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Re: [pfaf] Newbie intro and a question

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  • Gail Lloyd
    Darren, A list of plants should include the ones that you like to eat. Almost every herb & spice have medicinal properties - so choose the ones that you like.
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 11, 2008
      Darren,
      A list of plants should include the ones that you like to eat. Almost every herb & spice have medicinal properties - so choose the ones that you like. Here is a list to start, as well as some good websites that will help you grow in Alaska.
      Google: Alaska growing plants
      http://www.uaf.edu/ces/publications/freepubs/ABM-00642.pdf
      http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF8/874.html
      http://www.organicanews.com/news/article.cfm?story_id=94
      Greenhouse, hothouses, row covers
      HERBS:
      Gingerroot
      Sage
      Basil
      Oregano
      turmeric http://www.greenharvest.com.au/Plants/turmeric_info.html
      VEGGIES:
      Tomatoes
      Lettuce
      Cucumbers
      Peas
      Green onions
      Garlic
      GRAINS: http://www.uaf.edu/ces/publications/freepubs/FGV-00041.pdf
      Barley
      Oats
      Wheat
      BEANS:
      Pinto
      Black
      Hope this helps,
      Judy

      Darren <storm_child_277@...> wrote:
      Hi All,
      just joined and I have what maybe a basic question (bordering on quite
      complex)

      I'm interested in developing a self sustaining farm and am looking for
      a comprehensive list of plants to include in a year round garden/green
      house situation. Currently I am in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon) but
      have plans to move to Alaska in an escape move. With the sunlight being
      as it is further north, I'm expecting that I will also need to use
      additional lighting during the winter months. If possible I would like
      tto obtain my own seeds/cuttings/starts for the next season from this
      gagarden as well

      To boil it down, What would be a good list of plants to include for
      food, herbal and medicinal use with the whys. This is probably Very
      subjective but I do appreciate trying new things and this can be one
      way of including new along with the staples.

      Thanks and I look forward to further discussions.

      Darren

      email: storm_child_277@...






      ---------------------------------
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    • Travis Philp
      Hey hey, That is a loaded question but I ll stab at it. Such a northern climate as Alaska obviously will limit what you can grow. I d suggest going with as
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 18, 2008
        Hey hey,

        That is a loaded question but I'll stab at it. Such a northern climate as Alaska obviously will limit what you can grow. I'd suggest going with as many native species as possible as they are better adapted to the cold.

        Below is a link to a great database focusing on native plants both woody and herbaceous. I'd suggest planting yourself a forest garden. The database only lists canadian plants but if you search for Yukon natives that should suffice I would think. I find the advanced search is better because it gives you a lot of customization options to help you find exactly the type of plant you need. Here you go:

        http://www.evergreen.ca/nativeplants/search/

        As for greenhousing, I'm not sure if you're aware but at least here in Ontario one is able to start things like tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants in late october/early november, and get fruit by the end of march/early april. I used containers so I don't know if this woudl work if they were planted in the ground. It may be too cold for the roots. I have also been able to grow container cucumbers started in January with a harvest by the end of april.

        Year round lettuce is also possible here without even needing to heat your greenhouse. The only issue is keeping the ground warm which theoretically could be done in your climate using sheet mulched beds inside the greenhouse making sure to use organic matter with plenty of nitrogen to keep it heated.

        Other than that...grow things in season that are storable over winter. squash, beans & peas, potatoes & yams, herbs. And if you build an ice house you won't need to power a freezer so you would have a lot more storing options. Look up ice houses on google. Its a basic shed, with water filled walls. The walls freeze and keep your goods at the proper temperature, and safe from scavengers.

        Good luck and I hope this helps,

        Travis
        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Darren" <storm_child_277@...>
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2008 17:20:22 -0000
        Subject: [pfaf] Newbie intro and a question

        Hi All,
        just joined and I have what maybe a basic question (bordering on quite
        complex)

        I'm interested in developing a self sustaining farm and am looking for
        a comprehensive list of plants to include in a year round garden/green
        house situation. Currently I am in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon) but
        have plans to move to Alaska in an escape move. With the sunlight being
        as it is further north, I'm expecting that I will also need to use
        additional lighting during the winter months. If possible I would like
        tto obtain my own seeds/cuttings/starts for the next season from this
        gagarden as well

        To boil it down, What would be a good list of plants to include for
        food, herbal and medicinal use with the whys. This is probably Very
        subjective but I do appreciate trying new things and this can be one
        way of including new along with the staples.

