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R: [pfaf] TAGUA NUT ! Vegetal Ivory

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  • Angelo
    I met the tagua ,well I met Miguel Andrade of Ecuanatura. He has tagua seeds and sell seeds and handycraft artesania objects. He is from Ecuador you may
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 18, 2002
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      I met the tagua ,well I met Miguel Andrade of Ecuanatura.
      He has tagua seeds and sell seeds and handycraft 'artesania' objects.
       
      He is from Ecuador you may contact him :
       
       
      Guadalupe Cadena 593-9-9072789
      Roca 538 y J.L.Mera.Ed.Casal Guarderas
      Telefax 0059322-230845
      Quito Ecuador
       
      Milano Italia
      Miguel Andrade 333.3237579/339.4409222
      Bastione di Porta Volta Milano  Mi
      Italia
       
       
      Angelo Barbetti
      Buonconvento Siena
      Italia
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 6:57 PM
      Subject: [pfaf] Some questions from our discussion groups

      As well as this mailing list PFAF also has a set of discussion
      groups linked to each page in the site and the plants in the database.
            http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/cgi-bin/pfaf/allcom
      We get quite a few people posting questions to these groups
      which might spark a bit of discussion. I'm posting some
      of these queries below. If you do reply it would be great
      if you also reply to the email address of the sender.

            Rich


      Richard Fiorino rich@... wrote:
            Where can I find bleached line flax for spinning?

      Barry A.Clark jasminkay39@...
            Caravan site with a shady wood with Oak trees & Mountain Ash.
            Ground is Grey Clay so its slim on the top in Winter & like
            concrete in Summer.Loads of Fiberous Tree roots. Need lists
            of Plants & Shrubs.Its also on a Slop facing due South in
            Shropshire UK.

      A.Wigmore amjwigmore@...

      I grow various unusual tubers in my raised vegetable beds:
      oxalis tuberosa, tropaeolum tuberosum , apios americana,
      dioscorea batatas (that one does not do well, probably too
      cold without protection), yacon. I wonder if any or all of
      them will benefit from a load of compost, and whether it is
      good to grow them in the same place year after year?

      Myrtus Ugni: I have had two plants for some three years, one in a
      vegetable
      bed, one in poorish soil in the front garden. One was fruiting
      when I bought it, never has done since. The other was rather
      bigger when I bought it and has never fruited. The fruit were
      delicious, but how to get them to give me some more?

      Tom Hennen thennen@...

      I need a recommendation for a good ground cover plant for a home
      located on Galveston Bay south of Houston, Texas.  It has been
      suggested that I use "Asian Jasmine".  I have very little knowledge
      of gardening, let alone this specific plant.  Please help!  Thanks!

      Unknown wrote

      I have a large area planted with junipers for erosion control. My
      problem is controlling the grass that grows within the plants.
      Is there a way to stop the growth of grass and not damage the plants?

      Ute Beling diesiebdruckerei@...

      I'm looking for seed or help fur cultivation .
      Also I'm looking for a whole Tagua nut ( natural ivory )
      If there is someone who likes to contact me .
      I am from Hamburg Germany.
      Thanks a lot.


      --
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    • fairly obvious, I suspect
      Lots of things are called jasmine based on fragrance--most are *extremely toxic* (only make jasmine tea with jasminum flowers if at all!!!), and are
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 28, 2002
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        Lots of things are called "jasmine" based on fragrance--most are
        *extremely toxic* (only make "jasmine" tea with jasminum flowers if at
        all!!!), and are members of the dogbane, milkweed, strychnine, and
        nightshade families. As a ground cover, "asian jasmine" probably
        refers to Trachelstemon (sp?) jasminoides or T. asiatica (or related),
        which are better known as Confederate jasmines (at least in FL). They
        are (dark) evergreen, tolerate sun or some shade, a few variegated
        forms exist, and have pinwheel-shape white or cream ~1 inch fragrant
        flowers (white-flowered T. jasminoides has what I'm guessing is
        "jasmine" fragrance; T. asiatica has broader, creamy petals with
        orangeish eyes and smells somewhat like cinnamon). They are dogbanes
        and highly toxic, but look handsome, smell wonderful, and are fairly
        tough (in the Deep South). Other "jasmines' (Jasminum, Cestrum,
        Mandevilla sauvis, Gelsimium sempervirens) really need to climb
        something. Confederate jasmine will twine if it can, but is happy as
        a groundcover also. The primary sunny groundcover in northern FL is
        that evil "two-finger" turfgrass (basically crabgrass w/ runners) that
        simply refuses to be killed and encourages nematode burdens lethal to
        everything I want to grow (figs, strawberries, gardenia, okra,
        tomatoes...). As a result, I can't make recommendations for sunny
        areas (except for "arid" sandhills--use the perfumy-fruited "gopher
        apple," Licania michauxii, or other native vegetation because you have
        little choice; maybe exotic succulents would succeed except that
        sandhills have acid soils). Dutch clover? Corsican Mint? Since FL is
        flat, I don't worry much about erosion, so I don't mind empty patches
        under trees, pending finding something useful to fill them with. (The
        feds went around in the 1930s and "solved" an erosion problem that
        didn't exist locally; the result: our forests and homes have been
        buried and killed by kudzu. Thanks, FDR.) If you don't mind tall
        "groundcovers," I'd recommend gingers for the live-oak-level
        (translation for y'all Yanks and Limeys: very dark, year-round) shady
        areas. Globba sp. and Zingiber miogi supposedly spread quickly. The
        Japanese eat Z. miogi flowers and new shoots (probably as a spice) and
        at least one ornamental,variagated form exists. Shade is also a good
        place for Cammelias (incl. tea, C. sinsensis).

        --Erik

        > Tom Hennen thennen@h...
        >
        > I need a recommendation for a good ground cover plant for a home
        > located on Galveston Bay south of Houston, Texas. It has been
        > suggested that I use "Asian Jasmine". I have very little
        knowledge
        > of gardening, let alone this specific plant. Please help!
        Thanks!
        >
        > Unknown wrote
        >
        > I have a large area planted with junipers for erosion control. My
        > problem is controlling the grass that grows within the plants.
        > Is there a way to stop the growth of grass and not damage the
        plants?

        Well, if all you wanted was erosion control, what's wrong with extra
        grass?
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