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Re: edible plants

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  • Mat Coward
    Hello - can anyone tell me how to tell when the fruits of Chaenomeles japonica are ready for harvest? Thanks, Mat (in Somerset, UK) [Non-text portions of this
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 16, 2007
      Hello - can anyone tell me how to tell when the fruits of Chaenomeles japonica are ready for harvest?
      Thanks,
      Mat (in Somerset, UK)

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dan Culbertson
      If you *know* a leaf type is not toxic (check the PFAF database) but it is too tough or bitter to eat raw try this: Collect a bunch of leaves from a bunch of
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 16, 2007
        If you *know* a leaf type is not toxic (check the PFAF database) but it is
        too tough or bitter to eat raw try this:
        Collect a bunch of leaves from a bunch of plants, chop them up a bit, and
        boil them slowly for about a half hour in a crock pot or rice cooker. If you
        have any vegetable parings around from making salads (onion skins, celery
        tops, carrot peels, etc.) add them too. Strain off the boiling water and
        use it as a soup base. Can be frozen in an ice cube tray for latter use or,
        possibly, boiled down into a thick base or powder to save for winter (I
        haven't tried that). If you taste the leaves in the field and they are
        really bitter you might want to boil them separately and see how they taste
        boiled before dumping them in the mix. Make sure they are edible first (the
        PFAF database or any good field guide for edible plants).

        Yesterday I made a nice soup base out of the following leaves and stems and
        such: wild Florida Betony leaves, wild celery stems and leaves (going to
        seed), garden strawberry leaves, wild blackberry leaves, papaya tree leaves,
        avocado tree leaves, squash vine leaves, bean vine leaves, wild grape vine
        leaves, canna plant leaves, wild Bidens alba (Spanish Needle) leaves,
        cockscomb flower (for color), pine needles (green), lemon grass leaves,
        kaffir lime tree leaves, sweet potato leaves, and a handful of lawn grass
        (and probably a few more things I can't remember). Only used a little of
        each one and the overall flavor was generic green and slightly lemony (from
        the lemon grass and lime leaves). With a bit of vegan "no-beef" base and
        garlic along with barley and dried veggies added it was a good soup today.
        Made the dried veggie soup taste much fresher than normal and I suspect it
        had more vitamins and other good stuff. Hopefully none of those things are
        going to kill me - but they are listed as "edible" one place or another.

        Of course that all isn't "without cooking" but some of those things would
        take a goat's gut to digest raw. Or a shredder/grinder and a compost heap.
        Might have been able to dry them and powder them and turn them into munchie
        kibbles - but cooking them is probably much more tasty. Anyhow, I agree
        with the person who said we don't eat enough leaves. Eat more greens! They
        won't kill you (usually).

        Dan

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "josephkuno" <josephkuno@...>
        To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 12:37 PM
        Subject: [pfaf] edible plants


        > Hi everybody!
        > I want to post questions but I don't know where, so I tried it on this
        > space.
        > Here are my questions:
        > Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
        > cooking?
        > Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
        > say, during winter?
        > Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?
        >
        > Thank you very much.
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