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Forever autumn?

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  • vic_doyle
    Late late flowering and dropping of leaves. I live in the Rhondda South Wales UK and approx 900 above sea level, our growing season is usually about a month
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 15, 2008
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      Late late flowering and dropping of leaves.
      I live in the Rhondda South Wales UK and approx 900' above sea level,
      our growing season is usually about a month behind neighbouring areas
      which are more like 500' above sea levels. I've noticed this year that
      the leaves at the tops on my willow trees have still not yet dropped
      off, and as I was taught 10 years ago when learning about taking willow
      cuttings, that you can usually transplant after the second week of
      November as the leaves will have all dropped off by then, this 2 month
      extension of autumn is significant. Also I have still got chamomile
      flowering, a little tatty maybe, but again this is significant,
      especially as we are at altitude. No question really, I'm just happier
      sharing this with the group!
    • siderea
      I have noticed the same thing here in coastal Northern California. Our usual over lap of fall and spring for a mild winter is shortening. Some of the sweetgums
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 15, 2008
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        I have noticed the same thing here in coastal Northern California. Our
        usual over lap of fall and spring for a mild winter is shortening. Some
        of the sweetgums still held onto their fall dress till a storm came
        through last week. but the tulip magnolias, and some early plums and
        apples are blooming several weeks early. We just had the first thunder
        storm I can ever remember in January, having lived here all my life.
        Strange doings on the weather front....
        Clear skies and apple pies!
        lc Carol

        vic_doyle wrote:
        > Late late flowering and dropping of leaves.
        > I live in the Rhondda South Wales UK and approx 900' above sea level,
        > our growing season is usually about a month behind neighbouring areas
        > which are more like 500' above sea levels. I've noticed this year that
        > the leaves at the tops on my willow trees have still not yet dropped
        > off, and as I was taught 10 years ago when learning about taking willow
        > cuttings, that you can usually transplant after the second week of
        > November as the leaves will have all dropped off by then, this 2 month
        > extension of autumn is significant. Also I have still got chamomile
        > flowering, a little tatty maybe, but again this is significant,
        > especially as we are at altitude. No question really, I'm just happier
        > sharing this with the group!
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Vanessa King
        Hi I think this is a global phenomenon - Im in Norfolk, East of England (Anglia) and last month a week before Christmas I had a Himalayan Poppy in full bloom!
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 18, 2008
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          Hi I think this is a global phenomenon - Im in Norfolk, East of England (Anglia) and last
          month a week before Christmas I had a Himalayan Poppy in full bloom! It normally only
          blooms in June. Now, mid-January we have not seen one Snowdrop yet - they are about
          three weeks overdue - same with crocus and all the spring flowers!

          Nessie x

          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, siderea <siderea@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have noticed the same thing here in coastal Northern California. Our
          > usual over lap of fall and spring for a mild winter is shortening. Some
          > of the sweetgums still held onto their fall dress till a storm came
          > through last week. but the tulip magnolias, and some early plums and
          > apples are blooming several weeks early. We just had the first thunder
          > storm I can ever remember in January, having lived here all my life.
          > Strange doings on the weather front....
          > Clear skies and apple pies!
          > lc Carol
          >
          > vic_doyle wrote:
          > > Late late flowering and dropping of leaves.
          > > I live in the Rhondda South Wales UK and approx 900' above sea level,
          > > our growing season is usually about a month behind neighbouring areas
          > > which are more like 500' above sea levels. I've noticed this year that
          > > the leaves at the tops on my willow trees have still not yet dropped
          > > off, and as I was taught 10 years ago when learning about taking willow
          > > cuttings, that you can usually transplant after the second week of
          > > November as the leaves will have all dropped off by then, this 2 month
          > > extension of autumn is significant. Also I have still got chamomile
          > > flowering, a little tatty maybe, but again this is significant,
          > > especially as we are at altitude. No question really, I'm just happier
          > > sharing this with the group!
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Travis Philp
          Last year here in southern ontario canada we had a very extended fall. A friend of mine went canoing on her Christmas break which is unheard of around these
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 18, 2008
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            Last year here in southern ontario canada we had a very extended fall. A friend of mine went canoing on her Christmas break which is unheard of around these parts. Except for a few flurries in November I don't think we got snow until after Christmas.

            This year was a little more normalized in the fall but about two weeks ago we were getting temperatures well above freezing for a number of days, which is definetly not normal for this area. Whether or not humans are the cause, things are definetly warming up lately...

