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edible plants

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  • josephkuno
    Hi everybody! I want to post questions but I don t know where, so I tried it on this space. Here are my questions: Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 1, 2007
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      Hi everybody!
      I want to post questions but I don't know where, so I tried it on this
      space.
      Here are my questions:
      Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
      cooking?
      Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
      say, during winter?
      Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?

      Thank you very much.
    • Davidoff, Lorraine
      I have had good luck with the PFAF database, I also have Cornucopia II, a great book with lots of information. When trying something new, I look it up, and if
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 5, 2007
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        I have had good luck with the PFAF database, I also have Cornucopia II,
        a great book with lots of information. When trying something new, I
        look it up, and if it says edible, I try a little and see if I have any
        adverse reaction. I eat a wide variety of "wild" or nontraditional
        plants and plant parts along with a "normal" American diet. I will say
        that I had a large fibroid tumor encapsulate an ovarian cyst (all
        removed in January) and the doctors were astonished at how healthy and
        young-looking my organs were, even in the face of organ failure due to
        pressure from the tumor. They didn't need to remove anything other than
        the tumor/cyst. Both doctors, individually, came by after the surgery
        and said that was highly unusual and quizzed me at length about my diet.
        The scar across my stomach was no longer visible in 5 weeks, and the
        doctor was again astonished. I do not use supplements. I initially
        started eating this way due to curiosity, but also because everyone on
        one side of my family died young from cancer, but my great-grandfather
        who lived to 100 even though he also had cancer as a young man... when
        diagnosed, he went into the woods and started eating wild foods... and
        lived 30 years after diagnosis... the cancer faded away. I eat much
        less wild food than my grandfather, but am planting more nontraditional
        things all the time... I am over 50 and need the help :)
        My guess? Our bodies are designed to destroy cancer cells; however
        our diets do not provide sufficient nutrition to run the machine (like
        running a car on 2 cylinders). In part due to junk food, but also due
        to the fact that most of our "improved" varieties are "improved" by
        increasing the sugar and/or starch content... lowering the nutritional
        value of most of our crops.
        As for preserving, I have several books, but have found lots of useful
        information on the Internet for free. Check on amazon.com. Your local
        library will get any book through interlibrary loan for you to check out
        before you purchase it.

        ________________________________

        From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        josephkuno
        Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 11:38 AM
        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [pfaf] edible plants



        Hi everybody!
        I want to post questions but I don't know where, so I tried it on this
        space.
        Here are my questions:
        Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
        cooking?
        Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
        say, during winter?
        Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?

        Thank you very much.






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ariel023
        There are extremly poisonous seeds and leaves, whereas the fruity flesh is OK at a certain stage there are various sites that deal with plants toxicities Ariel
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 5, 2007
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          There are extremly poisonous seeds and leaves, whereas the
          fruity flesh is OK at a certain stage

          there are various sites that deal with plants toxicities
          Ariel
        • Dan Culbertson
          Someone once posted somewhere a web page that described how a man fed his family during the U.S. depression in the 1930s on nothing but grass. Can t find that
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 5, 2007
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            Someone once posted somewhere a web page that described how a man fed his
            family during the U.S. depression in the 1930s on nothing but grass. Can't
            find that reference now but I believe he dried it and ground it up so it
            didn't require chewing (there is silica in grass that wears down teeth very
            quickly). I am pretty sure there isn't anything poisonous in lawn grass.
            How much nutrient (calories and protein) you get is questionable.

            I also saw a survival TV show not long ago. The guy claimed you could stay
            alive eating things like grape leaves raw. Showed him stuffing some in his
            mouth and chewing (and chewing and chewing). I tried some but the ones
            growing all around my house are quite bitter. I'd have to be starving...

            Only common fruit tree I am sure of for green leaves is the avocado - and
            that is just used as a seasoning like bay leaf. Wild strawberry leaves are
            often eaten in spring since they have a lot of vitamin C. But I suspect
            some fruit and nut trees will have leaves that you can eat raw which won't
            actually kill you. But by the time you've eaten a lot of them and decided
            which ones aren't too tough and butter you might wish you were dead. :-)
            Just to be safe I'd avoid members of the cherry family since some species in
            that family have a lot a cyanide in the leaves. Also, the Plants for A
            Future database notes that plums and apples also may have toxic levels of
            hydrogen cyanide in there leaves.

