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Re: [pfaf] Perennial Kale and Tree Collards

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  • Rick van Rein
    Hello Gemma, ... Two types of perennial kale that are somewhat easier to get by are - Crambe maritima (seeds or plants) - Crambe cordifolia (we found it at a
    Message 1 of 13 , May 22, 2007
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      Hello Gemma,

      > does anyone know where i can get these seeds/plants?

      Two types of perennial kale that are somewhat easier to get by
      are
      - Crambe maritima (seeds or plants)
      - Crambe cordifolia (we found it at a plain gardening plant grower)

      These perennial kale plants are somewhat common as border plants.

      Cheers,
      -Rick
    • Michael Porter
      If you are talking about Walking Collards, Georgia Collards, Southern Collards,[some call this Tree Collards] I grow this and can send you some seed, --Michael
      Message 2 of 13 , May 22, 2007
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        If you are talking about Walking Collards, Georgia Collards, Southern Collards,[some call this Tree Collards] I grow this and can send you some seed, --Michael Porter

        mikeandgem <harrisgemma@...> wrote: hi
        does anyone know where i can get these seeds/plants?
        i'm in London N10 (UK)
        thanks,
        gemma






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      • Geir Flatabø
        Any special ways you use Crambe cordifolia ?? It is growing large here -- time to eat it, any receipts ? Geir Flatabø ... [Non-text portions of this message
        Message 3 of 13 , May 22, 2007
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          Any special ways you use Crambe cordifolia ??

          It is growing large here -- time to eat it,
          any receipts ?

          Geir Flatabø


          2007/5/22, Rick van Rein <rick@...>:
          >
          > Hello Gemma,
          >
          > > does anyone know where i can get these seeds/plants?
          >
          > Two types of perennial kale that are somewhat easier to get by
          > are
          > - Crambe maritima (seeds or plants)
          > - Crambe cordifolia (we found it at a plain gardening plant grower)
          >
          > These perennial kale plants are somewhat common as border plants.
          >
          > Cheers,
          > -Rick
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Rick van Rein
          Hi Geir, ... We just planted it last week... been building up a permaculture as a neighbourhood project in (formerly ugly/useless) government ground:
          Message 4 of 13 , May 22, 2007
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            Hi Geir,

            > Any special ways you use Crambe cordifolia ??
            >
            > It is growing large here -- time to eat it,
            > any receipts ?

            We just planted it last week... been building up a permaculture as a
            neighbourhood project in (formerly ugly/useless) government ground:

            http://robstuinaanleg.nl/haarlephoto/

            Cheers,
            -Rick
          • Pat Meadows
            ... Wow, what a useful-seeming plant. The PFAF database says: ============================= Young leaves have a pleasant cabbage-like flavour, though older
            Message 5 of 13 , May 22, 2007
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              On Tue, 22 May 2007 15:36:38 +0200, you wrote:

              >Any special ways you use Crambe cordifolia ??
              >
              >It is growing large here -- time to eat it,
              >any receipts ?
              >
              >Geir Flatabø
              >
              >

              Wow, what a useful-seeming plant.

              The PFAF database says:

              =============================
              Young leaves have a pleasant cabbage-like flavour, though older leaves are
              rather tough[K]. Root - cooked[2, 145, 177].

              http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Crambe+cordifolia

              ================================

              But it also says 'hardy to Zone 6'. We have Zone 4 cold temperatures where
              I am. The USDA, in a rare playful mood, put us in Zone 5. :) But that's
              not really true. Some years, yes it's true. Other years: definitely Zone
              4.

              Geir, do you know the expected minimum winter temperature in your area?

              I'd love to be able to grow this plant. I wonder if I put it in a
              sheltered area.....

              Pat
              --
              Northern Pennsylvania

              "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism,
              since it is the merger of state and corporate power."
              - Benito Mussolini
            • Geir Flatabø
              At my place - 20 C but it is at least hardy to -25Centigrades... seen it grown on limy unsheltered dry hillside, definitely hardy and easy, sometimes a bit
              Message 6 of 13 , May 23, 2007
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                At my place
                - 20 C
                but it is at least hardy to -25Centigrades...
                seen it grown on limy unsheltered dry hillside,
                definitely hardy and easy,
                sometimes a bit invasive like
                Bunias orientalis..