            -----Original Message-----
            From: "Vanessa King" <merton.moonsilver@...>
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 10:50:25 -0000
            Subject: [pfaf] Re: Forever autumn?

            Hi I think this is a global phenomenon - Im in Norfolk, East of England (Anglia) and last
            month a week before Christmas I had a Himalayan Poppy in full bloom! It normally only
            blooms in June. Now, mid-January we have not seen one Snowdrop yet - they are about
            three weeks overdue - same with crocus and all the spring flowers!

            Nessie x

            --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, siderea <siderea@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have noticed the same thing here in coastal Northern California. Our
            > usual over lap of fall and spring for a mild winter is shortening. Some
            > of the sweetgums still held onto their fall dress till a storm came
            > through last week. but the tulip magnolias, and some early plums and
            > apples are blooming several weeks early. We just had the first thunder
            > storm I can ever remember in January, having lived here all my life.
            > Strange doings on the weather front....
            > Clear skies and apple pies!
            > lc Carol
            >
            > vic_doyle wrote:
            > > Late late flowering and dropping of leaves.
            > > I live in the Rhondda South Wales UK and approx 900' above sea level,
            > > our growing season is usually about a month behind neighbouring areas
            > > which are more like 500' above sea levels. I've noticed this year that
            > > the leaves at the tops on my willow trees have still not yet dropped
            > > off, and as I was taught 10 years ago when learning about taking willow
            > > cuttings, that you can usually transplant after the second week of
            > > November as the leaves will have all dropped off by then, this 2 month
            > > extension of autumn is significant. Also I have still got chamomile
            > > flowering, a little tatty maybe, but again this is significant,
            > > especially as we are at altitude. No question really, I'm just happier
            > > sharing this with the group!
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Vic Doyle
            The snowdrops are out in London, another thing is that my honeysuckle is still flowering now in the last weeks of January! Travis Philp
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 21, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              The snowdrops are out in London, another thing is that my honeysuckle is still flowering now in the last weeks of January!

              Travis Philp <trphilp@...> wrote: Last year here in southern ontario canada we had a very extended fall. A friend of mine went canoing on her Christmas break which is unheard of around these parts. Except for a few flurries in November I don't think we got snow until after Christmas.

              This year was a little more normalized in the fall but about two weeks ago we were getting temperatures well above freezing for a number of days, which is definetly not normal for this area. Whether or not humans are the cause, things are definetly warming up lately...

              -----Original Message-----
              From: "Vanessa King" <merton.moonsilver@...>
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 10:50:25 -0000
              Subject: [pfaf] Re: Forever autumn?

              Hi I think this is a global phenomenon - Im in Norfolk, East of England (Anglia) and last
              month a week before Christmas I had a Himalayan Poppy in full bloom! It normally only
              blooms in June. Now, mid-January we have not seen one Snowdrop yet - they are about
              three weeks overdue - same with crocus and all the spring flowers!

              Nessie x

              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, siderea <siderea@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have noticed the same thing here in coastal Northern California. Our
              > usual over lap of fall and spring for a mild winter is shortening. Some
              > of the sweetgums still held onto their fall dress till a storm came
              > through last week. but the tulip magnolias, and some early plums and
              > apples are blooming several weeks early. We just had the first thunder
              > storm I can ever remember in January, having lived here all my life.
              > Strange doings on the weather front....
              > Clear skies and apple pies!
              > lc Carol
              >
              > vic_doyle wrote:
              > > Late late flowering and dropping of leaves.
              > > I live in the Rhondda South Wales UK and approx 900' above sea level,
              > > our growing season is usually about a month behind neighbouring areas
              > > which are more like 500' above sea levels. I've noticed this year that
              > > the leaves at the tops on my willow trees have still not yet dropped
              > > off, and as I was taught 10 years ago when learning about taking willow
              > > cuttings, that you can usually transplant after the second week of
              > > November as the leaves will have all dropped off by then, this 2 month
              > > extension of autumn is significant. Also I have still got chamomile
              > > flowering, a little tatty maybe, but again this is significant,
              > > especially as we are at altitude. No question really, I'm just happier
              > > sharing this with the group!
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >






              Vic Doyle
              Arts Development Officer
              Creative Communities
              Cwmaman Communities First

              The Library
              Cwmaman Hall & Institute
              Fforchaman Rd
              Cwmaman
              Aberdare
              Rhondda Cynon Taff

              Telephone 01685 887120
              Mobile 07752475556



              vic_doyle@...

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