            On the other hand, it seems to at least somewhat common practice in
            primitive societies to dry and powder leaves to add to bread flour and such.
            So maybe powdered leaf gruel would be at least survival food. Members of
            the legume tribe would be really good for this since they have a lot of
            protein. I know pigeon pea and other peas can be used this way. See
            Wikipedia for one list of edible leaves
            (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_plants_with_edible_leaves ) Some of
            the ones listed there, like Cassava, are poisonous unless you cook them very
            well. Others. like wild grape leaves, are probably edible raw but just not
            too tasty that way. Also, if you type in "leaves" as a keyword in the
            Plants for A Future on-line database it brings up 2449 plants which are used
            for their leaves. Ought to be some common trees in that list with leaves
            that are edible raw. Probably easier just typing in the tree species that
            you have growing around and see it they have edible leaves. And finally, if
            you can get the book Cornucopia II: A Source Book of Edible Plants from your
            local library it lists pretty much every edible use anyone has ever had for
            any part of any plant (well, it sometimes seems like that when you are
            looking through it!). But it doesn't ave recipes...

            Dan



            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "josephkuno" <josephkuno@...>
            To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 12:37 PM
            Subject: [pfaf] edible plants


            > Hi everybody!
            > I want to post questions but I don't know where, so I tried it on this
            > space.
            > Here are my questions:
            > Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
            > cooking?
            > Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
            > say, during winter?
            > Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?
            >
            > Thank you very much.
          • Davidoff, Lorraine
            one I like is cottonwood leaves... they are nutritious and the young leaves are tasty enough (I didn t like the first taste, but enjoy them now) raw. They are
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 5, 2007
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              one I like is cottonwood leaves... they are nutritious and the young
              leaves are tasty enough (I didn't like the first taste, but enjoy them
              now) raw. They are supposed to be good in soups/stews. My favorite
              raw are wild violets... the leaves are nutritious and delicious.

              ________________________________

              From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              Dan Culbertson
              Sent: Friday, October 05, 2007 2:13 PM
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] edible plants



              Someone once posted somewhere a web page that described how a man fed
              his
              family during the U.S. depression in the 1930s on nothing but grass.
              Can't
              find that reference now but I believe he dried it and ground it up so it

              didn't require chewing (there is silica in grass that wears down teeth
              very
              quickly). I am pretty sure there isn't anything poisonous in lawn grass.

              How much nutrient (calories and protein) you get is questionable.

              I also saw a survival TV show not long ago. The guy claimed you could
              stay
              alive eating things like grape leaves raw. Showed him stuffing some in
              his
              mouth and chewing (and chewing and chewing). I tried some but the ones
              growing all around my house are quite bitter. I'd have to be starving...

              Only common fruit tree I am sure of for green leaves is the avocado -
              and
              that is just used as a seasoning like bay leaf. Wild strawberry leaves
              are
              often eaten in spring since they have a lot of vitamin C. But I suspect
              some fruit and nut trees will have leaves that you can eat raw which
              won't
              actually kill you. But by the time you've eaten a lot of them and
              decided
              which ones aren't too tough and butter you might wish you were dead. :-)

              Just to be safe I'd avoid members of the cherry family since some
              species in
              that family have a lot a cyanide in the leaves. Also, the Plants for A
              Future database notes that plums and apples also may have toxic levels
              of
              hydrogen cyanide in there leaves.

              On the other hand, it seems to at least somewhat common practice in
              primitive societies to dry and powder leaves to add to bread flour and
              such.
              So maybe powdered leaf gruel would be at least survival food. Members of

              the legume tribe would be really good for this since they have a lot of
              protein. I know pigeon pea and other peas can be used this way. See
              Wikipedia for one list of edible leaves
              (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_plants_with_edible_leaves
              <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_plants_with_edible_leaves> ) Some
              of
              the ones listed there, like Cassava, are poisonous unless you cook them
              very
              well. Others. like wild grape leaves, are probably edible raw but just
              not
              too tasty that way. Also, if you type in "leaves" as a keyword in the
              Plants for A Future on-line database it brings up 2449 plants which are
              used
              for their leaves. Ought to be some common trees in that list with leaves

              that are edible raw. Probably easier just typing in the tree species
              that
              you have growing around and see it they have edible leaves. And finally,
              if
              you can get the book Cornucopia II: A Source Book of Edible Plants from
              your
              local library it lists pretty much every edible use anyone has ever had
              for
              any part of any plant (well, it sometimes seems like that when you are
              looking through it!). But it doesn't ave recipes...

              Dan

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "josephkuno" <josephkuno@... <mailto:josephkuno%40yahoo.com>
              >
              To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com <mailto:pfaf%40yahoogroups.com> >
              Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 12:37 PM
              Subject: [pfaf] edible plants

              > Hi everybody!
              > I want to post questions but I don't know where, so I tried it on this
              > space.
              > Here are my questions:
              > Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
              > cooking?
              > Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
              > say, during winter?
              > Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?
              >
              > Thank you very much.






