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Companion Planting

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  • greenfingers999
    I am currently putting together a small edible forest garden , consisting initially of apples, pears, plums, and cherries, it will also include understory
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 13, 2007
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      I am currently putting together a small "edible forest garden",
      consisting initially of apples, pears, plums, and cherries, it will
      also include understory species of elaeagnus, juneberry, plus many
      other edibles. If you are doing the same, what problems, if any, have
      you experienced concerning 'companion planting'? Have any of your
      trees/shrubs reacted in any unusual way by beaing planted nearby
      eachother?
    • Griselda Mussett
      Here in Kent UK apples have been grown for hundreds of years - along with Herefordshire, this is the main apple-producing area of the country. Apples are very
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 14, 2007
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        Here in Kent UK apples have been grown for hundreds of years - along
        with Herefordshire, this is the main apple-producing area of the
        country. Apples are very hungry and are grown on the best and most
        fertile soil. In addition, nothing is grown under them. Farmers using
        modern industrial management spray (ugh) to keep the soil bare beneath
        the trees to give the apples exclusive root space. I am told that
        apples have their feeding roots quite near the surface. While I do not
        think you would want to have bare earth under your apples, you might
        plan to put your other crops slightly away from the apples, if you want
        apples to set and grow. I don't think this applies to cherries, pears
        or plums which are grown locally with grass round them.

        In addition, I found that planting berries (blackcurrants,
        strawberries, raspberries, loganberries ) in the partial shade of a
        wonderful old field maple tree had the effect of giving me little or no
        fruit. The fruits needed sunlight to grow, and also to help keep slugs
        away from the strawberries. The slugs and long grass liked the extra
        damp conditions of being in the shade.

        This was not exactly a forest garden but working on a fruit and
        vegetable garden which happened to be partly shaded by trees. I would
        not try to grow fruits etc in shade again! But it may be that under
        smaller fruit trees your shade would be more dappled. The very
        picturesque local tradition is to graze small flocks of sheep and lamb,
        or sometimes have flocks of hens in the orchards - the animals keep the
        grass low, and help fertilise the soil.

        Griselda



        On 13 Sep 2007, at 17:52, greenfingers999 wrote:

        > I am currently putting together a small "edible forest garden",
        > consisting initially of apples, pears, plums, and cherries, it will
        > also include understory species of elaeagnus, juneberry, plus many
        > other edibles. If you are doing the same, what problems, if any, have
        > you experienced concerning 'companion planting'? Have any of your
        > trees/shrubs reacted in any unusual way by beaing planted nearby
        > eachother?
        >
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Traveler in Thyme
        Fruit trees are very shallow rooted, short lived trees (our peaches only live about 15 years before needing replacement). I know apple trees can live forever,
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 14, 2007
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          Fruit trees are very shallow rooted, short lived trees (our peaches only
          live about 15 years before needing replacement). I know apple trees can
          live forever, I've seen trees reputed to have been planted by Johnny
          Appleseed, but they are heavy feeders.

          However, we do grow mints in the shade under our fruit trees --- catnip,
          spearmint, and other low ground cover varieites, which really seems to keep
          away the bugs.

          Trees feed heaviest at the drip line, so planting things right at the edge
          of their shade actually robs them of a lot of their food, unless your soil
          is so deep the trees can get down to nutrients the shrubs can't reach.

          Most fruit trees and berry vines are in the rose family.......and roses love
          companion garlic and onion varieties. We learned about the mints because
          our fields were infested with catnip. Don't plant grapes near roses, they
          give each other fungus. Blackberries, cherries, and peaches are also bad
          companions. But, if you do like we do and just mix everything up so it
          looks like forest instead of orchard, the plants are healthy enough, it's
          just hard to harvest them before the birds and squirrels get everything.

          I thought we had planted enough for everyone, sigh....but every year when
          the peaches are ALMOST ripe, dozens of squirrels move into the neighborhood
          and eat them all green. I hope they get a tummy ache.


