforehand.

        Below I've got a photo of laupele (very well picked!) from our garden
        in Samoa.

        > Whenever mine come back (or if I replace them with new clones in the
        > spring)
        > I can send you a cutting.

        I really appreciate that. Do you have Bac Ha up there? Vietnamese aroid
        with edible stems? I was excited to find a root of that here and it's
        starting to divide. By spring maybe we could do a swap - if you haven't
        got it. And I'm hoping my casana seeds will sprout in the spring also.

        My latest search is for some pondapple trees. We have a mainly wetland
        property and I want to graft atemoyas onto them. And then chaya and
        then. . .

        Thanks for the tip on ECHO. Sounds like an excellent place to visit -
        I'll check it out on the web. Haven't been south of Bok Tower yet - or
        north of Sanford! A lot of exploring to do!

        Best wishes,

        Chris
        ________________
        Christopher Marshall
        Composer in Residence - University of Central Florida
        Address: Vaia'ata
        1819 Rouse Lake Road
        Orlando, FL 32817
        Phone: 321 274-4198
        Email: <composer@...>
        Web: <www.vaiaata.com/composer.html>


        ----------



        On Feb 2, 2008, at 9:15 AM, Dan Culbertson wrote:

        > There is apparently a great deal of variation in the species. I've
        > bought
        > the seeds before and got something sort of okra-like with small hairy
        > leaves
        > that were, if edible, not at all tasty. The "Edible Hibiscus" with
        > nice
        > glossy leaves the size of dinner plates is supposedly the same species
        > according to a biologist friend but you could have fooled me. Anyhow,
        > I
        > had some of the glossy leaf ones growing well until the recent freeze
        > up
        > here in Gainesville Florida when they froze to the ground. I'm hoping
        > they
        > will come back in the spring. I work with a group called "The Edible
        > Plant
        > Project" and we sell the plants rooted in pots at the Farmer's Market
        > but we
        > haven't got many left and none are large enough to take cuttings from.
        > Whenever mine come back (or if I replace them with new clones in the
        > spring)
        > I can send you a cutting.
        >
        > If you don't want to wait until my plants recover, ECHO down in Fort
        > Myers
        > Florida has the plant at their nursery. I don't think they send plants
        > through the mail so you'd have to drive down there. They are on-line
        > at
        > http://www.echonet.org/nursery.htm . The edible leaf hibiscus is
        > listed at
        > their link Index of all the species in the catalog and there are a
        > lot of
        > other plants that grow well in subtropical Florida listed there so it
        > is
        > well worth the visit.
        >
        > Dan
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "marshall_composer" <vaiaata@...>
        > To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Friday, February 01, 2008 20:05
        > Subject: [pfaf] Edible Hibiscus
        >
        > > Greetings from Orlando, Florida,
        > >
        > > I'm a new member of this list - and a new Floridian ex-Auckland New
        > > Zealand, (and a while before that, Samoa).
        > >
        > > I bought seeds of Abelmoschus Manihot from an online seed catalogue
        > > but was disappointed to find the plants they produced bore
        > resemblance
        > > to the delicious 'laupele' plant I used to grow in Samoa. That
        > plant's
        > > leaves were about 1 foot in diameter, very tender, smooth and quite
        > > 'slimy' like okra. We rarely saw them flower but the branches could
        > be
        > > broken off and stuck in the ground where they started growing
        > > immediately - sometimes hardly even wilting. It was a perennial up
        > to
        > > about 8 feet tall. Does anyone on this list have this plant?
        > >
        > > What I received from the catalogue had hairy scrawny leaves and is
        > > definitely very annual!
        > >
        > > Thanks for the information,
        > >
        > > Chris
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dan Culbertson
        I would love to get a tuber of Bac Ha. I ve been looking for it for a while. So a srping trade looks like a winner! I also have some dead Chaya (which I
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 2, 2008
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          I would love to get a tuber of Bac Ha. I've been looking for it for a
          while. So a srping trade looks like a winner! I also have some dead Chaya
          (which I also *hope* will come back by spring). I have the one with
          stinging hairs in the yeard but I have a couple of starts of the one without
          the sting in my greenhouse which I got from Michael P. Might take a while
          to get those big enough to share - but they grow fast once they get in the
          ground so maybe I'll have some cuttings of that by spring too.