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Liz Turner
              of the native British trees you can eat lime, beech, hawthorn - when they are young & tender. Liz ... From: josephkuno To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday,
              Message 6 of 12 , Oct 8, 2007
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                of the native British trees you can eat lime, beech, hawthorn - when they are young & tender. Liz
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: josephkuno
                To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 5:37 PM
                Subject: [pfaf] edible plants


                Hi everybody!
                I want to post questions but I don't know where, so I tried it on this
                space.
                Here are my questions:
                Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
                cooking?
                Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
                say, during winter?
                Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?

                Thank you very much.





                __________ NOD32 2574 (20071005) Information __________

                This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
                http://www.eset.com


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Rick van Rein
                Hello Joseph Kuno, ... You should also consider weeds. Some are well-known to taste good, such as dandelion leaves before the flower comes up, stinging nettle
                Message 7 of 12 , Oct 14, 2007
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                  Hello Joseph Kuno,

                  > Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
                  > cooking?

                  You should also consider weeds. Some are well-known to taste good,
                  such as dandelion leaves before the flower comes up, stinging nettle
                  after treatment such as cooking or freezing to remove the sting, and
                  chickweed as a raw salad-substitute. You could also look into
                  non-standard leaves like those of the root crop Scorzonera hispanica.
                  I haven't tried the latter yet, but it is said to taste mild, like
                  plain lettuce. And if you leave the root it grows as a perennial.
                  I also like the leaves of Fagopyrum dibotrys, or perennial buckwheat.

                  > Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
                  > say, during winter?

                  During winter you could use other leaves, such as Campanula spp.
                  This is an article about winter salads:

                  http://pfaf.org/leaflets/winsalad.php

                  > Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?

                  Compare a number of reliable sources; try Richard Maybe's Food for Free,
                  try Plants For A Future and similar books. It's up to you how much
                  printed evidence you need before going for it. I find that PFAF is
                  often quite good: http://www.pfaf.org/


                  Bon apetit :)
                  -Rick
                • Michael Porter
                  I eat Chaya [my variety] and Moringa raw, -and Peach leaves to help with parasites, --Michael Porter Rick van Rein wrote: Hello
                  Message 8 of 12 , Oct 14, 2007
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                    I eat Chaya [my variety] and Moringa raw, -and Peach leaves to help with parasites, --Michael Porter

                    Rick van Rein <rick@...> wrote: Hello Joseph Kuno,

                    > Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
                    > cooking?

                    You should also consider weeds. Some are well-known to taste good,
                    such as dandelion leaves before the flower comes up, stinging nettle
                    after treatment such as cooking or freezing to remove the sting, and
                    chickweed as a raw salad-substitute. You could also look into
                    non-standard leaves like those of the root crop Scorzonera hispanica.
                    I haven't tried the latter yet, but it is said to taste mild, like
                    plain lettuce. And if you leave the root it grows as a perennial.
                    I also like the leaves of Fagopyrum dibotrys, or perennial buckwheat.

                    > Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
                    > say, during winter?

                    During winter you could use other leaves, such as Campanula spp.
                    This is an article about winter salads:

                    http://pfaf.org/leaflets/winsalad.php

                    > Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?

                    Compare a number of reliable sources; try Richard Maybe's Food for Free,
                    try Plants For A Future and similar books. It's up to you how much
                    printed evidence you need before going for it. I find that PFAF is
                    often quite good: http://www.pfaf.org/

                    Bon apetit :)
                    -Rick





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • joseph kuno
                    Thank you very very much for your unformation. Michael Porter wrote: I eat Chaya [my variety] and Moringa raw, -and Peach
                    Message 9 of 12 , Oct 16, 2007
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                      Thank you very very much for your unformation.

                      Michael Porter <michaels4gardens@...> wrote: I eat Chaya [my variety] and Moringa raw, -and Peach leaves to help with parasites, --Michael Porter

                      Rick van Rein <rick@...> wrote: Hello Joseph Kuno,

                      > Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
                      > cooking?

                      You should also consider weeds. Some are well-known to taste good,
                      such as dandelion leaves before the flower comes up, stinging nettle
                      after treatment such as cooking or freezing to remove the sting, and
                      chickweed as a raw salad-substitute. You could also look into
                      non-standard leaves like those of the root crop Scorzonera hispanica.
                      I haven't tried the latter yet, but it is said to taste mild, like
                      plain lettuce. And if you leave the root it grows as a perennial.
                      I also like the leaves of Fagopyrum dibotrys, or perennial buckwheat.

                      > Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
                      > say, during winter?

                      During winter you could use other leaves, such as Campanula spp.
                      This is an article about winter salads:

                      http://pfaf.org/leaflets/winsalad.php

                      > Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?