          ---Marcia Cash
          Traveler in Thyme
          http://www.travelerinthyme.com




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Gail Lloyd
          There is a good website to tell you some edible plants to grow in shade. It is http://www.pfaf.org/leaflets/ProbPlac.php This site talks about edible berries
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 14, 2007
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            There is a good website to tell you some edible plants to grow in shade. It is http://www.pfaf.org/leaflets/ProbPlac.php This site talks about edible berries to grow in shade and also fuschias, etc. You might also consider mushrooms also if you have lots of shade & moisture.
            Companion planting is important in helping keep insects away, like tansy will keep ants away and marigolds help keep insects away from your veggies, and herbs in general help keep insects away, etc. There is much information on this subject, but one good site is http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html.
            Plants under trees do compete with the trees roots for moisture & nutrients, so it's best to avoid planting anything under fruit trees - just use compost and mulch, and be sure to water your tree around the drip zone and not the trunk (after the first month of watering by the trunk to get the tree established). Water deeply (to 3 feet - test it with a probe) and less often (depending on how dry it is - test your soil & when the probe only goes down 3", it's time to water again). This is true for all trees. For shrubs, water 2 feet, & water again when probe only goes down 2". With flowers, water 1 foot, & water again when probe only goes down 1". A lot of plant problems are caused either by overwatering or underwatering.
            jg


            Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...> wrote:
            Here in Kent UK apples have been grown for hundreds of years - along
            with Herefordshire, this is the main apple-producing area of the
            country. Apples are very hungry and are grown on the best and most
            fertile soil. In addition, nothing is grown under them. Farmers using
            modern industrial management spray (ugh) to keep the soil bare beneath
            the trees to give the apples exclusive root space. I am told that
            apples have their feeding roots quite near the surface. While I do not
            think you would want to have bare earth under your apples, you might
            plan to put your other crops slightly away from the apples, if you want
            apples to set and grow. I don't think this applies to cherries, pears
            or plums which are grown locally with grass round them.

            In addition, I found that planting berries (blackcurrants,
            strawberries, raspberries, loganberries ) in the partial shade of a
            wonderful old field maple tree had the effect of giving me little or no
            fruit. The fruits needed sunlight to grow, and also to help keep slugs
            away from the strawberries. The slugs and long grass liked the extra
            damp conditions of being in the shade.

            This was not exactly a forest garden but working on a fruit and
            vegetable garden which happened to be partly shaded by trees. I would
            not try to grow fruits etc in shade again! But it may be that under
            smaller fruit trees your shade would be more dappled. The very
            picturesque local tradition is to graze small flocks of sheep and lamb,
            or sometimes have flocks of hens in the orchards - the animals keep the
            grass low, and help fertilise the soil.

            Griselda

            On 13 Sep 2007, at 17:52, greenfingers999 wrote:

            > I am currently putting together a small "edible forest garden",
            > consisting initially of apples, pears, plums, and cherries, it will
            > also include understory species of elaeagnus, juneberry, plus many
            > other edibles. If you are doing the same, what problems, if any, have
            > you experienced concerning 'companion planting'? Have any of your
            > trees/shrubs reacted in any unusual way by beaing planted nearby
            > eachother?
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Davidoff, Lorraine
            I have been growing fruits, vegetables, and flowers successfully under pecan, oak, and elm trees for about 20 years. I can grow a wide variety (over 100 types
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 14, 2007
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              I have been growing fruits, vegetables, and flowers successfully under
              pecan, oak, and elm trees for about 20 years. I can grow a wide variety
              (over 100 types of flowering plants) under the trees, even chili peppers
              and tomatoes (lower production but they also flower through the August
              heat when plants in full sun here stop flowering). I think more in
              lumens or foot-candles. If a plant wants full sun or half shade in
              England, I can sometimes grow it in north shade in Texas. If wants full
              sun in Mexico, it wants full sun in Texas as well.
              I also have very deep clay soil, which when kept amended with compost
              is extremely rich and supports closer planting. You didn't say where
              you are creating your food forest, but you can take a clue from any
              reasonably natural forest areas near you. I have many books, but one I
              go back to regularly is a field guide to Eastern North American Forests.
              It lists each major area and the main trees growing there, it lists some
              shrubs as well. I have another field guide to Eastern North American
              herbaceous layer. My area is naturally an Oak-Hickory forest. The
              books list the native trees and shrubs that grow in Oak-Hickory forests,
              and I keep "related" shrubs underneath. If I plant something and it
              looks sickly within a couple weeks, I move it quickly... it's hard to
              know all of the interactions.
              I wish you luck with your food forest, I love mine! I bought 14
              acres (hay field) last year and plan to move within a year. I have
              already started planting pecans, walnuts, oaks, maple, black cherries,
              etc. as my "top" layer. I have apple (they do well under wild black
              cherry), plum (do well under pecan), mulberry (do well under walnut),
              peach, etc. waiting to move to the "farm."
              I'm also writing a book! I didn't coin the term, but I've been food
              foresting for ages.

