Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

amaranthus seeds

Expand Messages
  • Klemen
    Hi, all! I have a few questions about amarnthus. I bought seeds of amaranthus plant and (almost) none started for a whole week. I have heard that the seeds are
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 7, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi, all!

      I have a few questions about amarnthus.

      I bought seeds of amaranthus plant and (almost) none started for a whole
      week. I have heard that the seeds are tought and it may be half of a century
      to sprout them. They do sprout when they are altered (buldozers, etc) so i
      was thinking would it be a good idea just to throw the seeds on the ground
      and then beat the earth with a showel just to wound some seeds?! or is there
      a better way to do it, such as freezing the seeds or something simmilar?

      Since my amaranthus didn't grow much, i collected wild amaranthus seeds. But
      it seems to me that they aren't palatable raw - to tough shell. So what is
      the best way to prepare them? Cooking, baking, steaming, can i put them in
      bread? Grinding? I have heard that maiyas used amaranthus - how did they
      prepare them?

      Anyone knows some good inet resources about amaranthus?

      Anyone heard about "extruding" amaranthus? I hope it is the right word - let
      me explain it. I am sure the majority of you knows about mikado chocolate.
      There is rice in it and it is extruded. So, anyone knows anything of
      extruding amaranthus?


      I very look forward to your answers/hints.

      Best Regards,
      Klemen


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • michael lasky
      kleman, in bolivia there are several grains which are similar to amaranth in appearance, including quinoa and canllahua(sp?). the later one is usually toasted
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 7, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        kleman,

        in bolivia there are several grains which are similar to amaranth in appearance, including quinoa and canllahua(sp?). the later one is usually toasted lightly and ground and mixed with warm water or milk and if desired, sugar. it is highly nutritious and delicious with a chocolate like flavor. the leaves are often eaten in salads or cooked and added to soups. i think toasting and grinding is the way to go.

        maikito


        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.comFrom: dva_wolk@...: Sun, 7 Oct 2007 23:30:56 +0200Subject: [pfaf] amaranthus seeds




        Hi, all!I have a few questions about amarnthus.I bought seeds of amaranthus plant and (almost) none started for a wholeweek. I have heard that the seeds are tought and it may be half of a centuryto sprout them. They do sprout when they are altered (buldozers, etc) so iwas thinking would it be a good idea just to throw the seeds on the groundand then beat the earth with a showel just to wound some seeds?! or is therea better way to do it, such as freezing the seeds or something simmilar?Since my amaranthus didn't grow much, i collected wild amaranthus seeds. Butit seems to me that they aren't palatable raw - to tough shell. So what isthe best way to prepare them? Cooking, baking, steaming, can i put them inbread? Grinding? I have heard that maiyas used amaranthus - how did theyprepare them?Anyone knows some good inet resources about amaranthus?Anyone heard about "extruding" amaranthus? I hope it is the right word - letme explain it. I am sure the majority of you knows about mikado chocolate.There is rice in it and it is extruded. So, anyone knows anything ofextruding amaranthus?I very look forward to your answers/hints.Best Regards,Klemen[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        _________________________________________________________________
        Boo! Scare away worms, viruses and so much more! Try Windows Live OneCare!
        http://onecare.live.com/standard/en-us/purchase/trial.aspx?s_cid=wl_hotmailnews

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • greenman3220
        Greetings Klemen, I got a bag of amaranth from some health food store last Spring - it germinated quite easily in moist paper towels in a covered container (on
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 8, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Greetings Klemen,

          I got a bag of amaranth from some health food store last Spring - it
          germinated quite easily in moist paper towels in a covered container (on
          top of the fridge to catch 'waste heat' - then it did fine out in the
          field (USDA Zone 7a, alkaline cherty clay soil) until the groundhogs or
          rabbits found my test patch, dammit [/:)]

          Extrusion sounds like a great idea to expand potential market - go for
          it. Maybe grind up some seed, make a 'fluffy' dough/paste and run it
          thru and old meat grinder sort of thing -- maybe better yet a pastry bag
          - should be good enough for trials anyway.