                Geir Flatabø


                2007/5/22, Pat Meadows <pat@...>:
                >
                > On Tue, 22 May 2007 15:36:38 +0200, you wrote:
                >
                > >Any special ways you use Crambe cordifolia ??
                > >
                > >It is growing large here -- time to eat it,
                > >any receipts ?
                > >
                > >Geir Flatabø
                > >
                > >
                >
                > Wow, what a useful-seeming plant.
                >
                > The PFAF database says:
                >
                > =============================
                > Young leaves have a pleasant cabbage-like flavour, though older leaves are
                > rather tough[K]. Root - cooked[2, 145, 177].
                >
                > http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Crambe+cordifolia
                >
                > ================================
                >
                > But it also says 'hardy to Zone 6'. We have Zone 4 cold temperatures
                > where
                > I am. The USDA, in a rare playful mood, put us in Zone 5. :) But that's
                > not really true. Some years, yes it's true. Other years: definitely
                > Zone
                > 4.
                >
                > Geir, do you know the expected minimum winter temperature in your area?
                >
                > I'd love to be able to grow this plant. I wonder if I put it in a
                > sheltered area.....
                >
                > Pat
                > --
                > Northern Pennsylvania
                >
                > "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism,
                > since it is the merger of state and corporate power."
                > - Benito Mussolini
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Pat Meadows
                ... That s encouraging - those temperatures would probably be OK for my area. Maybe not - we do have colder temperatures than that some winters. It s very
                Message 7 of 13 , May 23, 2007
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                  On Wed, 23 May 2007 17:53:12 +0200, you wrote:

                  >At my place
                  >- 20 C
                  >but it is at least hardy to -25Centigrades...
                  >seen it grown on limy unsheltered dry hillside,
                  >definitely hardy and easy,
                  >sometimes a bit invasive like
                  >Bunias orientalis..
                  >

                  That's encouraging - those temperatures would probably be OK for my area.
                  Maybe not - we do have colder temperatures than that some winters. It's
                  very variable from year to year here.

                  But you know, I can give it a try (if I can find plants or seeds to buy).

                  Thank you, Geir.

                  Pat
                  --
                  Northern Pennsylvania

                  "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism,
                  since it is the merger of state and corporate power."
                  - Benito Mussolini
                • Geir Flatabø
                  If not ask again this autumn there is always lots of seeds. Geir ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 23, 2007
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                    If not
                    ask again this autumn
                    there is always lots of seeds.

                    Geir


                    2007/5/23, Pat Meadows <pat@...>:
                    >
                    > On Wed, 23 May 2007 17:53:12 +0200, you wrote:
                    >
                    > >At my place
                    > >- 20 C
                    > >but it is at least hardy to -25Centigrades...
                    > >seen it grown on limy unsheltered dry hillside,
                    > >definitely hardy and easy,
                    > >sometimes a bit invasive like
                    > >Bunias orientalis..
                    > >
                    >
                    > That's encouraging - those temperatures would probably be OK for my area.
                    > Maybe not - we do have colder temperatures than that some winters. It's
                    > very variable from year to year here.
                    >
                    > But you know, I can give it a try (if I can find plants or seeds to buy).
                    >
                    > Thank you, Geir.
                    >
                    > Pat
                    > --
                    > Northern Pennsylvania
                    >
                    > "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism,
                    > since it is the merger of state and corporate power."
                    > - Benito Mussolini
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Pat Meadows
                    ... OK, thanks again. Pat -- Northern Pennsylvania Fascism should more properly be called corporatism, since it is the merger of state and corporate power. -
                    Message 9 of 13 , May 23, 2007
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                      On Wed, 23 May 2007 21:55:12 +0200, you wrote:

                      >If not
                      >ask again this autumn
                      >there is always lots of seeds.
                      >
                      OK, thanks again.

                      Pat
                      --
                      Northern Pennsylvania

                      "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism,
                      since it is the merger of state and corporate power."
                      - Benito Mussolini
                    • sustain_ability@123mail.org
                      Hello! Anyone using Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.)? From this website - http://www.itnc.org/ - Sea Buckthorn Cultivation Project Ladakh is one of the
                      Message 10 of 13 , Aug 18, 2007
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                        Hello!

                        Anyone using Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.)?
                        From this website - http://www.itnc.org/ -

                        Sea Buckthorn Cultivation Project

                        Ladakh is one of the highest and most remote regions on earth with
                        one of the smallest population densities in India. The people are
                        traditionally farmers in a region that is extremely barren, with
                        extremes of heat and cold coupled with excessive dryness.