              ________________________________

              From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              Griselda Mussett
              Sent: Friday, September 14, 2007 3:19 AM
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] Companion Planting



              Here in Kent UK apples have been grown for hundreds of years - along
              with Herefordshire, this is the main apple-producing area of the
              country. Apples are very hungry and are grown on the best and most
              fertile soil. In addition, nothing is grown under them. Farmers using
              modern industrial management spray (ugh) to keep the soil bare beneath
              the trees to give the apples exclusive root space. I am told that
              apples have their feeding roots quite near the surface. While I do not
              think you would want to have bare earth under your apples, you might
              plan to put your other crops slightly away from the apples, if you want
              apples to set and grow. I don't think this applies to cherries, pears
              or plums which are grown locally with grass round them.

              In addition, I found that planting berries (blackcurrants,
              strawberries, raspberries, loganberries ) in the partial shade of a
              wonderful old field maple tree had the effect of giving me little or no
              fruit. The fruits needed sunlight to grow, and also to help keep slugs
              away from the strawberries. The slugs and long grass liked the extra
              damp conditions of being in the shade.

              This was not exactly a forest garden but working on a fruit and
              vegetable garden which happened to be partly shaded by trees. I would
              not try to grow fruits etc in shade again! But it may be that under
              smaller fruit trees your shade would be more dappled. The very
              picturesque local tradition is to graze small flocks of sheep and lamb,
              or sometimes have flocks of hens in the orchards - the animals keep the
              grass low, and help fertilise the soil.

              Griselda

              On 13 Sep 2007, at 17:52, greenfingers999 wrote:

              > I am currently putting together a small "edible forest garden",
              > consisting initially of apples, pears, plums, and cherries, it will
              > also include understory species of elaeagnus, juneberry, plus many
              > other edibles. If you are doing the same, what problems, if any, have
              > you experienced concerning 'companion planting'? Have any of your
              > trees/shrubs reacted in any unusual way by beaing planted nearby
              > eachother?
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Griselda Mussett
              Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I think - or the first time
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 17, 2007
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                Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was
                shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I
                think - or the first time that there were a few dozen on the ground.
                Cars were driving over them so I collected several to see if I can
                start growing some Hickory seedlings. This tree is not native to the
                UK, but is reminiscent of our Sweet Chestnut for size, and Horse
                Chestnut for leaf-shape and the shape of the 'nuts'.
                It's a pleasing coincidence that you mention Hickory this morning, so I
                thought I'd ask for any tips about how to start growing these and any
                other information you can easily send about Hickory trees.
                Griselda


                On 14 Sep 2007, at 15:54, Davidoff, Lorraine wrote:
                > My area is naturally an Oak-Hickory forest. The
                > books list the native trees and shrubs that grow in Oak-Hickory
                > forests,
                > and I keep "related" shrubs underneath. If I plant something and it
                > looks sickly within a couple weeks, I move it quickly... it's hard to
                > know all of the interactions.
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lawrence F. London, Jr.
                ... Hickory is common around here and occasionally you see varieties with large oversize nuts. They self-seed readily where there is good soil. I would gather
                Message 7 of 14 , Sep 17, 2007
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                  Griselda Mussett wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  > Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was
                  > shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I
                  > think - or the first time that there were a few dozen on the ground.
                  > Cars were driving over them so I collected several to see if I can
                  > start growing some Hickory seedlings. This tree is not native to the
                  > UK, but is reminiscent of our Sweet Chestnut for size, and Horse
                  > Chestnut for leaf-shape and the shape of the 'nuts'.
                  > It's a pleasing coincidence that you mention Hickory this morning, so I
                  > thought I'd ask for any tips about how to start growing these and any
                  > other information you can easily send about Hickory trees.
                  > Griselda

                  Hickory is common around here and occasionally you see varieties with large oversize nuts.
                  They self-seed readily where there is good soil. I would gather some good mineral-rich forest dirt plus
                  a goodly quantity of aged organic matter from the ground's surface and plant the nuts you've collected in
                  that, stratified in pots as would be found in Nature.

                  Conkers is a good name for the "wild hickory nuts" (Ewell Gibbons).