          good luck,
          Granger





          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Klemen <dva_wolk@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi, all!
          >
          > I have a few questions about amarnthus.
          >
          > I bought seeds of amaranthus plant and (almost) none started for a
          whole
          > week. I have heard that the seeds are tought and it may be half of a
          century
          > to sprout them. They do sprout when they are altered (buldozers, etc)
          so i
          > was thinking would it be a good idea just to throw the seeds on the
          ground
          > and then beat the earth with a showel just to wound some seeds?! or is
          there
          > a better way to do it, such as freezing the seeds or something
          simmilar?
          >
          > Since my amaranthus didn't grow much, i collected wild amaranthus
          seeds. But
          > it seems to me that they aren't palatable raw - to tough shell. So
          what is
          > the best way to prepare them? Cooking, baking, steaming, can i put
          them in
          > bread? Grinding? I have heard that maiyas used amaranthus - how did
          they
          > prepare them?
          >
          > Anyone knows some good inet resources about amaranthus?
          >
          > Anyone heard about "extruding" amaranthus? I hope it is the right word
          - let
          > me explain it. I am sure the majority of you knows about mikado
          chocolate.
          > There is rice in it and it is extruded. So, anyone knows anything of
          > extruding amaranthus?
          >
          >
          > I very look forward to your answers/hints.
          >
          > Best Regards,
          > Klemen
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Clinton McDowell
          Toast the seeds ...they ¨pop¨ open turning white(er,off white) here in Mexico it becomes a weed ..there is NO problem for them sprouting `round here they
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 8, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Toast the seeds ...they ¨pop¨ open turning white(er,off white) here in Mexico it becomes a weed ..there is NO problem for them sprouting

            `round here they make something called ¨alegria¨...HAPPINESS... using honey to make it stick toigether...I´ve seen it done with chocolate too ..w/ vanilla seasoning uuuuummmmmm!!!!
            mix the two, or try nuts too, ingredients put in a mold into oven (low heat) & voila ...H A P P I N E S S....raisins work pumpkin seeds...etc

            Klemen <dva_wolk@...> escribió:
            Hi, all!

            I have a few questions about amarnthus.

            I bought seeds of amaranthus plant and (almost) none started for a whole
            week. I have heard that the seeds are tought and it may be half of a century
            to sprout them. They do sprout when they are altered (buldozers, etc) so i
            was thinking would it be a good idea just to throw the seeds on the ground
            and then beat the earth with a showel just to wound some seeds?! or is there
            a better way to do it, such as freezing the seeds or something simmilar?

            Since my amaranthus didn't grow much, i collected wild amaranthus seeds. But
            it seems to me that they aren't palatable raw - to tough shell. So what is
            the best way to prepare them? Cooking, baking, steaming, can i put them in
            bread? Grinding? I have heard that maiyas used amaranthus - how did they
            prepare them?

            Anyone knows some good inet resources about amaranthus?

            Anyone heard about "extruding" amaranthus? I hope it is the right word - let
            me explain it. I am sure the majority of you knows about mikado chocolate.
            There is rice in it and it is extruded. So, anyone knows anything of
            extruding amaranthus?

            I very look forward to your answers/hints.

            Best Regards,
            Klemen

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            ---------------------------------

            ¡Sé un mejor ambientalista!
            Encuentra consejos para cuidar el lugar donde vivimos en:
            http://mx.yahoo.com/promos/mejorambientalista.html

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • erez_00
            Hi Klemen, After reading your letter below I took commercial packaged-to-eat Amaranth seeds, sowed them on regular potting soil and watered them every other
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 13, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Klemen,
              After reading your letter below I took commercial packaged-to-eat
              Amaranth seeds, sowed them on regular potting soil and watered them
              every other day. Within less than a week I have very many little
              seedlings. Perhaps there is something wrong with the seeds you bought.

              As for eating them, if you cook them 1 cup seeds in 2.5 cups water
              for 20 minutes on a low fire you get a thick porridge.

              Erez

              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Klemen <dva_wolk@...> wrote:
              > Hi, all!
              I have a few questions about amarnthus.
              I bought seeds of amaranthus plant and (almost) none started for a
              whole week. I have heard that the seeds are tought and it may be half
              of a century to sprout them. They do sprout when they are altered
              (buldozers, etc) so i was thinking would it be a good idea just to
              throw the seeds on the ground and then beat the earth with a showel
              just to wound some seeds?! or is there a better way to do it, such as
              freezing the seeds or something simmilar?

              Since my amaranthus didn't grow much, i collected wild amaranthus
              seeds. But it seems to me that they aren't palatable raw - to tough
              shell. So what is the best way to prepare them? Cooking, baking,
              steaming, can i put them in bread? Grinding? I have heard that maiyas
              used amaranthus - how did they prepare them?

              Anyone knows some good inet resources about amaranthus?
              Anyone heard about "extruding" amaranthus? I hope it is the right
              word - let me explain it. I am sure the majority of you knows about
              mikado chocolate. There is rice in it and it is extruded. So, anyone
              knows anything of extruding amaranthus?
              I very look forward to your answers/hints.
              Best Regards,
              Klemen
            • Rick van Rein
              Hello, ... I know that Quinoa requires removal of the hulls; is that also the case with Amaranthus tricolor? -Rick
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 14, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello,

                > As for eating them, if you cook them 1 cup seeds in 2.5 cups water
                > for 20 minutes on a low fire you get a thick porridge.

                I know that Quinoa requires removal of the hulls; is that also the
                case with Amaranthus tricolor?

                -Rick
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.