        Thanks and I look forward to further discussions.

        Darren

        email: storm_child_277@...
      • Gloria Alexander
        Hi Darren, Understand the desire to escape and be self-supporting from the soil- Have same interest, though not for going to Alaska. You may be interested in a
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 19, 2008
          Hi Darren,
          Understand the desire to escape and be self-supporting from the soil-
          Have same interest, though not for going to Alaska. You may be interested in a wonderful book, dvd about a man who went to Alaska and built solely from what was around him there, from a log home to a stand to store his meat etc from the bears. Gave set to my son-in-law, so will need to check with him on name of it if you are interested. Just let me know.

          As for herbs great for healing,
          Goldenseal Root is a must for your medicinal cabinet, a natural antibiotic.Native Indian remedy, really works, but should not take more than 2 weeks at a time-
          Burdock root or leaves for blood purifying, old timers used it and I have used it with great results.liver rejuvenation, blood cleansing- I just chew the leaves for a while and swallow or make a tea of say 5 or so nice size leaves in 2 qts water, bring to boil and simmer good for 10 minutes or more. longer the better.
          Garlic, though seems like a wives tale for me for a long time, now understand that it is the sulphur in it that causes it to be effective. Make a garlic oil, by crushing cloves and covering with olive oil allowing to cure for 3 days by heat source,near fireplace or in hot sun.
          This is a start, if more interest, let me know. Gloria



          Travis Philp <trphilp@...> wrote: Hey hey,

          That is a loaded question but I'll stab at it. Such a northern climate as Alaska obviously will limit what you can grow. I'd suggest going with as many native species as possible as they are better adapted to the cold.

          Below is a link to a great database focusing on native plants both woody and herbaceous. I'd suggest planting yourself a forest garden. The database only lists canadian plants but if you search for Yukon natives that should suffice I would think. I find the advanced search is better because it gives you a lot of customization options to help you find exactly the type of plant you need. Here you go:

          http://www.evergreen.ca/nativeplants/search/

          As for greenhousing, I'm not sure if you're aware but at least here in Ontario one is able to start things like tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants in late october/early november, and get fruit by the end of march/early april. I used containers so I don't know if this woudl work if they were planted in the ground. It may be too cold for the roots. I have also been able to grow container cucumbers started in January with a harvest by the end of april.

          Year round lettuce is also possible here without even needing to heat your greenhouse. The only issue is keeping the ground warm which theoretically could be done in your climate using sheet mulched beds inside the greenhouse making sure to use organic matter with plenty of nitrogen to keep it heated.

          Other than that...grow things in season that are storable over winter. squash, beans & peas, potatoes & yams, herbs. And if you build an ice house you won't need to power a freezer so you would have a lot more storing options. Look up ice houses on google. Its a basic shed, with water filled walls. The walls freeze and keep your goods at the proper temperature, and safe from scavengers.

          Good luck and I hope this helps,

          Travis
          -----Original Message-----
          From: "Darren" <storm_child_277@...>
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2008 17:20:22 -0000
          Subject: [pfaf] Newbie intro and a question

          Hi All,
          just joined and I have what maybe a basic question (bordering on quite
          complex)

          I'm interested in developing a self sustaining farm and am looking for
          a comprehensive list of plants to include in a year round garden/green
          house situation. Currently I am in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon) but
          have plans to move to Alaska in an escape move. With the sunlight being
          as it is further north, I'm expecting that I will also need to use
          additional lighting during the winter months. If possible I would like
          tto obtain my own seeds/cuttings/starts for the next season from this
          gagarden as well

          To boil it down, What would be a good list of plants to include for
          food, herbal and medicinal use with the whys. This is probably Very
          subjective but I do appreciate trying new things and this can be one
          way of including new along with the staples.

          Thanks and I look forward to further discussions.

          Darren

          email: storm_child_277@...






          Gloria Hartis-Alexander
          Believing God
          www.marykay.com/truthgha
          MaryKay Shopping24/7




































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