                  --
                  Lawrence F. London, Jr.
                  lflj@...
                  Venaura Farm http://venaurafarm.blogspot.com
                  Agriculture, Market Farming & Permaculture
                  http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech
                • Davidoff, Lorraine
                  nice! While your nuts are still moist and viable, pot them up in moist potting soil and put outside. They need a month or so of warmth and a couple months of
                  Message 8 of 14 , Sep 17, 2007
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                    nice! While your nuts are still moist and viable, pot them up in moist
                    potting soil and put outside. They need a month or so of warmth and a
                    couple months of cold stratification. Be sure to put a screen over the
                    top to keep squirrels, etc. from eating them. They get a deep taproot,
                    and do not transplant well unless started in a pot. Make it the deepest
                    pot you can find. In the winter they will get a root, and in the spring
                    they will sprout up and you can plant them out (quickly). Although the
                    books say you have to wait 10 years for a crop, mine seem to start
                    bearing much earlier, although not very many nuts in the beginning, of
                    course. I started about 20 of them last year from my current tree and
                    will plant all of them this fall. I planted 4 last fall. You should be
                    able to plant them any time of year in England; but due to extreme heat
                    in the summer, I plant in the fall.

                    ________________________________

                    From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                    Griselda Mussett
                    Sent: Monday, September 17, 2007 5:27 AM
                    To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [pfaf] Hickory



                    Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was
                    shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I
                    think - or the first time that there were a few dozen on the ground.
                    Cars were driving over them so I collected several to see if I can
                    start growing some Hickory seedlings. This tree is not native to the
                    UK, but is reminiscent of our Sweet Chestnut for size, and Horse
                    Chestnut for leaf-shape and the shape of the 'nuts'.
                    It's a pleasing coincidence that you mention Hickory this morning, so I
                    thought I'd ask for any tips about how to start growing these and any
                    other information you can easily send about Hickory trees.
                    Griselda

                    On 14 Sep 2007, at 15:54, Davidoff, Lorraine wrote:
                    > My area is naturally an Oak-Hickory forest. The
                    > books list the native trees and shrubs that grow in Oak-Hickory
                    > forests,
                    > and I keep "related" shrubs underneath. If I plant something and it
                    > looks sickly within a couple weeks, I move it quickly... it's hard to
                    > know all of the interactions.
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Diane Lee Long
                    If my memory serves me right, it will take about sixteen years to get nuts from that tree. You might be further ahead taking a cutting and put some rooting
                    Message 9 of 14 , Sep 17, 2007
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                      If my memory serves me right, it will take about sixteen years to get nuts from that tree. You might be further ahead taking a cutting and put some rooting hormone on it to try to start it that way.

                      Diane


                      Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...> wrote:
                      Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was
                      shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I
                      think - or the first time that there were a few dozen on the ground.
                      Cars were driving over them so I collected several to see if I can
                      start growing some Hickory seedlings. This tree is not native to the
                      UK, but is reminiscent of our Sweet Chestnut for size, and Horse
                      Chestnut for leaf-shape and the shape of the 'nuts'.
                      It's a pleasing coincidence that you mention Hickory this morning, so I
                      thought I'd ask for any tips about how to start growing these and any
                      other information you can easily send about Hickory trees.
                      Griselda

                      On 14 Sep 2007, at 15:54, Davidoff, Lorraine wrote:
                      > My area is naturally an Oak-Hickory forest. The
                      > books list the native trees and shrubs that grow in Oak-Hickory
                      > forests,
                      > and I keep "related" shrubs underneath. If I plant something and it
                      > looks sickly within a couple weeks, I move it quickly... it's hard to
                      > know all of the interactions.
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                      ---------------------------------
                      Boardwalk for $500? In 2007? Ha!
                      Play Monopoly Here and Now (it's updated for today's economy) at Yahoo! Games.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Davidoff, Lorraine
                      I have read 10 years, 15 years, 20 years. My personal experience has not been that. Many things are put out by industry that are not true, and get repeated
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 19, 2007
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                        I have read 10 years, 15 years, 20 years. My personal experience has
                        not been that. Many things are put out by industry that are not true,
                        and get repeated ad infinitum. I have read "Yes, you can grow that
                        apple tree from seed, but what kind of fruit will you get 15 years from
                        now when it finally bears fruit?" There are people today who think you
                        may not get apples! Trees grown from seed have better root systems and
                        survive drought and other climate stressors better than cuttings. The
                        desirable thing about cuttings is getting a genetically identical
                        tree... and that is the downfall also. It is desirable if not overdone,
                        but one virus or bacteria can wipe out an entire population of identical
                        anything.