          I don't know where to get pondapple. Not sure what the species is on that
          since there appear to be a couple plants with that common name. Maybe it is
          Annona glabra (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pond-apple)? Says it is native
          to Florida. If that is the species the seeds are available from
          Tradeswinds Fruit http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/pond_apple.htm . I think
          there is another one called by that name which is native throughout the U.S.
          southeast but I don't remember the species name for it.

          Dan

          > I really appreciate that. Do you have Bac Ha up there? Vietnamese aroid
          > with edible stems? I was excited to find a root of that here and it's
          > starting to divide. By spring maybe we could do a swap - if you haven't
          > got it. And I'm hoping my casana seeds will sprout in the spring also.
          >
          > My latest search is for some pondapple trees. We have a mainly wetland
          > property and I want to graft atemoyas onto them. And then chaya and
          > then. . .
          >
          > Thanks for the tip on ECHO. Sounds like an excellent place to visit -
          > I'll check it out on the web. Haven't been south of Bok Tower yet - or
          > north of Sanford! A lot of exploring to do!
          >
          > Best wishes,
          >
          > Chris
        • Marshall and Endemann
          Thanks for the pond apple links. Yes, that s definitely the fruit I m after - strictly as a root-stock - I had no idea that it was narcotic! Great that you
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 2, 2008
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            Thanks for the pond apple links. Yes, that's definitely the fruit I'm
            after - strictly as a root-stock - I had no idea that it was narcotic!

            Great that you have - or may have later some chaya plants. I' think
            I'll pass on the ones with stinging hairs for now!

            Chris

            On Feb 2, 2008, at 1:46 PM, Dan Culbertson wrote:

            > I would love to get a tuber of Bac Ha. I've been looking for it for a
            > while. So a srping trade looks like a winner! I also have some dead
            > Chaya
            > (which I also *hope* will come back by spring). I have the one with
            > stinging hairs in the yeard but I have a couple of starts of the one
            > without
            > the sting in my greenhouse which I got from Michael P. Might take a
            > while
            > to get those big enough to share - but they grow fast once they get
            > in the
            > ground so maybe I'll have some cuttings of that by spring too.
            >
            > I don't know where to get pondapple. Not sure what the species is on
            > that
            > since there appear to be a couple plants with that common name. Maybe
            > it is
            > Annona glabra (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pond-apple)? Says it is
            > native
            > to Florida. If that is the species the seeds are available from
            > Tradeswinds Fruit http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/pond_apple.htm . I
            > think
            > there is another one called by that name which is native throughout
            > the U.S.
            > southeast but I don't remember the species name for it.
            >
            > Dan
            >
            > > I really appreciate that. Do you have Bac Ha up there? Vietnamese
            > aroid
            > > with edible stems? I was excited to find a root of that here and
            > it's
            > > starting to divide. By spring maybe we could do a swap - if you
            > haven't
            > > got it. And I'm hoping my casana seeds will sprout in the spring
            > also.
            > >
            > > My latest search is for some pondapple trees. We have a mainly
            > wetland
            > > property and I want to graft atemoyas onto them. And then chaya and
            > > then. . .
            > >
            > > Thanks for the tip on ECHO. Sounds like an excellent place to visit
            > -
            > > I'll check it out on the web. Haven't been south of Bok Tower yet -
            > or
            > > north of Sanford! A lot of exploring to do!
            > >
            > > Best wishes,
            > >
            > > Chris
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Traveler in Thyme
            I don t know if the seed pods are tasty, but hibiscus flowers are sweet and make lovely, edible decorations for cakes and buffets, and brew a great cup of tea.
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 3, 2008
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              I don't know if the seed pods are tasty, but hibiscus flowers are sweet and
              make lovely, edible decorations for cakes and buffets, and brew a great cup
              of tea. We eat our Althea (Rose of Sharon) flowers, also, as they are in
              the hibiscus family, not so strong flavored but like a hibiscus, they will
              stay open for a whole day, without being in a vase of water. This is why
              hibiscus flowers are used in Hawaiian leis, and they look beautiful as
              corsages and hair ornaments.

              I had a pet rat who LOVED althea blossoms and would eat a whole bouquet in a
              few minutes........


              ---Marcia Cash
              Traveler in Thyme
              http://www.travelerinthyme.com


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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