                        The Tso Murari Lake, taken from the Tiger Mountain India website.
                        Re-produced by kind permission. In an attempt to transform an area of
                        barren wasteland to prevent erosion and sustain the environment as well
                        as providing economic benefit to local people ITNC financially supported
                        an experimental Sea Buckthorn project.

                        Previous attempts at reforestation have in these areas have focused
                        on fast growing trees such as poplar and willow. Whilst these
                        re-forest large areas there are no economic gains. By contrast Sea
                        Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.), a native of the mountainous
                        areas of Asia that was known to eighth century Tibetan medicine,
                        has several major advantages:
                        Ease of cultivation and toleration of harsh climates.
                        *

                        It roots easily and with its ability to obtain nitrogen from the
                        air it improves the soil.
                        *

                        Its berries are a source of vitamin C, helping to prevent scurvy.
                        *

                        Valuable medicinal oil is obtained from pulp and the seeds.
                        *

                        Its wood can be utilized for fuel, fodder and fencing.

                        George
                        http://transitions.stumbleupon.com

                        --
                        http://www.fastmail.fm - A no graphics, no pop-ups email service
                      • Annina Salo
                        I noticed no-one replied to this one about sea buckthorn. It s widely used in Russia and also in Finland where I m from and grows there both wild on the
                        Message 11 of 13 , Sep 25, 2007
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                          I noticed no-one replied to this one about sea buckthorn. It's widely used in Russia and also in Finland where I'm from and grows there both wild on the coast and cultivated inland. They make juice and jam out of it. It's quite tart so a lot of sugar needs to be added but personally I like the taste a lot. It has something like 4 times as much vitamin C than oranges. Ray Mears wild food programme demonstrated recently how to juice the berries directly from the bush by hand (a prickly job), and then sieve the seeds out of it. According to him, collecting the berries whole is next to impossible but this what my parents do every autumn (unless the birds or juicers get there first)! They freeze the berries and then have them with ice cream in winter...

                          Annina


                          pfaf@yahoogroups.com wrote: Plants For A Future Plants For A Future
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                          1a.
                          Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) Posted by: "sustain_ability@..." sustain_ability@... mogiljan2 Sun Sep 2, 2007 12:35 pm (PST)
                          Hello!

                          Anyone using Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.)?
                          From this website - http://www.itnc.org/ -

                          Sea Buckthorn Cultivation Project

                          Ladakh is one of the highest and most remote regions on earth with
                          one of the smallest population densities in India. The people are
                          traditionally farmers in a region that is extremely barren, with
                          extremes of heat and cold coupled with excessive dryness.

                          The Tso Murari Lake, taken from the Tiger Mountain India website.
                          Re-produced by kind permission. In an attempt to transform an area of
                          barren wasteland to prevent erosion and sustain the environment as well
                          as providing economic benefit to local people ITNC financially supported
                          an experimental Sea Buckthorn project.

                          Previous attempts at reforestation have in these areas have focused
                          on fast growing trees such as poplar and willow. Whilst these
                          re-forest large areas there are no economic gains. By contrast Sea
                          Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.), a native of the mountainous
                          areas of Asia that was known to eighth century Tibetan medicine,
                          has several major advantages:
                          Ease of cultivation and toleration of harsh climates.
                          *

                          It roots easily and with its ability to obtain nitrogen from the
                          air it improves the soil.
                          *

                          Its berries are a source of vitamin C, helping to prevent scurvy.
                          *

                          Valuable medicinal oil is obtained from pulp and the seeds.
                          *

                          Its wood can be utilized for fuel, fodder and fencing.

                          George
                          http://transitions.stumbleupon.com

                          --
                          http://www.fastmail.fm - A no graphics, no pop-ups email service


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                        • Allmende Verden
                          ... Hi Annina, can you describe please how this is done? Thankyou, Klaus
                          Message 12 of 13 , Sep 26, 2007
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                            Zitat von Annina Salo <aimsalo@...>:

                            > I noticed no-one replied to this one about sea buckthorn. It's
                            > widely used in Russia and also in Finland where I'm from and grows
                            > there both wild on the coast and cultivated inland. They make juice
                            > and jam out of it. It's quite tart so a lot of sugar needs to be
                            > added but personally I like the taste a lot. It has something like
                            > 4 times as much vitamin C than oranges. Ray Mears wild food
                            > programme demonstrated recently how to juice the berries directly
                            > from the bush by hand (a prickly job),

                            Hi Annina,
                            can you describe please how this is done?
                            Thankyou,
                            Klaus
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