                        ________________________________

                        From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                        Diane Lee Long
                        Sent: Monday, September 17, 2007 10:53 PM
                        To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [pfaf] Hickory



                        If my memory serves me right, it will take about sixteen years to get
                        nuts from that tree. You might be further ahead taking a cutting and put
                        some rooting hormone on it to try to start it that way.

                        Diane


                        Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...
                        <mailto:griselda1%40btopenworld.com> > wrote:
                        Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was
                        shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I
                        think - or the first time that there were a few dozen on the ground.
                        Cars were driving over them so I collected several to see if I can
                        start growing some Hickory seedlings. This tree is not native to the
                        UK, but is reminiscent of our Sweet Chestnut for size, and Horse
                        Chestnut for leaf-shape and the shape of the 'nuts'.
                        It's a pleasing coincidence that you mention Hickory this morning, so I
                        thought I'd ask for any tips about how to start growing these and any
                        other information you can easily send about Hickory trees.
                        Griselda

                        On 14 Sep 2007, at 15:54, Davidoff, Lorraine wrote:
                        > My area is naturally an Oak-Hickory forest. The
                        > books list the native trees and shrubs that grow in Oak-Hickory
                        > forests,
                        > and I keep "related" shrubs underneath. If I plant something and it
                        > looks sickly within a couple weeks, I move it quickly... it's hard to
                        > know all of the interactions.
                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        ---------------------------------
                        Boardwalk for $500? In 2007? Ha!
                        Play Monopoly Here and Now (it's updated for today's economy) at Yahoo!
                        Games.

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Infowolf1@aol.com
                        In a message dated 9/19/2007 7:12:35 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, firstwhitelight@yahoo.com writes: If my memory serves me right, it will take about sixteen
                        Message 11 of 14 , Sep 19, 2007
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                          In a message dated 9/19/2007 7:12:35 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                          firstwhitelight@... writes:

                          If my memory serves me right, it will take about sixteen years to get nuts
                          from that tree. You might be further ahead taking a cutting and put some
                          rooting hormone on it to try to start it that way.

                          Diane




                          Or go to a nursery that has baby trees, and get one that's a few
                          years old already.

                          Mary Christine



                          ************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Dee Harris
                          Hickory nuts are all well and good but what I miss and what should be put on the endangered species list is the black walnut tree. I m going to have to go back
                          Message 12 of 14 , Sep 19, 2007
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                            Hickory nuts are all well and good but what I miss and what should be put on the endangered species list is the black walnut tree. I'm going to have to go back to Oklahoma just to find a sapling now.
                            Wolf

                            Diane Lee Long <firstwhitelight@...> wrote:
                            If my memory serves me right, it will take about sixteen years to get nuts from that tree. You might be further ahead taking a cutting and put some rooting hormone on it to try to start it that way.

                            Diane


                            Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...> wrote:
                            Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was
                            shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I
                            think - or the first time that there were a few dozen on the ground.
                            Cars were driving over them so I collected several to see if I can
                            start growing some Hickory seedlings. This tree is not native to the
                            UK, but is reminiscent of our Sweet Chestnut for size, and Horse
                            Chestnut for leaf-shape and the shape of the 'nuts'.
                            It's a pleasing coincidence that you mention Hickory this morning, so I
                            thought I'd ask for any tips about how to start growing these and any
                            other information you can easily send about Hickory trees.
                            Griselda

                            On 14 Sep 2007, at 15:54, Davidoff, Lorraine wrote:
                            > My area is naturally an Oak-Hickory forest. The
                            > books list the native trees and shrubs that grow in Oak-Hickory
                            > forests,
                            > and I keep "related" shrubs underneath. If I plant something and it
                            > looks sickly within a couple weeks, I move it quickly... it's hard to
                            > know all of the interactions.
                            >

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                            ---------------------------------
                            Boardwalk for $500? In 2007? Ha!
                            Play Monopoly Here and Now (it's updated for today's economy) at Yahoo! Games.

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                            test'; ">

                            ---------------------------------
                            Building a website is a piece of cake.
                            Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.