                      Compare a number of reliable sources; try Richard Maybe's Food for Free,
                      try Plants For A Future and similar books. It's up to you how much
                      printed evidence you need before going for it. I find that PFAF is
                      often quite good: http://www.pfaf.org/

                      Bon apetit :)
                      -Rick

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Rick van Rein
                      Wow! ... Be careful with that. If you digest Chaya, you re supposed to release HCN in your intestines, which is poissonous. The cells of Chaya must be broken
                      Message 10 of 12 , Oct 16, 2007
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                        Wow!

                        > Michael Porter <michaels4gardens@...> wrote:
                        > I eat Chaya [my variety] and Moringa raw [...]

                        Be careful with that. If you digest Chaya, you're supposed to release
                        HCN in your intestines, which is poissonous. The cells of Chaya must be
                        broken before consumption, so the HCN forms and evaporates in the air.

                        One way of breaking the cells is cooking, another way is grinding the
                        leaves and drying them.

                        Source:
                        http://echotech.org/technical/az/aztext/azch2veg.htm#Chay

                        If your variety of Chaya has no such problems, let ECHO know!
                        Does your variety lack the stinging underside?

                        Cheers,

                        Rick van Rein
                      • Mat Coward
                        Hello - can anyone tell me how to tell when the fruits of Chaenomeles japonica are ready for harvest? Thanks, Mat (in Somerset, UK) [Non-text portions of this
                        Message 11 of 12 , Oct 16, 2007
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                          Hello - can anyone tell me how to tell when the fruits of Chaenomeles japonica are ready for harvest?
                          Thanks,
                          Mat (in Somerset, UK)

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Dan Culbertson
                          If you *know* a leaf type is not toxic (check the PFAF database) but it is too tough or bitter to eat raw try this: Collect a bunch of leaves from a bunch of
                          Message 12 of 12 , Oct 16, 2007
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                            If you *know* a leaf type is not toxic (check the PFAF database) but it is
                            too tough or bitter to eat raw try this:
                            Collect a bunch of leaves from a bunch of plants, chop them up a bit, and
                            boil them slowly for about a half hour in a crock pot or rice cooker. If you
                            have any vegetable parings around from making salads (onion skins, celery
                            tops, carrot peels, etc.) add them too. Strain off the boiling water and
                            use it as a soup base. Can be frozen in an ice cube tray for latter use or,
                            possibly, boiled down into a thick base or powder to save for winter (I
                            haven't tried that). If you taste the leaves in the field and they are
                            really bitter you might want to boil them separately and see how they taste
                            boiled before dumping them in the mix. Make sure they are edible first (the
                            PFAF database or any good field guide for edible plants).

                            Yesterday I made a nice soup base out of the following leaves and stems and
                            such: wild Florida Betony leaves, wild celery stems and leaves (going to
                            seed), garden strawberry leaves, wild blackberry leaves, papaya tree leaves,
                            avocado tree leaves, squash vine leaves, bean vine leaves, wild grape vine
                            leaves, canna plant leaves, wild Bidens alba (Spanish Needle) leaves,
                            cockscomb flower (for color), pine needles (green), lemon grass leaves,
                            kaffir lime tree leaves, sweet potato leaves, and a handful of lawn grass
                            (and probably a few more things I can't remember). Only used a little of
                            each one and the overall flavor was generic green and slightly lemony (from
                            the lemon grass and lime leaves). With a bit of vegan "no-beef" base and
                            garlic along with barley and dried veggies added it was a good soup today.
                            Made the dried veggie soup taste much fresher than normal and I suspect it
                            had more vitamins and other good stuff. Hopefully none of those things are
                            going to kill me - but they are listed as "edible" one place or another.

                            Of course that all isn't "without cooking" but some of those things would
                            take a goat's gut to digest raw. Or a shredder/grinder and a compost heap.
                            Might have been able to dry them and powder them and turn them into munchie
                            kibbles - but cooking them is probably much more tasty. Anyhow, I agree
                            with the person who said we don't eat enough leaves. Eat more greens! They
                            won't kill you (usually).

                            Dan

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "josephkuno" <josephkuno@...>
                            To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 12:37 PM
                            Subject: [pfaf] edible plants


                            > Hi everybody!
                            > I want to post questions but I don't know where, so I tried it on this
                            > space.
                            > Here are my questions:
                            > Can humans eat green leaves from fruit trees and even grasses without
                            > cooking?
                            > Can we dry or process these leaves to preserve them for later use,
                            > say, during winter?
                            > Where can we find proff that we can eat leaves from fruit trees?
                            >
                            > Thank you very much.
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