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                          • Diane Lee Long
                            Dear Wolf, I have a few saplings of Black Walnut that need to be moved. I do not have the heart to run them over. Back e-mail me with your address and I will
                            Message 13 of 14 , Sep 19, 2007
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                              Dear Wolf,

                              I have a few saplings of Black Walnut that need to be moved. I do not have the heart to run them over. Back e-mail me with your address and I will send them to you.

                              Diane


                              Dee Harris <corbywolf13@...> wrote:
                              Hickory nuts are all well and good but what I miss and what should be put on the endangered species list is the black walnut tree. I'm going to have to go back to Oklahoma just to find a sapling now.
                              Wolf

                              Diane Lee Long <firstwhitelight@...> wrote:
                              If my memory serves me right, it will take about sixteen years to get nuts from that tree. You might be further ahead taking a cutting and put some rooting hormone on it to try to start it that way.

                              Diane

                              Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...> wrote:
                              Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was
                              shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I
                              think - or the first time that there were a few dozen on the ground.
                              Cars were driving over them so I collected several to see if I can
                              start growing some Hickory seedlings. This tree is not native to the
                              UK, but is reminiscent of our Sweet Chestnut for size, and Horse
                              Chestnut for leaf-shape and the shape of the 'nuts'.
                              It's a pleasing coincidence that you mention Hickory this morning, so I
                              thought I'd ask for any tips about how to start growing these and any
                              other information you can easily send about Hickory trees.
                              Griselda

                              On 14 Sep 2007, at 15:54, Davidoff, Lorraine wrote:
                              > My area is naturally an Oak-Hickory forest. The
                              > books list the native trees and shrubs that grow in Oak-Hickory
                              > forests,
                              > and I keep "related" shrubs underneath. If I plant something and it
                              > looks sickly within a couple weeks, I move it quickly... it's hard to
                              > know all of the interactions.
                              >

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                            • Davidoff, Lorraine
                              go to www.arborday.org, the National Arbor Day Foundation sells them for $7-$10.50 each (they will not put enough chemicals on the trees to ship to Texas). I
                              Message 14 of 14 , Sep 20, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                go to www.arborday.org, the National Arbor Day Foundation sells them for
                                $7-$10.50 each (they will not put enough chemicals on the trees to ship
                                to Texas).
                                I recently got Wild Black Cherry tree seedlings at Shooting Star Nursery
                                online, nice & in pots, but didn't see Black Walnut, they have a lot of
                                nice natives, though.

                                ________________________________

                                From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                                Dee Harris
                                Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2007 6:51 PM
                                To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [pfaf] Hickory



                                Hickory nuts are all well and good but what I miss and what should be
                                put on the endangered species list is the black walnut tree. I'm going
                                to have to go back to Oklahoma just to find a sapling now.
                                Wolf

                                Diane Lee Long <firstwhitelight@...
                                <mailto:firstwhitelight%40yahoo.com> > wrote:
                                If my memory serves me right, it will take about sixteen years to get
                                nuts from that tree. You might be further ahead taking a cutting and put
                                some rooting hormone on it to try to start it that way.

                                Diane

                                Griselda Mussett <griselda1@...
                                <mailto:griselda1%40btopenworld.com> > wrote:
                                Yesterday, in our town centre, a medium-height Hickory tree was
                                shedding its conkers all around - for the first time in its life I
                                think - or the first time that there were a few dozen on the ground.
                                Cars were driving over them so I collected several to see if I can
                                start growing some Hickory seedlings. This tree is not native to the
                                UK, but is reminiscent of our Sweet Chestnut for size, and Horse
                                Chestnut for leaf-shape and the shape of the 'nuts'.
                                It's a pleasing coincidence that you mention Hickory this morning, so I
                                thought I'd ask for any tips about how to start growing these and any
                                other information you can easily send about Hickory trees.
                                Griselda

                                On 14 Sep 2007, at 15:54, Davidoff, Lorraine wrote:
                                > My area is naturally an Oak-Hickory forest. The
                                > books list the native trees and shrubs that grow in Oak-Hickory
                                > forests,
                                > and I keep "related" shrubs underneath. If I plant something and it
                                > looks sickly within a couple weeks, I move it quickly... it's hard to
                                > know all of the interactions.
                                >

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                                ---------------------------------
                                Boardwalk for $500? In 2007? Ha!
                                Play Monopoly Here and Now (it's updated for today's economy) at Yahoo!
                                Games.

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                                test'; ">

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                                Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.

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